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2020

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
|
3
Contents
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
About this Annual Report
Brimbank City Council’s 2014–2015 Annual Report
is a thorough overview of Council’s performance
during the last fi nancial year and reports against
the objectives set out in Brimbank’s
Council Plan
2013–2017.
Within this report, we have outlined Council’s
achievements against the objectives in the
Council Plan
.
This report aims to fulfi l Council’s statutory
responsibilities under the
Local Government
Act 1989
and
Information Privacy Act 2000
.
To obtain a copy of this document, please
contact the Council’s Customer Service
Centre on
9249 4000
or view a copy
online at
www.brimbank.vic.gov.au
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
01
Introduction
Introduction
4
Welcome to the Report of Operations 2014–2015
4
Snapshot of Council
5
Snapshot of service delivery in 2014–2015
7
Highlights of the year
10
Challenges and Future Outlook
12
The Year in Review
12
Message from the Administrators
12
Chief Executive Offi cer’s Message
14
Financial summary
15
Description of Operations
17
Signifi cant service achievements
18
Strategies, policies and plans adopted
22
Our Council
23
About the Administrators
23
About the Council
23
02
Our People
Our People
24
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2015
25
Organisation structure at 30 June 2015
26
Workforce profi le
27
Equal Opportunity
29
Other staff matters
29
03
Our Performance
Our Performance
32
Planning and Accountability Framework
33
Council Plan
34
Strategic Objective 1:
Council and the community working together 36
Strategic Objective 2:
Community Wellbeing
39
Strategic Objective 3:
Urban Design and Infrastructure
44
Strategic Objective 4:
Sustainable Environments
48
Strategic Objective 5:
Industry and Economic
Development and Strategic Sites
52
Strategic Objective 6:
Organisational Eff ectiveness
53
04
Governance and Management
and other information
Governance and Management
54
Governance and Management Checklist in Report of Operations
59
Statutory Information
62
2015 Community Satisfaction Survey
68
Advocacy, consultation and community engagement
70
Volunteering in Brimbank
72
05
Sustainability
Sustainability
73
Awards
78
06
Performance Statement
Performance Statement
80
Sustainable Capacity Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2015
81
Service Performance Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2015
82
Financial Performance Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2015
84
Other Information
87
Certifi cation of the Performance Statement
88
Independent Auditor’s Report
90
07
Financial Report
Financial Report
92
A Plain English Guide to the Annual Financial Report
94
Financial statements
96
Certifi cation of the Financial Statements
140
Independent Auditor’s Report
142
Acronyms
144
Index
147
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
|
5
Brimbank City Council was formed
on 15 December 1994, following
the amalgamation of the former
cities of Keilor and Sunshine.
About Brimbank
Brimbank has the third largest population
in metro Melbourne and the second largest
population in the western region.
Brimbank is the interface between the
inner areas and major urban growth areas
of Melbourne’s West – it is the heart of
Australia’s fastest growing region.
Located in the western and north–western
suburbs of Melbourne, Brimbank is between
12 and 23 kilometres West and North West
of the Melbourne CBD. It is bound by Hume City
Council in the north, Maribyrnong and Moonee
Valley City Councils in the east, Hobsons Bay
and Wyndham City Councils in the south and
Melton City Council in the west.
The area was originally occupied by the
Kurung-Jang-Balluk and Marin-Balluk clans
of the native Wurundjeri people. Much of
Brimbank was fi rst settled by Europeans
in the 1830s and 1840s as farming land.
Keilor was established in the late 1840s, whilst
St Albans was established in the late 1880s.
A rapid growth phase took place after the
Second World War, with the development of
many suburbs around the original settlements
of Keilor, Sunshine and St Albans expanding
to house many overseas migrants.
The City encompasses 25 suburbs including
Albion, Cairnlea, Deer Park, Delahey, Hillside,
Keilor, Kings Park, St Albans, Sunshine,
Sydenham and Taylors Lakes.
Brimbank prides itself on its cultural diversity
and is one of Victoria’s most culturally diverse
municipalities, having embraced more than
156 nationalities from around the globe.
Major attractions and facilities include Brimbank
Park, Calder Park Motorsport Complex, Iramoo
Wildfl ower Grassland Reserve, Keilor Public Golf
Course, Organ Pipes National Park, Overnewton
Castle, St Albans and Sunshine town centres,
St Albans and Sunshine leisure centres,
Sunshine Golf Club, Sunshine Hospital, Victoria
University (St Albans and Sunshine campuses)
and Watergardens Town Centre.
Brimbank is home to established organisations
including Aldi, ARC, Australia Post, Boral,
Bunnings, Caterpillar, FedEx, Ferguson Plarre,
Fisher and Paykel, Hunter Leisure, John Deere,
Lombards, Schweppes, Schiavello and Sims Metal.
In more recent times, companies such as Digital
Realty, IBM, Metronode, Preshafruit, Rand Group,
Sleepyhead and Vistaprint have also chosen
to make Brimbank home.
The dynamic centre
of Melbourne’s west
The ongoing revitalisation of open space,
community facilities and town centres coupled
with a richly diverse community has Brimbank on
track to reinforce it as one of the best places to
live, work and recreate in the west of Melbourne.
Over the past few years, Council has focused
strongly on improving the City’s amenity,
liveability, social connectedness and governance.
By investing signifi cantly in accelerating these
outcomes, Council has made signifi cant advances
in planning and delivering community facilities
and public infrastructure, supporting the arts
and establishing all services on the ground.
Council is now consolidating the strong growth
and investment and continuing to strengthen
key stakeholder partnerships.
Located between 12 and 23 kilometres from
Melbourne’s CBD, Brimbank off ers a central
location linking established centres and new
growth areas. It has land for development;
established town centres; easy access to rail,
road, port and aviation infrastructure; and links
to the Princes Freeway, Calder Freeway,
Western Highway and M80 Ring Road, and
the regional centres of Geelong, Ballarat
and Bendigo.
Brimbank has a signifi cant strategic role
to play in the provision of employment
and business development for Victoria.
Council’s business development initiatives
work to promote opportunities, attract
and facilitate new businesses and enable
existing businesses to grow and prosper.
01
Snapshot of Council
Introduction
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
01
Introduction |
Snapshot of Council
Welcome to the
Report of Operations
2014–2015
Council is committed to
transparent reporting
and accountability to
the community and
the Report of Operations
2014–2015 is the
primary means of
advising the Brimbank
community about
Council’s operations
and performance during
the fi nancial year.
Back to contents page

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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7
Snapshot of Council (continued)
Snapshot of service delivery in 2014–2015
01
Introduction |
Snapshot of Council | Snapshot of service delivery in 2014–2015
Reconciliation and
Indigenous information
Brimbank has a rich Indigenous history,
going back to when the Wurundjeri people
fi rst inhabited the region, thriving in the
Maribyrnong Valley.
Council acknowledges the Kulin nation of
people as the traditional owners of the land,
the continuing spiritual connection to the
land and renews its commitment to respect
Indigenous beliefs, values and customs.
About 440 Registered Aboriginal Places
exist in the Brimbank Local Government Area.
The oldest artefacts found in the City are
over 30,000 years old.
On 26 February 2008, Council adopted the
full motion passed by the Federal Government
on 13 February 2008 in saying sorry to the
Stolen Generations on behalf of the Australian
Parliament and people, and extended an apology
to those Stolen Generations on behalf of the
people of Brimbank.
Since July 2011, Council has fl own both the
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander fl ags
alongside the Australian national fl ag every
day outside its Sunshine Municipal Offi ce.
Each year Brimbank City Council hosts a broad
range of activities during Reconciliation and
NAIDOC Week, such as Aboriginal cultural
heritage tours, Sorry Day events, Aboriginal
art exhibitions, library story-telling sessions
and NAIDOC fl ag raisings.
On 17 April 2012, Council endorsed a
Reconciliation Statement of Commitment and
offi cially signed the Statement on 29 May 2012,
committing it to learning from the past and
seeking new ways to build relationships
with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
community, and to developing a Reconciliation
Action Plan. It was committed that the
Reconciliation Action Plan would be developed
in consultation with internal and external
stakeholders including Council staff , Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander residents and local
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander service
providers and community groups.
In May 2013, Council adopted a Reconciliation
Action Plan that demonstrates its commitment
to reconciliation, for all Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people.
Brimbank at a glance
Area
123 square kilometres
Population Count
197,701
(Estimated Resident Population June 2014)
Males
50.0%
Females
50.0%
Residents aged under 18 years 23.2%
Residents aged between
18 and 59 years
60.0%
Residents aged 60 years and over 16.8%
Indigenous population
702
Residents who speak a
non-English language at home 56.2%
Median house price for 2014 $405,000
Data provided by the Australian Bureau of Statistics
2011 Census Data, with the exception of the median
house price for 2014, which was sourced from the
Department of Environment, Land, Water & Planning
using Landata – Land Victoria.
Vision, Mission, Values and
Statement of Strategic Intent
Brimbank’s Council Plan 2013–2017 sets out
Council’s vision, statement of strategic intent,
mission and values as follows:
Vision
Brimbank will be the dynamic centre of
Melbourne’s West. We will be a proud,
diverse and connected community.
Statement of Strategic Intent
Develop Brimbank through enhancing and
celebrating the many diverse identities,
communities and cultures within Brimbank;
creating high quality spaces and places; and
providing learning and employment opportunities.
Mission
Brimbank City Council will strive to achieve
the community’s vision by:
• Meeting the needs of our community and
those of future generations in a collaborative
and fi nancially responsible manner
• Enhancing community wellbeing within
a strong foundation of social justice
• Creating an urban environment that
is safe, attractive, vibrant and liveable
• Demonstrating commitment to
environmental protection, sustainable
development and reducing our
ecological footprint
• Promoting Brimbank as the fi rst choice for
new industry, business and development
• Delivering best practice services that meet
the needs of the diverse and growing
Brimbank community.
Values
For Brimbank City Council employees and
the Council, to be the best at what they do
and achieve the community vision and Council
strategic intent and mission, their actions
and decisions are guided by a set of fi ve
fundamental and unifying values:
we show
RESPECT
we act with
INTEGRITY
we work
TOGETHER
we
COMMUNICATE
openly
we strive for
EXCELLENCE
12km
BALLARAT
GEELONG
BENDIGO
BRIMBANK
MELTON
GROWTH AREA
WYNDHAM
GROWTH AREA
Melbourne Airport
Port of Melbourne
INNER
MELBOURNE
SUNSHINE
Children, youth
and family services
Council provides a range of services
for families and young children
and opportunities for young people
to develop skills and contribute
to community life.
What we delivered
• Coordinated home-based childcare with
213 equivalent full-time childcare places
and 1,265 monitoring visits to 51 active
Family Day Care educators
• Supported provision of childcare
at nine centres
• Maintained 30 preschool premises
• Processed 2,320 four-year-old
preschool applications
• Supported 102 community based
playgroups including 17 facilitated
and 17 supported playgroups
• Provided 24,034 Key Age Stage
consultations through the
Maternal and Child Health service
• Conducted 2,975 Maternal and
Child Health fi rst home visits
• Saw 8,674 children at a Brimbank
Maternal and Child Health clinic
• Provided youth support and counselling
services to 130 young people
• Supported a range of youth programs
attended by 1,219 young people
• Coordinated six youth events attended
by 356 young people.
Waste and recycling
Council has a commitment to
sustainable waste management
and provides a comprehensive
waste service to the community.
What we delivered
• Weekly domestic waste and fortnightly
recycling collection for 67,688 households
and fortnightly green waste collection
for 33,162 households
• Lifted 5,239,650 bins
• Collected 41,904 tonnes of waste
• Recycled 16,086 tonnes of waste
• Collected 9,578 tonnes of green waste
• Collected and recycled 3,330 tonnes of hard
waste, 34 tonnes of steel, 7,439 mattresses
and 2,952 tyres in the annual kerbside hard
waste collection service
• Collected 29,672 kilos of paint, 32,947
litres of motor oil and 850 kilograms of
household batteries
• Accepted 723 kilograms of fl uorescent
tubes, 481 car batteries, 37,475 kilograms
of e-waste and 2,717 gas cylinders at
the permanent Detox Your Home centre
at Stadium Drive, Keilor Park.
Leisure, culture and
community strengthening
Council off ers a range of services to the
community including arts and culture,
sport and recreation, festivals, events,
community centres and leisure centres.
What we delivered
• A range of low cost or free community
strengthening activities at fi ve community
centres/Neighbourhood Houses
• Provided 14,517 program and event
hours through community centres
for 20,042 participants
• Neighbourhood Houses that were
attended by 235,602 people who
dropped-in or participated in a regular
and casual program or class
• Community Leadership Programs
for 37 people
• Governance training for 287 participants
• Held four Brimbank Leadership
Alumni Networking Events
• The Brimbank Leadership Alumni Mentoring
Program for 17 Alumni members
• Held the Brimbank Sustainable Living
Expo attended by more than 1,400 people
• Coordinated the Brimbank Men’s Health
Day and Pop Up Shed events for more than
260 people
• Provided more than 60 grants to
community groups valued at $329,000
• Conducted three Places of Worship tours
visiting nine places of worship that were
attended by 120 people
• Held two Interfaith forums – Faith Acceptance
and Living Together and Caring for The Soul
– for more than 150 attendees within the
Brimbank Maribyrnong Interfaith Network
• Partnered in the delivery of the Fit to Drive
road safety workshops to over 1,000
Brimbank senior secondary school students
• Exhibited work from 30 artists, arts groups
and community groups at the Hunt Club
Community Arts Centre and the Sunshine
Art Spaces Gallery which attracted around
1,000 attendees
• Supported 17 artists or arts organisations by
providing fi ve dedicated art spaces (studios
or shopfronts) for career development
• Launched one public art project and
commenced another major public artwork
• Held four INfuse artists’ network
professional development events,
attended by around 55 artists
• Awarded three Activation Partnership Funds
to artists through the Art Spaces program
• Facilitated fi ve community art participation
projects (two ongoing) involving around
1,200 community members attending
130 workshops, rehearsals and performances
• Supported four community-led arts events,
and a key community festival with 100
community performers and artists and
attended by 15,000 people
• Advised and guided more than 40 groups
and community projects to produce
community events
• A community engagement program of events
that included 22 public performances and
movies in public places engaging more than
50 community performers/groups
• Off ered 162 arts and culture short courses
delivered by 18 artists to 635 participants
• Facilitated 557,930 visits to the leisure
centres (that is three visits per head of
population) and 88 group fi tness classes
each week
• Maintenance of the Keilor Public Golf Course
where 35,004 rounds of golf were played
• Facilitated 185,355 visits to the Keilor
Basketball and Netball Stadium where
4,998 basketball and 914 netball games
were played.
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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9
Snapshot of service delivery in 2014–2015 (continued)
01
Introduction |
Snapshot of service delivery in 2014–2015
Planning and building
Council is responsible for planning
permit approvals, provides building
permit services, and conducts
inspections of building works and
fire safety audits.
What we delivered
• 1,227 planning applications received
• 516 planning related property
information requests
• 289 subdivision applications received
• $365.72 million total value of new building
projects requiring building permits
• 430 investigations resulting from
building related complaints
• 236 report and consent requests
received and processed for buildings
• 49 illegal rooming house inspections
• 267 swimming pool barrier inspections
• 34 after hours emergency call out
inspections (fires, vehicle impact
and dangerous buildings, etc.)
• 104 essential services maintenance
inspections
• 658 mandatory building inspections
• 498 inspections resulting from complaints
relating to planning compliance
• 241 illegal building works identified
• 1,747 building related property information
requests
• 307 requests for copies of plans
• 44 planning infringement notices
• 20 Magistrate Court prosecutions
for both planning compliance and
building infringements
• 284 Building Notices and Orders served.
Library services
Brimbank’s five libraries offer programs
and services for the whole community
and cater for all ages.
Programs include story times and social groups
and services include study facilities, WiFi,
Internet and computer access. Of the 217,000
items available to borrow, 33 per cent are on
loan at any given time. The library’s online
services include e-reference, downloadable
e-books and audio books, access to hundreds
of online magazines, and newspapers in over
60 languages.
What we delivered
• 19,876 new physical items were added
to the collection in English and 15
community languages
• 9,984 electronic resources were
added to the collection
• 1,936,911 total library visits. Of these
visits, 1,098,897 were made to the five
libraries and 838,014 to the online library
• 1,434,977 collection loans. Of these,
1,004,276 physical items were borrowed and
430,701 electronic resources were utilised
• 216,888 catalogue searches completed
• 10,931 new library members registered
bringing the total library membership
to 81,194
• 270,586 Internet bookings made
• 9,191 video game bookings made
• 130,420 reference questions answered
• 3,333 library programs provided
to 66,951 people
• 800 people attended the Brimbank
Writers & Readers Festival
• 1,252 home library service visits made
to deliver books and other resources.
City compliance
Council is responsible for the
management of animal control
in Brimbank.
What we delivered
• 13,368 compliance service enquiries
attended to, comprising 1,977 for parking,
951 local law, 328 litter, 979 abandoned/
derelict vehicles, 2,460 condition of land,
2,152 cat enquiries, 2,541 dog enquiries
and 1,980 other enquiries. Of these,
84 per cent were completed on time
• 974 dogs, 1,789 cats and 94 other
animals picked up by Council officers
• 12,324 dogs and 3,223 cats registered
• Six dog attack prosecutions, 537
infringements issued for animal
related matters
• 14,395 parking infringements and
645 local law infringements issued
• 1,800 vacant properties inspected and
779 fire hazard reduction notices issued.
Of these, 187 land owners were issued
with infringements and 103 properties
had to be cut by Council’s contractor
• 73 event permits issued
• 117 school crossings supervised
every school day.
Environmental health
Council has a responsibility to provide
services and information to the
community in order to protect the
public from disease, provide safety
and ensure wellbeing.
What we delivered
• 2,068 food premise inspections
• 4,516 vaccinations administered to infants
• 11,264 vaccinations administered
to school aged children.
Roads, footpaths, drains
and building maintenance
Council is responsible for managing
the City’s local roads, footpaths
and other assets.
What we delivered
• 1,241 kilometres of underground drain
pipes managed and maintained along
with 60 kilometres of table drains
• 44,736 storm water pits, 423 litter
traps and 38 gross pollutant traps
maintained and cleaned
• 4,924 drain pits inspected and cleaned
• 3,205 litter traps inspected and cleaned
• 950 kilometres of sealed roads inspected
and maintained, including 14 kilometres
of unsealed roads and 1,565 kilometres
of footpaths
• 80,000 street/road signs proactively
inspected and maintained and 5,264
signs physically maintained
• 31,000 (approx.) kilometres of residential
and commercial kerb and channel swept
• 1,683 tonnes collected through street
sweeping program
• 120,328 street litter bins emptied
• 2,028 tonnes of litter collected through
the street litter bin and manual litter
collection service
• 122,428 square metres of local
roads resealed
• 266 buildings maintained on 165 sites
• 208 playgrounds maintained, of which
152 are in open space and 56 in preschools,
child care and community centres.
Ageing and inclusion
Council’s Ageing and Inclusion services
for the community include Home
and Community Care (HACC) and
Community Aged Care Packages (CACP)
and a range of Community Programs
including Community Transport,
HACC Planned Activity Groups (PAG),
volunteers and seniors.
These services support, maintain and enhance
the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of
older people and people with a disability living
in Brimbank.
What we delivered
• 65,741 Meals on Wheels
• 44,431 hours of domestic assistance
• 12,165 hours of personal care
• 4,015 people received a Home
and Community Care service
• 12,907 hours of respite care
• 3,750 hours of property maintenance
• 52,805 hours of planned activity
support services
• 9,090 hours of assessment
and care management
• 33,274 passenger trips on Brimbank’s
community transport buses.
Parks, open spaces and
environment
Council is responsible for maintaining local
parks, creek corridors, sports grounds,
municipal reserves and street trees.
What we delivered
• Upgraded four neighbourhood playgrounds
• Planted 13,900 new trees. This included
planting of 10,000 trees at reserves,
700 trees along arterial roads, approximately
1,700 new street trees, 1,500 trees as part of
park upgrade projects, and 18,161 indigenous
species (trees, shrubs and grasses) planted
within conservation assets
• Completed suburban park upgrade at
Verona Drive, Taylors Lake which was
officially opened on 6 June 2015
• Completed a new on-road cycling route
along Duke Street from Surrey Street to
St Andrews Drive, Sunshine North
• Completed a new 4.8 kilometre off-road
cycling route with lighting and 90,000
plants from Fitzgerald Road, Sunshine
West to Ashleigh Street, Tottenham via
Forest Street and Sunshine Station
• Commenced installation of new wayfinding
signs in Sunshine Activity Centre
• Completed footpath upgrade along Dickson
Street, Sunshine
• Maintained approximately 1,180 hectares
of public open space, streetscapes, grassed
areas and soft landscaped areas
• Inspected and maintained approximately
200,000 trees in parks and streets including
powerline clearing works in line with Council’s
Electric Line Clearance Management Plan
• Carried out emergency tree works and
clean-up following two significant storm
events in July and October 2014 and
March and April 2015
• Maintained 29 sports reserves comprising
63 playing fields
• Maintained 143 irrigation systems including
the installation of a new irrigation system
at Keilor Park fields 3 and 4
• Maintained Keilor Public Golf Course.
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
|
11
Strategic Objective:
Council and the Community
Working Together
Brimbank City Council is committed
to working in close collaboration
with the community, facilitating a
wide cross-section of community
participation, including ‘hard to reach’
groups, through a variety of forums
and partnerships to better engage,
develop, represent, and communicate
with our diverse community.
Brimbank City Council will fulfil its statutory and
legal obligations to the community and manage
the municipality in a financially sustainable
manner to meet the current needs of our
community and those of future generations.
Achievements:
The 2014–2015 Grants program was completed,
resulting in:
• 144 applications received across
five categories
• 60 applications approved for the amount
of $329,374
• Six information sessions held including
two external partnership sessions
• Translation of Brimbank Community Grant
Tip Sheets into 10 different languages
• More than 200 enquiries and 30 meetings
held between community groups and
council officers
• Council undertook a range of improvements
to the website including adding a translation
function and a YouTube link to the front page.
Council also launched Brimbank Buzz, an online
blog to promote Council news and events.
Highlights of the year
Strategic Objective:
Community Wellbeing
Brimbank City Council is committed
to creating an enhanced quality of
healthy and active community life
where our rich cultures are celebrated,
embraced and connected to the
broader community.
Within a strong foundation of social justice,
Council is committed to the provision
of affordable services and community
infrastructure that builds healthy people
and communities through education,
recreation, arts and culture and sport.
Achievements:
• In2Sport Brimbank was very successful,
funding 456 children to join a sports club,
of which 200 had never registered with
a sports club before. Demand once again
exceeded the availability of funding.
This takes the total number of approved
applications to 1,009 since its development
in 2013. External funding towards the
program was provided from Cricket Victoria
and Sports Without Borders
• A Community Soccer Hub was established
at Selwyn Park as a direct outcome of the
Brimbank Cup, which provides newly arrived
and disadvantaged communities with the
opportunity to train twice a week and play
informal games on weekends
• The 2015 Brimbank Cup was successfully
held with seven female and 24 male teams
competing in the event hosted by the
Balmoral Soccer Club
• Council’s Volunteer program continued
to be developed. Volunteering initiatives
included the Home Library Service actively
distributing library material to residents
unable to access the library; Home Visiting
Program linked to the Community Register
where volunteers actively telephone clients
on a regular basis; and the Recycled Book
Program redistribution of library materials
that have been withdrawn from the
St Albans/Sunshine branch libraries.
Strategic Objective:
Urban Design and Infrastructure
Brimbank City Council is committed
to fostering strong pride for residents
and visitors by creating an urban
environment that is attractive, clean
and green and which improves living
and housing, business and recreational
opportunities, demonstrates
environmental leadership and fosters
a sustainable economy.
Achievements:
• Proactively cleaned the activity centres,
including footpaths, using high-pressure
washers as per the approved program
• A number of partnerships with schools were
established with Council signing a Joint User
Agreement for the use of the soccer pitch at
Copperfield College and a Joint User Agreement
for use of the playground at Albanvale
Primary School
• A synthetic cricket wicket was installed
at Glengala Primary School, with Sunshine
Heights Cricket Club benefiting from the
partnership developed with the school
• Both Primary and Secondary schools now
have agreements in place including for use
of Building Education Revolution buildings
and for sports grounds.
Strategic Objective:
Sustainable Environments
Brimbank City Council is committed to
promoting the long-term sustainable
development of the municipality.
Council will do this by facilitating a dynamic
and accessible environment that is supported
by a healthy and informed community that
enjoys rich environmental characteristics
within the municipality. Council is committed
to environmental protection, planning for
sustainable developments, improving the
sustainability of our building stock, and
reducing our ecological footprint.
Achievements:
• Council was named Victorian Sustainable
City of the Year in August 2014 at the
Keep Australia Beautiful Victoria Awards
• On 24 February 2015, Council approved
the preparation of Amendment C163 to
the Brimbank Planning Scheme to introduce
a Neighbourhood Character Overlay over
part of Albion
• The first six months of the 2015
Environmental Event Calendar was delivered
and included a World Environment Day
event — planting at Buckingham Reserve and
National Tree Day event at Sydenham Park
• Ongoing support provided to conservation
volunteers and ‘Friends of’ groups including
attending meetings, planning works, assisting
with applying for grants, promotion of events
and activities.
Strategic Objective:
Industry and Economic
Development and Strategic Sites
Brimbank City Council is committed
to providing local employment and
business development opportunities
whilst also ensuring that such
activities do not have a detrimental
impact on local communities.
The municipality contains a range of strategic
sites (outside of Town Centres or Urban villages)
that, due to their location, size, environment
or current or past use, can greatly assist
Council achieve its economic, social or
environmental objectives.
Achievements:
• Council hosted an Investment Forum in
Sunshine with guest speakers including
Peter Seamer, Chief Executive Officer of
the Melbourne Planning Authority
• At least 461 businesses attended business
development and networking sessions,
including business breakfasts, business
development sessions, group program
and business counselling
• Council conducted a promotional campaign
for Keilor Village through a Discover Your
Own Backyard campaign and Postcards
TV promotion in conjunction with the
Keilor Village Traders
• Positive tourism messages reached over
200,000 people
• In January 2015, Council supported the
St Albans Lunar Festival, which attracted
approximately 70,000 to St Albans, and in
March 2015 Destination Melbourne featured
posts about the Keilor Hotel reaching over
6,000 people
• In March 2015, Council supported Pho
Fever in Sunshine as part of the Melbourne
Food and Wine Festival. Prime time media
coverage including Channel 9’s Today
program and ABC Radio and Melbourne
Food and Wine social media promoted the
event to 1.5 million people across Australia
• Council continues to be a member of the
Western Melbourne Tourism Board.
Strategic Objective:
Organisational Effectiveness
Brimbank City Council is committed to
the ongoing delivery of a broad range
of services that meet the needs and
aspirations of the diverse and growing
Brimbank community.
Guided by the Australian Business Excellence
Framework, the ongoing development of our
staff is a critical element to our continuous
improvement of service delivery. We will
continue to benchmark services to ensure best
practice, lead by example, and implement
best practice services to the community.
Achievements:
• Planning for the Business Transformation
project was completed with implementation to
commence in 2015–2016. The project focuses
on enhancing the customer experience
• Council’s Risk Management Strategy and
Plan continued to be implemented, including
investigating the feasibility of a shared risk
module (strategic, operational, OHS). The first
six months of a risk awareness program was
implemented, and involved the development
of risk culture strategy, risk training for staff
(Managers’ session held in May 2015) and
the start of a comprehensive review of risk
registers, policies and procedures.
01
Introduction |
Highlights of the Year
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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13
As Administrators, we are appointed by Council.
Both Council functions and powers are set out
in the
Local Government Act 1989
. The role of
Council includes:
• Setting the strategic direction for
Council and monitoring and improving
ongoing performance
• Managing Council’s assets
and resources responsibly
• Considering the current and future needs of
the local community when making decisions
• Providing accessible, accountable
and transparent government
• Advocating the needs of the Brimbank
community to promote investment by
other spheres of government and the
private sector
• Promoting civic participation and delivering
programs, which enhance community
health and wellbeing.
Highlights
In 2014–2015 Council delivered a robust
capital works program that included the
commencement of construction on the
Brimbank Community and Civic Centre. This
once-in-a-generation project is a $52 million
investment in the Sunshine Town Centre.
This project will have many benefits including
significantly enhancing the efficiency of Council
operations while also saving the community
money in the long term. This will be achieved
through the consolidation of currently dispersed
offices and creation of a revenue stream from
partner tenants in the new building.
Focusing on infrastructure creation and
renewal, Council also started works on the
$6.5 million Keilor Basketball Netball Stadium
extension and awarded the contract for works
on the $8.9 million Errington Community Centre
redevelopment at St Albans.
Roads renewal remained a key priority with
$16.9 million dedicated to maintaining and
improving our road network. Council welcomed
funding support from the Victorian Government
towards the cost of sealing and improving
Jones and Bunting Roads in the Brooklyn
industrial precinct.
Walking and cycling paths were also a focus with
construction starting on a 3 metre wide, 4.8
kilometre, shared path with lighting between
the Western Ring Road and Tottenham Station.
This path was made possible through funding
from the Regional Rail Authority. It connects
Sunshine to the Melbourne CBD and is a
fantastic initiative boosting the liveability
of the area.
Council continued the implementation of the
Creating Better Parks Policy and Plan
, including
a significant park upgrade at Verona Drive
Reserve in Taylors Lakes. For the financial year,
$1.3 million was allocated to upgrading parks
and playgrounds, bringing the total spend on
park improvements to $20 million since
Creating
Better Parks
was adopted in 2008. Since then,
83 parks have been upgraded across Brimbank.
This Annual Report outlines Brimbank City Council’s performance
in accomplishing the actions outlined in the Brimbank
Council Plan
2013–2017
(Year 2 – updated 2014).
L–R: Jane Nathan Administrator, John Watson Chair of Administrators, John Tanner Administrator.
Message from the Administrators
The Year in Review
Council committed to purchase more than
half of the former Sunvale Primary School in
Sunshine to develop into additional parkland,
and released the Ardeer Green Hub Draft Master
Plan for consultation. The draft Master Plan
includes provision for criterium racing, mountain
bike and BMX facilities. Council maintained its
strong focus on improving the public realm and
providing community infrastructure that can be
enjoyed well into the future.
In our Town Centres, Council started Stage 1
works on the implementation of the Hampshire
Road Master Plan in Sunshine and continued
work towards introducing a Design and
Development overlay in the Keilor Town Centre.
Council also welcomed funding for grade
separations and new rail stations in St Albans
at Furlong and Main Roads, which it has
long advocated.
Council’s commitment to sustainability
was recognised with Brimbank City Council
announced Sustainable City of the Year 2014
at the Keep Australia Beautiful Awards Victoria
awards, which encourage, motivate and
celebrate local sustainability achievements.
This award was a huge acknowledgement not
only for Council but also for all the great work
Brimbank residents doing to make their local
are ‘inclusively’ sustainable.
Council’s focus on a range of community-based
sustainability and conservation initiatives
including waste management, whole-of-water
cycle management, conservation of natural
assets, and energy and greenhouse gas
reduction contributed to this recognition.
During the year Council also endorsed
Low
Carbon West
– a strategy to reduce greenhouse
gas emissions that was developed by the
Western Alliance for Greenhouse Action,
of which Brimbank is a member Council.
Throughout the year Council was involved
in a range of activities to enhance community
health and wellbeing.
Council adopted the
Brimbank Community
Strengthening Policy
aimed at increasing civic
participation and the
Brimbank Community
Grants Policy
(Major Policy) which sets the
parameters for the delivery of Council’s
Community Grants Program. Over $300,000
was provided in community grants over the
financial year.
Other polices and plans introduced during the
year included Council’s
Plan to Prevent Men’s
Violence Against Women, Brimbank Youth
Strategy 2014–2019
and
Brimbank Electronic
Gambling Policy 2015–2019
.
Council’s In2Sport Program approved its
1,000th application supporting young people in
Brimbank to get involved in sport. Council also
delivered the Brimbank Cup in partnership with
Victoria Police and the Balmoral Football Club,
which was supported by Football Federation
Victoria and Melbourne Victory. The fourth
annual award-winning tournament was a
huge success once again with over 32 teams
participating in the event.
Council also provided support to local
organisations to deliver a range of community
festivals and events that enhance and contribute
to community pride. These events included
the hugely popular St Albans Lunar New Year,
Sunshine Pho Fever as part of the Melbourne
International Food and Wine Festivals,
the Sunshine Lantern Festival and ANZAC
Centenary Celebrations in Keilor and Brimbank.
Advocacy and Engagement
Council worked towards its vision of Brimbank
becoming the dynamic centre of the West. In the
Victorian Government’s planning blueprint for
Melbourne, Plan Melbourne, Sunshine was named
as one of nine Metropolitan Activity Centres, and
one of six National Employment Clusters. This
recognition follows significant work undertaken
by Council to promote Sunshine as the heart of
Melbourne’s booming West.
In October, Council facilitated an investment
forum in Sunshine to promote the untapped
potential for investment and development in
the town centre. The forum included a
presentation from the Chief Executive Officer
of the Melbourne Planning Authority Peter
Seamer outlining how Sunshine would thrive
over the next 30 years.
Council is also working in partnership with other
stakeholders to promote the Sunshine Health
and Wellbeing precinct on Furlong Road. State
Government has announced it will construct a
$200 million Women’s and Children’s Hospital
to help meet the increasing demand for services
in the region.
Throughout the year, Council continued its
participation in a number of region wide
programs to advocate for better services,
facilities, infrastructure and sustainability
initiatives in the West.
Council also continued to help facilitate and
participate in the Brimbank Social Justice
Coalition, events to promote White Ribbon Day,
NAIDOC Week, Refugee Week and IDAHO Day.
Good Governance and Transparency
Council has three (3) Local Laws for the City
of Brimbank. Local Law No. 1 and No. 3 are
Governance related, and Local Law No. 2 relates
to the safe and fair use of the municipality by
the community.
Council’s Governance Local Laws set a new
standard in Local Government for promoting
good governance and transparency, going
beyond what is required of Councils through
the
Local Government Act 1989
. Brimbank City
Council’s Local Laws establish an open and
accountable framework for the administration
and governance of the city.
Local Law No. 1 specifically relates to meeting
procedures. Following a review, Local Law No.1
was gazetted in June 2015. Local Law No.1
reflects good governance practice and aims to
enhance Council’s decision making processes.
Local Law No. 2 is Council’s General Local Law
and it outlines Council powers and functions
including how public areas are protected and
used, how the amenity of the city is maintained
and the management of animals .
Local Law No. 3 refers to consultation
requirements for major policy. Council formally
adopted the Local Law No.3 – Governance
(Major Policy Consultation) which promotes
transparency in decision making in June 2014.
The policy prescribes a public consultation
process that must be followed when Council
considers, or wishes to change, a major policy.
Thank you
Overall, Council continued to deliver projects,
initiatives and services that are creating a
better Brimbank. I would like to thank the many
organisations, agencies, community groups
and individuals as well as Council staff that have
contributed towards improving this proud City.
John Watson,
Chair
Jane Nathan,
Administrator
John Tanner,
Administrator
01
Introduction |
Challenges and Future Outlook | The Year in Review
Changes to the sector including
the announcement of rate capping
to come into effect in 2016–2017
Meeting higher community
expectations with diminishing funds
Working with major land owners
and developers to facilitate development
and optimise design outcomes in line
with town centre structure plans
Advocating for public transport
and safety improvements including
grade separations in town centres
Pursuing diminishing government
grants and other sources of funding
for major projects and initiatives
Keeping ahead of rapid
technological change
An ageing workforce
Challenges and
Future Outlook
Challenges
Complete the building of the new
Brimbank Community and Civic Centre,
the Errington Performing Arts community
centre and the Keilor Municipal offices
Plan for the redevelopment, or new build,
of the St Albans Leisure Centre
Continue to green the City and improve
the amenity of the area with better parks,
open spaces, public art and urban design
treatments within a constrained environment
Implement the
Brimbank Disability
Action Plan, Brimbank Community Learning
Strategy 2014–2017, Biodiversity Strategy
2012–2022, Green Wedge Management Plan
and
Sustainable Water Management Strategy
Investigate opportunities for cost
saving and service improvements
through shared procurement
Deliver more services online
to meet community needs
The future
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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15
Organisational Performance
I am very pleased to say that Council met all
of the organisational indicators that were
established as part of the Local Government
Performance Reporting Framework. This
was the first year that Council was required
to report on this particular set of indicators
and they can be viewed in the Performance
Statement. In order to achieve the indicators,
the Council established a robust internal
process that allowed the indicators to be
tracked and reported upon to the Audit
and Risk Management Committee quarterly.
Council implemented a number of initiatives
to drive efficiencies within the organisation.
Major technology projects that started during
the year included planning for a new telephony
system, improving the user experience for
Council’s website and planning for building
a new website. Other initiatives included
preparing to move to a digital first workplace,
investigating online payment opportunities
and integrations to existing systems to better
manage data. All of these projects are focused
on improving the customer experience.
During the year, Council also negotiated
a new Enterprise Bargaining Agreement.
Brimbank continues to be a great place
to work and through the provision of good
working conditions, a safe workplace and
enabling technology we strive to deliver
services that meet our community’s evolving
needs and aspirations.
Thank you
I would like to thank our community, the
Council and all Brimbank City Council staff
for contributing towards Council’s vision and
Council Plan. Together we are making Brimbank
better – better services, better facilities and
better open spaces for everyone to enjoy.
Bill Jaboor,
Chief Executive Officer
Chief Executive Officer’s Message
On behalf of Brimbank City Council
it is a great pleasure to present the
Council’s 2014–2015 Annual Report.
The CEO is the person to which
Council delegates most powers and
has a number of responsibilities
which are set out in Section 94 A
of the
Local Government Act 1989
.
These include:
• Ensuring an appropriate organisational
structure exists for the Council
• Promptly implementing Council decisions
• Overseeing the daily management of council
operations with respect to the Council Plan
• Implementing and embedding a code
of conduct for Council staff
• Providing timely advice to the Council
• Ensuring compliance with relevant
legislation in respect to Council operations.
Highlights
The 2014–2015 year continued Council’s
ongoing commitment to creating a better
Brimbank. Construction started on the
Brimbank Community and Civic Centre, which
is the largest capital project in the Council’s
history. The Community and Civic Centre is a
landmark project that will consolidate Council
offices while also providing a new state of the
art library and community meeting spaces.
The consolidation of offices will create
significant efficiencies in Council operations.
In addition to the relocation there has been
significant progress in 2014–2015 in driving
business improvements.
Following the resignation of the Director
Corporate Services during the year there was
an opportunity to review the organisational
structure. Most of the responsibility of the
Corporate Services Directorate was transferred
to the Governance and Community Relations
Directorate, which was renamed Corporate
and Community Relations. A Chief Financial
Strategist position was also created that
reports in to the Director Corporate and
Community Relations and who oversees
Procurement, Rating and Revenue and
Finance. Asset management, which previously
sat in the Corporate Services Directorate,
was transferred to the Infrastructure and
Environment Directorate.
During the year, an IT Governance Group and
Business Transformation Project Team were
also established to further embed a culture of
improvement in the organisation, focussing on
technology as an enabler. The role of these two
groups is to further enhance the community’s
and other stakeholders’ experiences when
interacting and transacting with Council. This
is a major step in creating a community first
culture, which aims to offer our residents and
customers online access to Council services.
The 2014–2015 financial year
results reflect Council’s ongoing
commitment to financial and
infrastructure sustainability as
outlined in Council’s Long-term
Financial Plan.
Financial Summary
Council’s financial position continues to remain
sound. A summary of our performance is
outlined below. Detailed information relating
to Council’s financial performance is included
within the Financial Statements and Performance
Statement sections of this Report.
Operating Position
Council achieved a surplus of $31.42 million in
2014–2015. This surplus compares favourably
to the prior year’s surplus of $5.37 million. The
adjusted underlying surplus of Council, after
removing non-recurrent capital grants, cash
capital contributions and non-monetary capital
contributions, is a surplus of $13.78 million.
This compares favourably to the expected
target of >0%. Sustaining an adjusted
underlying surplus is a critical financial strategy
that provides capacity to renew the $1.73 billion
of community assets under Council’s control.
Liquidity
Cash has increased by 114 per cent from
the prior year mainly due to the receipt of
Financial Assistance Grants from the Victorian
Government totalling $6.9 million; this relates
to the first and second quarter allocations of
the 2015–2016 year. Furthermore, funds of
$16 million allocated for capital works were
not expended during the 2014–2015 financial
year and were carried forward to be spent in
2015–2016. The working capital ratio, which
assesses Council’s ability to meet current
commitments, is calculated by measuring
Council’s current assets as a percentage of
current liabilities. Council’s result of 200 per
cent is an indicator of satisfactory financial
position and within the expected target
band of 120 per cent to 200 per cent.
01
Introduction |
Chief Executive Officer’s Message | Financial summary
Financial summary
-5,000
5,000 0
10,000
15,000
20,000
-10,000
-15,000
-20,000
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014–15
Adjusted Underlying Surplus / (Defecit)($’000)
Working Capital Ratio (%)
50 0
100 150
200
166.71
117.92
93.66
200.66
250
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014–15
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
|
17
Obligations
Council aims to ensure that it is able to maintain
its infrastructure assets at the expected levels,
while at the same time continuing to deliver the
services needed by the community.
At the end of the 2014–2015 year Council’s debt
ratio, which is measured by comparing interest
bearing loans and borrowings to rate revenue
was 35 per cent, which was within the expected
target band of 20–60 per cent.
Council’s asset renewal ratio, which is measured
by comparing asset renewal expenditure to
depreciation was 53 per cent, which is below
the expected target band of 90–110 per cent.
This is due to asset renewal falling in the
2015 year as capital funding is diverted into
constructing the Brimbank Community and
Civic Centre.
Stability and efficiency
Council raises a wide range of revenues
including rates, user fees, fines, grants and
contributions. Despite this, Council’s rates
concentration which compares rate revenue to
adjusted underlying revenue was 70 per cent
for the 2014–2015 year, which is toward the
top end of the expected target band of 40–80
per cent. Council has focused on broadening its
revenue base and for the 2014–2015 year was
able to keep its rate increase to 6.65 per cent.
This resulted in an average residential rate per
residential assessment of $1,465.55, which
compares favourably to similar councils in the
outer metropolitan area.
Economic factors
Financial Assistance Grants
Prior to the end of the 2014–2015 financial
year, Council received Financial Assistance
Grants from the Victorian Government totalling
$6.7 million relating to the first and second
quarter of the 2015–2016 year. As Council must
recognise these grants as revenue in the period
they are received, this has increased the surplus
of Council for the 2014–2015 year.
Rate Capping
The Victorian Government has committed to
capping the level of Local Government rate
increases to the Consumer Price Index. The
Minister for Local Government has asked the
Essential Services Commission to develop a
Local Government Rate Capping Framework
and provide a final report by October 2015.
The details of the Framework are not available
at this time, but are expected to apply from
2016–2017 year. The impact on Council is
that savings will need to be identified across
its operations to offset the reduced rates
income in the future. Work has commenced
on identifying these savings so Council has a
financially sustainable plan going forward.
Brimbank City Council delivers
more than $100 million in services
and programs. Council’s vision for
Brimbank as the dynamic centre
of Melbourne’s West, with a
community that is proud, diverse
and connected is supported by
this service provision.
The range of programs and services address
needs across the community, from the business
sector, environment, community wellbeing,
roads and infrastructure to animal management.
Community take-up of the services and programs
show the importance of these Council functions.
The Council Plan 2013–2017
outlines Council’s
Strategic Directions, which are supported by
a number of other Council strategies, plans
and policies. This includes the Annual Budget
2014–2015, which highlights project priorities
and spending.
Council’s Strategic Objectives are monitored
by a set of service performance indicators and
measures. They offer a corporate framework for
the delivery of services, facilities, support and
advocacy and achieving the vision and objectives
outlined in the Brimbank Community Plan. The
Council Plan sets out Council’s key strategic
directions and actions for a four year period.
Council’s actions are guided by Victorian and
Australian legislation which supports good
governance and enables Council to responsibly
deliver a community first approach.
Major capital works
During 2014–2015 the major capital works
included the following:
Brimbank Community and Civic Centre
The Brimbank Community and Civic Centre is a
once-in-a-generation project being constructed
on Hampshire Road in the Sunshine Town Centre.
The purpose-built building will include:
• A new Sunshine Library over two levels
• A new Sunshine Customer Service Centre
• A range of community meeting spaces
• Council Chambers
• Exhibition spaces, and
• A local history interpretive centre.
The Brimbank Community and Civic Centre will
also provide new offices for Council staff that are
currently located in a number of offices around
Sunshine and in Keilor, as well as tenant spaces
for other businesses.
Contractors commenced demolition works on
the former Sunshine Library and Customer
Se
rvice Centre building on Hampshire Road
in October 2014. Construction commenced
in November 2014.
Th
e new centre is on track to be completed
mid-2016 at a total cost of $52 million.
Errington Community Centre redevelopment
The Errington Community Centre and Performing
Arts Facility in Princess Street, St Albans,
is being redeveloped to provide accessible,
flexible community spaces and places for
all life stages for residents today and for
ge
nerations to come.
The project will include the construction of a
second storey above the existing single storey
building, in addition to the reconfiguration and
improvement of existing facilities including halls,
meeting and activity spaces, as well as support
amenities such as kitchens and toilets.
New facilities will include a 200-seat flexible
performing arts space with associated support
spaces, additional meeting rooms, rehearsal
room, a dance space, art and craft studio, a
consultation room, office support space and
education/training spaces.
The project also includes a civic entry plaza,
landscaping and site improvements to integrate
the newly refurbished and expanded facility
within the wider, cohesive, Errington Precinct.
The total cost of the project is $8.96 million
and includes $2.5 million from the St Albans
Community Centre Co-Operative Ltd and a
$500,000 Community Support Fund grant
from the Victorian Government.
In A
pril 2015, Council awarded the contract
and the official contract between parties
wa
s signed mid-June for construction of the
redevelopment to Devco Project & Construction
Management Pty Ltd.
The project is expected to be completed
in late 2016.
Extension of the Keilor Basketball
Netball Stadium
Construction of the extension of the Keilor
Basketball Netball Stadium commenced
in September 2014 and is anticipated to open
later in 2015.
Th
e $6.5 million extension includes three new
basketball and netball courts. These courts are
expected to host high level games and attract
up to elite level training and competitions to
Brimbank. The extension also includes a 200
seat grandstand, change rooms and toilets,
a courtyard, and storage shed. The project
included construction of the car park in front
of the stadium.
C
o
urts will also be line-marked for other
uses including badminton and volleyball
to ensure they meet Brimbank’s growing
sp
o
rting demands.
The project is supported by investments by
the Keilor Basketball Association ($1.2 million)
and
Victorian Government ($650,000).
Upgrade of Hampshire Road
(Dickson Street to Devonshire Road)
In October 2014, Council adopted the
Hampshire
Road Master Plan 2014
, which outlines a vision
for the evolution of Sunshine’s premier ‘main
street’ in four stages.
In April 2015, the contract was awarded for
the construction of stage one of the Hampshire
Ro
ad upgrade and construction commenced
in May 2015.
St
age one works included footpath and street
lighting upgrades, a raised pedestrian crossing
and construction of a sculptural seating wall.
Works will be constructed at a cost of $1,180,000
including a $200,000 grant from the Victorian
Government’s Community Infrastructure Fund
and are expected to be completed later in 2015.
Continuation of parks
and playground upgrades
In continuing the implementation of Brimbank’s
Creating Better Parks – Open Space and
Playground Policy and Plan Council
completed
five playground upgrades during 2014–2015.
Upgrades included Verona Drive Reserve
Suburban Park in Taylors Lakes at a cost
of $440,000, and a total of $400,000 in
neighbourhood park upgrades at:
• Cromwell Reserve, Kings Park
• Bonfield Reserve, Keilor
• Proctor Crescent Reserve, Keilor Downs
• Empress Court Reserve, Sunshine.
Roads, footpaths and pedestrian facilities
Council continued to implement the Road Asset
Management Plan through the delivery of a $16.9
million road rehabilitation and upgrade program.
Some of the projects completed as part of this
program include road pavement rehabilitation
works to Industrial Drive, Tullamarine ($813k),
Cox Street, St Albans ($778k) and Conrad Street,
St Albans ($555k). Local Area Traffic Management
works were also completed in Albanvale at a cost
of about $450,000.
Council also commenced the construction of
Jones and Bunting roads in Brooklyn, with a total
project value of $2.6 million.
Sports facilities
Council continued to invest in upgrades at
sporting facilities across the municipality.
Council commenced an upgrade of the male and
female change rooms at St Albans Leisure Centre
in January 2015. Works were completed in May
2015 at a cost of $265,000.
Council successfully completed its $200,000
2014–2015 sports reserve lighting renewal
program for the year.
The sports ground irrigation was upgraded
at Keilor Park Oval 2.
In M
arch 2015, the Keilor Park soccer pitch 3 flood
light installation project and Arthur Beachley
Reserve flood light installation project were
completed. The projects cost approximately
$363,000 and were funded by Council, including
a contribution of $10,000 from Keilor Park Soccer
Club for the Keilor soccer pitch 3.
In May 2015, Council completed the
redevelopment of Dempster Park change
rooms. The project was funded by Council
at a cost of approximately $1.3 million.
Co
uncil commenced installation of new sports
reserve lighting at Selwyn Park Reserve as part
of Council’s sports ground lighting upgrade
program. Work commenced in June 2015
and is due for completion in 2015–2016.
The project will cost $200,000.
Co
uncil also tendered for the refurbishment of
the Larissa Reserve pavilion in North Sunshine.
Works are scheduled to commence in 2015–2016.
Financial summary (continued)
Description of Operations
01
Introduction |
Financial summary | Description of Operations
50
10 15
20
18
25
42
35
25 30
35 40
45
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014–15
100
20 30
40
76
64
61
53
50 60
70 80
90
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014–15
Loan Borrowings (%)
Asset Renewal (%)
Rate Concentration (%)
66 64
68 70
72
69
72
76
70
74 76
78
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014–15
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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19
July 2014
August 2014
September 2014
October 2014
November 2014
December 2014
Significant service achievements 2014
• Council finalised arrangements with
the Department of Education and Early
Childhood Development, to begin clearing
and improvement works to the section of
the former Sunvale site purchased to create
a community park, ahead of Council taking
ownership of the site in early 2016
• Council endorsed Planning Scheme
Amendment C105, which has the potential
to unlock the Sunshine Town Centre and
generate over $1 billion in investment
and referred it to the Minister for Planning
for approval
• Council opened a $430,000 suburban
park upgrade of Dalton Drive Reserve
in Sunshine West
• Council introduced heritage overlay
Amendment C171 – Heritage Gaps Stage 2
to the Brimbank Planning Scheme, to apply
heritage controls to two properties at
11 King Edward Avenue, Albion and
17–27 Maxweld Street, Ardeer
• Council adopted its 2014–2015 Annual
Budget, demonstrating a commitment to
enhancing Brimbank’s social and physical
infrastructure through a capital works
program of $65.7 million, while having a plan
in place to maintain stability of the City’s
finances and ensure rates are predictable
going forward.
• Council took further steps to protect local
buildings and sites of heritage significance,
through an amendment to the Brimbank
Planning Scheme (Amendment C167 –
Heritage Gaps Report and Heritage Policy
Review). The amendment responded to
recommendations in the Heritage Gaps
Report 2014, which had assessed additional
sites of potential heritage significance and
anomalies within the Brimbank Heritage
Study of 2007
• Council received a commitment of $1.2
million funding over five years from the Keilor
Basketball Association (KBA) towards the
Keilor Basketball and Netball Stadium (KBNS)
redevelopment to fund a third new court to
be built as part of the stadium expansion
• The Sunshine Library and Sunshine Customer
Service Centre moved temporarily from
Hampshire Road to new locations in the
nearby Sunshine Municipal office precinct, to
make way for construction of the $52 million
Brimbank Community and Civic Centre
• On Friday 1 August Brimbank City Council
was announced Sustainable City of the
Year at the Keep Australia Beautiful
Awards Victoria awards which encourage,
motivate and celebrate local sustainability
achievements. Brimbank took out the
honours for the Community Action and
Leadership Award for the Brimbank Gems
Program and Resource Recovery and Waste
Management Award for the Sustainable
Living Expo.
• Winners of the Brimbank Writers Awards,
part of the 2014 Brimbank Writers and
Readers Festival, were announced following
320 entries across seven categories
• Council won the Stormwater Victoria Award
for Research and Innovation for its system
to manage the ongoing maintenance of its
Stormwater pipe assets
• Council called for tenders for the
$8.9 million redevelopment of Errington
Community Centre
• Council successfully prosecuted the owner of
an unregistered dog involved in an attack at a
sporting venue in June, with the owner being
fined and placed on a good behaviour bond
• Council won two Parks and Leisure Australia
awards gaining national recognition.
The Brimbank Cup won the Inclusive and
Connected Communities Award at the 2014
Parks and Leisure Australia National Awards,
while the online sports facility allocation
system won the Use of Technology Award
• Council launched a new Learning Hub — a
new online portal on the Brimbank Libraries’
upgraded website, to enhance learning
opportunities for the community
• Council supported the Sunshine Lantern
Festival, a free community event, organised
by the Sunshine Business Association
in Hampshire Road, Sunshine, which
included entertainment and a spectacular
fireworks display.
• Nominations opened for the Brimbank
Australia Day Awards, which recognises
community achievement by individuals or
groups who make a significant contribution,
or provide outstanding service, to the
Brimbank community
• Council commenced the Light Up Sunshine
program to improve vibrancy of the
town centre, attract visitors and address
perceptions around community safety.
It included a range of events from January
to March, including movies in the park,
live music as well as lighting upgrades
• Council endorsed the St Albans Leisure
Centre Feasibility Study, which positioned
Council to advocate for future external
funding opportunities
• Council held an investment forum in Sunshine
to showcase Sunshine’s development
potential, including its central location
to the West and proximity to the CBD
• Council adopted the
Hampshire Road Master
Plan
, cementing a vision for the evolution
of Sunshine’s premier main street
• Council adopted the Keilor Office Building
Future Use Project Progress Report, which
listed potential future uses for Brimbank City
Council’s Keilor Office Building developed
through community consultations
• Council awarded a contract for construction
of the new $52 million Brimbank Community
and Civic Centre
• Council held the Kids Day Out in Brimbank,
featuring musicians, storytelling, workshops,
sporting activities and more, at the Errington
Community Centre, St Albans
• Brimbank Youth Services’ B-Creative Urban
Aerosol Art Program was recognised as a
finalist in the 2014 READYS (Recognising
Excellence Awards for Delivery of Youth
Services) in the Local Government Category.
• Council endorsed Low Carbon West —
a strategy to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions, developed by the Western
Alliance for Greenhouse Action (WAGA),
a representative of western region
local councils
• Brimbank’s New Residential Zones came into
effect following the Minister for Planning’s
approval of Amendment C158. The zones
are applied in accordance with the Brimbank
Housing Strategy ‘Home and Housed’ to
provide for the Neighbourhood Residential
Zone (low change), General Residential Zone
(medium change) and the Residential Growth
Zone (high change) across the municipality
• Council launched public artwork, Reflexio
Qualis, at the bus interchange in Sunshine,
on the corner of Hampshire Road and
Dickson Street
• Council was awarded the National Award for
Resource Recovery and Waste Management,
after it represented Victoria at the National
Keep Australia Beautiful — Sustainable Cities
awards, held in Adelaide.
• The Greening the West initiative, which
aims to improve health through increased
urban greening in Melbourne’s western
metropolitan area, was recognised at the
Victorian Health Promotion Foundation
Awards. Council was a member of the
steering committee that developed the
Greening the West strategy
• Council approved Brimbank Planning
Scheme Amendment C166 – New
Residential Zones Stage 2, which was
then submitted for review by the State
Government’s Residential Zones Standing
Advisory Committee
• Council completed a new North Sunshine
Industrial Estate stormwater detention
tank, as part of its ongoing commitment
to essential services and infrastructure
in the area
• Council adopted a
Community Facilities and
Reserves Allocation Policy
, providing a strong
and robust process that will ensure available
facilities and reserves are allocated in a fair
and transparent manner, with maximum
benefit to the community
• Council opened a new $100,000 playground
at Cromwell Reserve in Kings Park
• Council launched a mosaic mural celebrating
community partnerships and local history
in the Deer Park Arcade, Ballarat Road
• For the second year running, Council
presented Carols at the Castle at
Overnewton Castle, with proceeds
from the sale of the tickets going to
the Brimbank Community Fund.
01
Introduction |
Significant service achievements 2014
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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21
Significant service achievements 2015
• The 2015 Brimbank Australia Day Award
winners were announced at a special
ceremony attended by award winners
and nominees, their families and friends.
The winners were: Citizen of the Year,
Kim Thien Truong; Young Citizen of the
Year, Maima Massaquoi; Environmental
Achievement Award, Friends of Iramoo;
Cultural Achievement Award, Loketi Niua
Latu; Educator of the Year, Yvonne Reilly;
Lifetime Achievement Award, Allan ‘Titch’
Williams; Essential Services Excellence,
SES Brimbank Unit
• The City of Brimbank hosted one of the
largest citizenship ceremonies in Victoria,
with 180 conferees receiving Australian
Citizenship on Australia Day, 26 January.
• The 2015 Brimbank Sustainable Living
Expo, featuring Gardening Australia’s Costa
Georgiadis and showcasing sustainability
in the West, was held at St Albans’ Westvale
Community Centre
• Council welcomed an additional $950,000
in State Government funding to seal
and improve Jones and Bunting roads
in Brooklyn’s Industrial Precinct
• More than 32 teams competed in the fourth
annual award-winning Brimbank Cup
tournament, which was delivered by
Council in partnership with Victoria Police
and Balmoral Football Club and supported
by the Football Federation Victoria and
Melbourne Victory
• Brimbank Libraries launched a new Mobile
Print service allowing library customers
to print documents from any mobile device.
• Council’s In2Sport Program approved
its 1000th application supporting young
people in Brimbank to get involved in sport.
Applicants are eligible for up to $200
financial assistance to contribute to club
fees, for Brimbank children whose family
holds either a Health Care Card or Pension
Concession Card
• Sunshine Pho Fever was held across
three nights in March, as part of the 2015
Melbourne Food and Wine Festival. Hosted
by the Sunshine Business Association for the
third year and supported by Council, the 2015
event celebrated 40 years of Vietnamese
settlement in Australia and Sunshine with
the ultimate Vietnamese progressive dinner.
• Brimbank Libraries extended opening
hours in response to customer feedback
and a review of library processes
• Council adopted the
Brimbank Youth
Strategy 2015–2019
to address the needs
of young people aged 12 to 25 years old
that live, work, study or socialise in Brimbank
• Council awarded a contract for the highly
anticipated redevelopment of Errington
Community Centre in Princess Street, St Albans
• Council took another step towards
introducing a Design and Development
Overlay in Keilor Village to help maintain
the village character of the Keilor Town
Centre. Council requested the Minister
for Planning to appoint a panel to review
an unresolved submission objecting to
the proposed Brimbank Planning Scheme
Amendment C162 – Keilor Village Design
and Development Overlay
• Council completed a background report on
the Sunshine National Employment Cluster
that was provided to the Metropolitan
Planning Authority (MPA), to help inform
its preparation of the Sunshine National
Employment Cluster Framework Plan
• The great work of local sporting clubs was
acknowledged at the annual 2015 Brimbank
Sports Awards; clubs and individual club
members were awarded in six categories
• Council completed stage two of a program
to replace 11,500 streetlights, part of a larger
program, to save more than $500,000 in
electricity and maintenance bills each year.
• Construction began on the first stage of
the $1.8 million Hampshire Road Master
Plan implementation, concentrating on the
area between Devonshire Road and Dickson
Street, Sunshine. The first of four stages,
stage one works include footpaths and
street lighting upgrades, a raised pedestrian
crossing and a sculptural seating wall
• Community consultation began on the
proposed Ardeer Green Activity Hub,
which could include criterium racing,
and mountain bike and BMX facilities
with significant tree planting and remnant
grassland rehabilitation
• Work commenced on a $2.6 million project to
seal Bunting and Jones roads to reduce dust
and address air quality concerns associated
with the Brooklyn Industrial Precinct
• Council made a submission to the Royal
Commission into Family Violence outlining
Council’s recently adopted
Plan to Prevent
Men’s Violence Against Women – Towards
Gender Equity
.
• Council adopted its 2015–2016 Annual
Budget, to help Council deliver services
and works that reflect community needs
and expectations while also keeping rates
as low as practicable
• Council adopted the
Council Plan 2013–2017
(Year 3 – Updated 2015) and the
Strategic
Resource Plan
, following public consultation
• Council adopted the
Brimbank Children’s
Plan 2015–2019
, to guide the development
and coordination of education, care, health
services, infrastructure and activities for
children up to 12 years and their families
• Community satisfaction with Brimbank
City Council’s performance continued to be
generally stable, according to the results
of the 2015 Local Government Community
Satisfaction Survey coordinated by the
Department of Environment, Land, Water
and Planning (DELWP)
• The inaugural Brimbank Community Fund
grants were awarded, with four recipients
receiving grants totalling $15,000. The
Brimbank Community Fund is a charitable
fund account of the Lord Mayor’s Charitable
Foundation that provides a permanent and
growing source of much-needed investment
for the Brimbank community
• Council supported a proposed planning
scheme amendment (C181) to facilitate the
removal of the dangerous Furlong Road level
crossing, after it was funded and fast tracked
to be delivered with the Main Road, St Albans
Level Crossing project works starting in 2015
• Council successfully prosecuted a property
owner and builder for carrying out building
work without a building permit, in
contravention of the
Building Act 1993
• Council successfully prosecuted an individual
who had dumped a truckload of household
waste in Sun Crescent, Sunshine.
01
Introduction |
Significant service achievements 2015
January 2015
February 2015
March 2015
April 2015
May 2015
June 2015
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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23
Local Law No. 3, 2014 – Governance
(Major Policy Consultation) (July 2014)
This law is designed to promote transparency
of decision-making. It enables Council to
determine whether a policy is, or is not, a ‘major
policy’ and prescribes a public consultation
process to be followed when the Council
proposes to make, amend, modify or revoke
a ‘major policy’.
Sports Facility Hire, Licenses
and Leases Agreement Policy
(July 2014)
Council’s Sports Facilities Agreement provides
guidance for the ongoing allocation of 46
sporting pavilions, 94 playing fields, and 40
courts to community sports clubs. The policy
was updated to provide Council with a basis
to enter into new formal agreements with all
sports clubs for the future.
Brimbank Place Naming Policy
(August 2014)
The purpose of the policy is to provide guidance
for the naming of geographic places, features,
localities and roads in the City of Brimbank.
The policy places an emphasis on preserving
the City’s identity and heritage, recognising its
rich cultural and ethnic diversity, and ensuring
naming decisions are made in the best interests
of the whole community.
Revised Protected Disclosures Policy
and Procedure (August 2014)
Key changes to Brimbank Council’s revised
Protected Disclosures Policy
and procedures
mainly relate to clarification around disclosures
being made confidentially (in the policy),
consistent terminology, and updated links,
contact details and penalty units information.
Revised Asset Management Policy
2014 (September 2014)
The policy serves to outline a strategic
framework for the management of
infrastructure assets to deliver Council’s Vision.
Council’s previous
Asset Management Policy
was adopted in 2011. The revised policy aims
to present its objectives in a more succinct and
easier to interpret way.
Brimbank Community Grants Policy
2014 – Major Policy (October 2014)
This Major Policy guides the delivery of the
Brimbank City Council Community Grants
Program, which provides one-off financial
assistance to not-for-profit organisations that
deliver services or undertake activities that
benefit the Brimbank community.
Brimbank Community Strengthening
Policy (October 2014)
This policy provides the context for Council’s
actions and commitment to building stronger,
more resilient communities. It identifies key
information that will guide Council’s support
for Brimbank’s individuals and community
groups to increase civic participation, and
ensure robust, accessible and democratic
local organisations.
Hampshire Road Master Plan
(October 2014)
The
Hampshire Road Master Plan
has been
created to guide the development of Sunshine’s
premier ‘main street’ as it evolves to meet the
needs of a changing and growing population.
The Master Plan guides the redevelopment of
the precinct as a unique, vibrant, legible, safe
and comfortable place for pedestrians, cyclists
and public transport users.
Sunshine Town Centre Pedestrian
Way Finding Signage Strategy
(October 2014)
This strategy has been developed to improve
the legibility, accessibility, connectivity and
identity of the Sunshine Town Centre, by
defining a distinct and clearly delineated
network of pedestrian connections across
public and private spaces.
Privacy and Health Records Policy
Review 2014 (November 2014)
The policy governs how Council works within
the legislative framework to comply with the
Information Privacy Principles (IPPs). It provides
information to the community about how their
private information will be used and protected
by Council. The
Privacy and Health Records
Policy
was revised and updated following
changes to Victorian privacy legislation.
Integrated Asset Management
Strategy 2014–2024
(December 2014)
The strategy has been revised in line with the
strategic directions set out in the
Council Plan
2013–2017
. The strategy outlines long-term
actions and objectives for the management of
infrastructure assets, to deliver Council’s vision.
Community Facilities and Reserves
Allocation Policy Major Policy
(December 2014)
This policy provides the direction for the
allocation of available community facilities and
reserves within Brimbank to ensure their fair
and equitable distribution to sports clubs and
community groups within Brimbank, and ensure
the optimal use of community facilities to meet
community needs.
Council adopted the following strategies, policies and plans in 2014–2015.
The
Local Government
(Brimbank Council) Act
2009
to dismiss elected
Councillors was passed by
the Victorian Parliament
on 12 November 2009.
About the Administrators
Administrators act as the Council,
and have no additional power
outside the formal decision-making
process as outlined in the
Local
Government Act 1989
.
Administrators have no special
responsibility to the Victorian
Government, nor any special
reporting relationship.
The Governor in Council appointed
a panel of three administrators on 17
November 2009 on the advice of the
Minister for Local Government.
This panel was to be in place until the
Local Government elections in 2012.
In May 2012, the Victorian Government
extended the Administration of the
Brimbank City Council to March 2015 with
changes to the composition of the panel
taking place from October 2012.
In May 2014, the Victorian Government
introduced legislation into parliament
to further extend the term of
Administrators until October 2016,
aligning with state-wide Council elections.
John Tanner was appointed as an Administrator
on 11 March 2014, bringing extensive
experience in Local Government, small
business, and regional development.
He was a Commissioner of the Shire of Delatite
from 1994–1997 following amalgamations.
He is well regarded for his expertise in
community engagement, management,
governance, and strategic planning.
Brimbank Electronic Gambling Policy
2015–2019 (December 2014)
Council recognises the potential for significant
harm caused from electronic gaming products,
in particular electronic gaming machines (EGMs)
and the important role Local Government
plays in minimising the harm associated with
EGMs. This policy outlines Council’s approach to
managing the location and the social economic
impacts of EGMs.
Brimbank City Council’s Plan to
Prevent Men’s Violence Against
Women (2015–2019) (March 2015)
Council’s
Plan to Prevent Violence Against
Women
reaffirms Council’s long-term
commitment to address the underlying causes
of violence against women. Accountability to
actions outlined in this plan will be achieved
through ongoing monitoring and annual
reporting to Council and the community.
Brimbank Youth Strategy 2015–2019
(April 2015)
This four-year strategy was adopted to
address the needs of young people aged
12 to 25 years old, who live, work, study or
socialise in Brimbank. It is part of a longer-term
vision for Brimbank as a community of active
and connected young men and women with
opportunities, choices, and a strong sense
of belonging.
Brimbank City Council – Council Plan
2013–2017 (June 2015)
The updated
Brimbank City Council Plan
2013–2017
guides Council’s work to strengthen
community capacity, enhance urban and
public places, improve transport networks,
boost local economy and deliver responsive
and much needed community services.
Local Law No. 1, 2015
(Meeting Procedure) (June 2015)
The Meeting Procedure Local Law regulates
use of Council’s common seal, election of the
Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Chairs of Special
Committees, and governs the conduct of
meetings of the Council and its Committees.
To view these documents or other Council
plans, strategies, policies or guidelines,
visit
www.brimbank.vic.gov.au
About the Council
The Administrators act as members
of Council and govern on behalf of
the citizens of Brimbank.
Brimbank City Council operates
under the requirements of the
Local Government Act 1989
.
Brimbank City Council has an obligation
to achieve best value for its community
and stakeholders and to ensure the
community receives the most benefit
from available resources.
The
Council Plan
guides future planning in
Brimbank and establishes priorities for action.
Council’s annual planning process involves:
• Engaging with and seeking input
from the community
• Analysing social, political, economic
and natural environment factors
and influences setting the strategic
objectives of the Council
• Developing strategies to
achieve the objectives
Strategies, policies and plans adopted
Our Council
01
Introduction |
Strategies, policies and plans adopted | Our Council | The Brimbank Administrators Panel
• Establishing strategic indicators for
monitoring the achievement of the
objectives
• Determining financial and
non-financial resource requirements
• Coordinating the implementation
of strategies, and
• Monitoring, reporting, evaluating
and improving performance.
The Administrators are guided in their
decision-making by legislation and a range of
Council policies, including, but not limited to:
Lo
cal Government Act 1989
Planning and Environment Act 1987
Ro
ad Management Act 2004
Bri
mbank Council Plan 2013–2017
General Local Law 2008
Bri
mbank Community Plan 2009–2030
• Governance (Major Policy Consultation) 2014.
In June 2015 Council adopted a new local law,
Governance (Meeting Procedure) Local Law
No. 1, 2015. This law is intended to ensure
increased transparency of Council
decision-making and further enhance
its community consultation processes.
The purpose of this Local Law is to:
• Provide for the election of the Mayor
• Regulate the use of the common seal
• Provide for the procedures governing
the conduct of Council Meetings,
Special Committee meetings and
Advisory Committee meetings
• Set the rules of behaviour for those
participating in or present at Council
Meetings, Special Committee meetings,
Advisory Committee meetings, and
• Provide for the appointment of Councillors
as members of committees established by
the Council or as Council representatives
to external committees and organisations.
Council’s suite of plans, strategies and
policies are available to view on the
website,
www.brimbank.vic.gov.au
Jane Nathan was appointed as an Administrator
on 20 November 2012. She has a long and
successful association with Local Government.
She was a Commissioner of Brimbank City
Council following amalgamations in 1994, and
prior to that was a Councillor and Mayor for the
City of Hawthorn.
Jane is well known in the Local Government
sector, particularly for her skills and experience
in community relations and strategic planning.
Jane Nathan,
Administrator
M
0419 101 411
E
janen@brimbank.vic.gov.au
John Tanner,
Administrator
M
0409 417 849
E
johnt@brimbank.vic.gov.au
John Watson,
Chair
M
0419 984 675
E
johnw@brimbank.vic.gov.au
Mr John Watson is the Chair of the Panel
of Administrators.
He was appointed by the Governor in Council
on the advice of the Minister for Local
Government and commenced on 1 November
2012. Mr Watson worked previously as the
Executive Director of Local Government
Victoria, within the Department of Planning
and Community Development, since early 2007.
John has more than 40 years of experience
working with Local Government, including as Chief
Executive Officer of the Shire of Bulla, and the
Moonee Valley and Hume City Councils, and also
at the Victorian Government level, specialising
in the area of governance and legislation.
The Brimbank Administrators Panel
Brimbank’s Administrators are responsible for making decisions about local issues and ensuring the ongoing enhancement
of the liveability, productivity and sustainability of the City and for all members of the Brimbank community.
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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25
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2015
Bill Jaboor
Chief
Executive Officer
Paul Younis
Director Infrastructure
and Environment
Stephen Sully
Executive Officer,
Positioning Brimbank
Stephen Sully, previously General Manager
City Development, was appointed Executive
Offi cer Strategic Positioning in September
2012. In this role Stephen works with the Chief
Executive Offi cer and Council to advocate and
attract investment, development, facilities and
services to key locations of the municipality.
Stephen is an urban planner with over 30
years of professional experience. He has led
numerous planning and economic development
areas for local and Victorian Government.
Prior to joining Brimbank Stephen was director
of a private planning consultancy.
Bachelor of Arts Urban Studies.
Bill Jaboor was appointed Chief Executive
Offi cer of Brimbank City Council in 2012. He
has over 46 years of experience working in
diff erent roles within Local Government across
Victoria and Queensland, including a total of
21 years as CEO at the Cities of Brimbank,
Hobsons Bay, Greater Shepparton and Benalla.
Bill also has extensive experience across
industry, health and education. He is currently
Chair of the Western Melbourne Regional
Development Australia Committee and
Board Member of Community Chef. He is
also a Board Member of the Alpine Resorts
Co-ordinating Council and past Board
Member of the Port Phillip and Westernport
Catchment Management Authority.
Associate Diploma of Business Studies,
Bachelor of Arts, MBA, Harvard University
short course for State and Local Government
Executives, and Williamson Leadership Fellow.
Stuart Menzies
Director
City Development
Stuart Menzies is an urban planner with
25 years’ experience. Stuart joined Brimbank
City Council in 2005 and was appointed to the
position of Director City Development in June
2013. Prior to working with Brimbank, Stuart
held management roles at Yarra Ranges Shire
Council and Nillumbik Shire Council, and has
worked in China with Australian Volunteers
International advising on sustainability policy
and social impact assessment.
Stuart is a Vice President — Local Government
of the Planning Institute of Australia’s
Victorian Committee.
Bachelor of Applied Science (Planning),
Graduate Diploma in Public Policy,
Masters of Environmental Studies.
With over 30 years’ experience in Local
Government prior to coming to Brimbank
in November 2010, Helen Morrissey was the
General Manager of Corporate Services at
Maribyrnong City Council, and prior to that
had a variety of management roles in both
community services and corporate areas
at Darebin City Council.
Helen is responsible for the Corporate and
Community Relations Division that has a focus
on providing reliable, consistent value-adding
support to internal services across the Council
in a range of areas, enabling the organisation
to continuously improve and deliver effi cient
eff ective services whilst improving Council’s
relation with the community.
The Corporate and Community Relations
division incorporates the Governance,
Communications, Customer Service, Financial
Services, Procurement and Rating and Process
Management units, People and Performance,
IT Services and Business Transformation.
Graduate Diploma in Social Science, Diploma
Human Service Research & Evaluation,
Certifi cate of Marketing Practice.
Paul Younis commenced at Council in July 2010.
Paul has over 20 years’ experience in a range
of senior management positions.
Prior to joining Brimbank, Paul held the position
of Chief Executive Offi cer of Corangamite
Shire Council, and in 2014, Paul was seconded
for six months as Acting Chief Executive
Offi cer of Buloke Shire Council. Along with
experience in the water sector, Paul has
also worked for consulting engineering
companies based in Frankston and Mornington.
Bachelor of Civil Engineering,
Post Graduate qualifi cations in Law,
Graduate Diploma in Business.
Neil Whiteside
Director
Community Wellbeing
Helen Morrissey
Director Corporate and
Community Relations
Neil Whiteside has worked in Local Government
for over 15 years in various management roles.
Neil was appointed to the position of Director
Community Wellbeing in June 2013. Previously Neil
held the position of Group Manager Operations
at Council since January 2008. Prior to joining
Brimbank, Neil held several management
positions at Whittlesea City Council.
Masters in Environmental Science, Bachelor
of Education/Environmental Science (Neil is
currently completing a Masters of Public Policy
and Management).
02
Our People
24
| Dynamic Centre of the West
02
Our People |
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2015
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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27
As at 30 June 2015, Council employed 1,368 people (854 Full-Time Equivalent), which is a slight decrease
from 2013–2014.
Workforce turnover overall for the year increased slightly on the previous year, reaching 10 per cent, a one percentage point increase on 2013–2014.
The average age of Council’s workforce is 45.5 years. Sixteen per cent of Council employees are in the 61-plus age group, with these staff
predominantly employed as School Crossing Supervisors and within Council’s Operations Centre.
Organisation structure at 30 June 2015
Workforce profi le
MANAGER
COMMUNITY CARE
John MacDonagh
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
CEO
Bill Jaboor
DIRECTOR
COMMUNITY
WELLBEING
Neil Whiteside
DIRECTOR CITY
DEVELOPMENT
Stuart Menzies
DIRECTOR
INFRASTRUCTURE
AND ENVIRONMENT
Paul Younis
DIRECTOR
CORPORATE AND
COMMUNITY RELATIONS
Helen Morrissey
MANAGER LEISURE
SERVICES
Ashley Fleming
MANAGER LIBRARIES
AND LEARNING
Christine McAllister
MANAGER COMMUNITY
PLANNING AND
DEVELOPMENT
Kath Brackett
MANAGER
CITY STRATEGY
Leanne Deans
MANAGER BUILDING
AND DEVELOPMENT
COMPLIANCE
Ashley Hansen
MANAGER CITY
PLANNING
Kristen Gilbert
EXECUTIVE OFFICER
POSITIONING
BRIMBANK
Stephen Sully
MANAGER
ENGINEERING SERVICES
Adrian Ashford
MANAGER
URBAN DESIGN
Adrian Gray
ACTING MANAGER
ENVIRONMENT
Matthew Aquilina
GROUP MANAGER
OPERATIONS
Tom Razmovski
MANAGER PEOPLE
AND PERFORMANCE
Helen Lawless
MANAGER
FINANCIAL SERVICES
Jacqueline Vanderholt
MANAGER
GOVERNANCE
Melanie Fleer
MANAGER REVENUE
AND QUALITY SYSTEMS
Peter Horne
MANAGER MEDIA
AND
COMMUNICATIONS
Rebecca Solomon
CHIEF FINANCIAL
STRATEGIST
Shane Marr
MANAGER
PROPERTY
Trent Prince
MANAGER
ASSET SERVICES
Dominic Di Martino
MANAGER CITY
COMPLIANCE
Herb Horell
MANAGER
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
Paul Tate
MANAGER
PROCUREMENT AND
TENDERING
Pauline Hassakis
Employees by division and employment status
Division
Status
Female
Male
Total
CEO
Full-Time
1
1
2
Part-Time
0
1
1
Casual
0
0
0
Corporate & Community Relations
Full-Time
62
25
87
Part-Time
25
4
29
Casual
0
1
1
Infrastructure & Environment
Full-Time
26
256
282
Part-Time
12
6
18
Casual
0
0
0
City Development
Full-Time
28
36
64
Part-Time
51
70
121
Casual
13
12
25
Community Wellbeing
Full-Time
108
36
144
Part-Time
314
74
388
Casual
145
61
206
Brimbank total
785
583
1,368
Council Staff
Age groups
Age
Female Male Total
<21
24
33
57
21 – 25
55
39
94
26 – 30
52
40
92
31 – 35
72
52
124
36 – 40
73
60
133
41 – 45
109
61
170
46 – 50
103
60
163
51 – 55
108
53
161
56 – 60
92
57
149
61>
96
129
225
Brimbank total employment status
Status
2014–2015
Casual
232
Full-time
579
Part-time
557
Total
1,368
02
Our People |
Organisation structure at 30 June 2015 | Workforce profi le
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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29
Enterprise Bargaining Agreement
An Enterprise Bargaining Committee comprising
management representatives, nominated
workplace union delegates and union industrial
officers was established to negotiate a new
Enterprise Agreement for Council employees.
As a result, a new Enterprise Agreement was
successfully negotiated and approved by Fair Work
Australia, with an operative date of 4 February
2015 for a period until 28 February 2018.
Preventing Violence Against Women
Brimbank City Council recognises that family
violence, including men’s violence against
women and children, is a serious and pervasive
issue in Australia; the health, social and
economic costs of family violence are profound.
In 2014–2015, Council actively worked to
advance gender equity and prevent men’s
violence against women in the municipality.
During this period, the Council used lessons
learnt from implementing the
Family Violence
Prevention Action Plan (2010–2013)
, and
evidence in the literature to develop Brimbank
City Council’s
Plan to Prevent Men’s Violence
Against Women: Towards Gender Equity
(2015–2019)
, which was adopted in March 2015.
A Reference Group of internal and external
representatives was established to provide
advice and feedback to guide development
of the new plan. Council consulted more
than 80 internal and external partners over
a six-month period. Two community and
stakeholder consultation forums were held
to assist in drafting the Brimbank Gender
Equity vision. Consultation reinforced the
need for Council to prioritise its effort on
actions to enhance gender equity and
prevent men’s violence against women.
Council’s
Plan to Prevent Men’s Violence Against
Women: Towards Gender Equity (2015–2019)
sets out a bold and innovative approach for the
delivery of Council’s actions to enhance gender
equity and primary prevention of men’s violence
against women in the municipality. It outlines
Council’s commitment to preventing men’s
violence against women, directed by the vision
that ‘Brimbank is a gender equitable city where
women live free from violence’.
Key themes to guide Council’s action to tackle
underlying causes of violence against women
over the next four years are:
• Promoting equal and respectful relationships
between women and men
• Promoting non-violent, gender equitable
and inclusive organisational, cultural and
social norms
• Promoting a culture of non-violence.
Other activities the Council was involved
in during the 2014–2015 period included:
• Community awareness activities on
preventing men’s violence against women
during the International Day For Elimination
Of Violence Against Women/White Ribbon
Day on 25 November 2014
• Submission to the Royal Commission
into Family Violence in May 2015
• Contributing to the implementation of
Preventing Violence Together United
project, which brings together 16 agencies
across north-western region of Melbourne
to build organisational capacity to prevent
men’s violence against women by tackling
the causes and key determinants of gender
inequity in the West.
• Participating in the Municipal Association of
Victoria forums on preventing men’s violence
against women.
Other staff matters
A summary of the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff categorised by employment classification and gender is set out below.
Type
Gender
Infrastructure
& Environment
FTE
City
Development
FTE
Corporate &
Community
Relations FTE
CEO
FTE
Community
Wellbeing
FTE
Grand
Total
Full-Time
Female
24
27
59
1
104
215
Male
256
36
25
1
36
354
Part-Time
Female
7
13
16
0
167
203
Male
3
15
4
1
27
50
Casual
Female
0
3
0
0
19
22
Male
0
2
1
0
7
10
Total
290
96
105
3
360
854
Note:
Casuals recorded as 0.03 of FTE. Council has 232 casuals that are contracted to five hours per week, which brings FTE for casuals down
A summary of the number of full time equivalent (FTE) Council staff by organisational structure, employment type and gender is set out below.
Employment
Classification
Female
FTE
Male
FTE
Total
FTE
Band 1
20
58
79
Band 2
27
47
74
Band 3
13
20
33
Band 4
65
13
78
Band 5
76
34
110
Band 6
73
36
110
Band 7
44
71
115
Band 8
18
27
45
other
104
106
210
Total
440
414
854
Brimbank has an internal e-learning Equal
Opportunity (EO) training program that focuses
on the policies and procedures relating to EO.
In addition, field-based employees who do not
have access to a computer received formal
classroom training on EO. For both platforms,
employees are required to complete an
assessment in addition to signing a statement
of attestation.
Council promotes equity and diversity
outcomes to ensure an inclusive workplace
culture and EO, and recognises the importance
of equity and diversity to optimise our service
design and delivery to the broader community.
The Brimbank Leadership Essentials Program
includes a module on Diversity @ Work. In this
program the focus is on unconscious bias,
gender, diversity and inclusion, inter-cultural
communication, disability awareness and
inter-generational awareness. This module
is also made available more broadly to all staff
via the Corporate Training Calendar.
The indicators that measure the effectiveness
of Council’s EO Program and the results for the
year are:
• Indicator: percentage of new employees
receiving equal opportunity training
within six months of commencement.
Target: 100 per cent. Result: 95 per cent
• Indicator: percentage of existing employees
receiving refresher equal opportunity
training at least every two years.
Target: 100 per cent. Result: 87 per cent
• Indicator: number of contact officers
per number of council employees.
Target: 1:50. Result: 1:73
Workforce profile (continued)
Equal Opportunity
Note:
Casuals recorded as 0.03 of FTE. Council has 232 casuals that are contracted to five hours per week, which brings FTE for casuals down
02
Our People |
Workforce profile | Equal Opportunity | Other staff matters
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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31
Council recognises the importance of all new
staff receiving a comprehensive induction to
Council on commencement, ensuring they
understand:
• Council functions, processes and policies
• The requirements of their role and the
functions of the directorate where they work
• The policies and procedures that apply to
their behaviour and performance in the
workplace.
To assist with this, all staff must complete a
four-step Brimbank Induction Program. This
includes the commencement kit provided with
the letter of offer, the first day departmental
induction checklist, online Community First
induction and the formal corporate induction.
As part of the on boarding process, new
employees are given access to ‘Welcome to
Brimbank’ — an interactive program designed
to provide newly recruited employees with
information on Brimbank City Council, our
Community First culture and the benefits of
working at Brimbank.
The formal, one-day Corporate Induction
Program continued to run on a monthly basis
and was revamped to ensure a more interactive,
informative and engaging session to formally
welcome new employees to Council. The
corporate induction, coupled with Council’s
eLearning modules, aim to pass on vital
information to new employees as well
as meet statutory compliance obligations.
Leadership Essentials
The Brimbank Leadership Essentials program
is targeted at new or aspirational leaders,
and has been designed to have an immediate
impact on individuals as it brings theory and
work related experience together. It is practical,
contemporary and focuses on both personal
and professional development.
The program looks at the real issues occurring
in the workplace and assists participants
in discovering relevant solutions to these
issues. The program confirms the need for
a professional and productive workplace
and aims to provide ways to create a more
positive culture. It also assists participants in
establishing strategies for the implementation
of their learning back into their workplaces.
The program provides an opportunity to gain
in-depth knowledge of business functions
and build foundational skills to integrate these
functions into the organisation, examine new
techniques and technologies for driving results,
identifying problems and formulating solutions,
and adapting to change and expand capacity to
lead cross-functional initiatives.
The program has been aligned so that upon
completion, participating staff gain a Diploma
of Management through Victoria University.
Base units are facilitated formally and core
electives are completed using Recognition
of Prior Learning.
Upon commencement of the program in
March 2014, 63 employees have completed the
program and 62 employees have successfully
obtained the Diploma of Management. The
Leadership Essentials Program will undergo
realignment to new government standards and
will recommence in the first quarter of 2016.
Occupational Health and Safety
Council continued to develop and implement an
extensive OHS Management System that aims
to prevent injury to employees, contractors,
volunteers and members of the public.
The key areas focused on in 2014–2015
included the following:
• Updated Council’s OHS Policy reaffirming the
organisational commitment by the Executive
Management Team. The policy and Council’s
commitment to OHS will continue to be
communicated to all relevant stakeholders
• Council continued its proactive health
and wellbeing activities to reduce the
likelihood of employee health being
negatively affected by workplace and
non-workplace related harm
• Continued implementation of the Incident
Reporting and Injury Management System,
ensuring incidents are investigated and
corrective actions identified and managed
to minimise the likelihood of workplace
hazards and incidents resulting in injuries
• Monitored Council processes ensuring OHS
legislative compliance and best practice
across the organisation
• Continued to implement successful
Return to Work Initiatives
• Council conducted and developed an
OHS training needs analysis to identify
the OHS training requirements across
the organisation
• The Executive Management Team
endorsed the OHS Strategic and
Governance Framework, which included
the establishment of the OHS Executive
Safety Council and the development
of an OHS Strategic Plan.
Key Performance Indicators and Workers’ Compensation
Year
Lost time
injuries
WorkCover
claims
Days lost due to
workplace injuries
2015
21
34
986
2014
24
37
973
2013
18
30
1,568
2012
31
46
1,346
2011
21
34
1,302
2010
28
53
1,481
2009
25
36
1,942
2008
32
49
722
Days lost by division
City Development
51 days
Community Wellbeing
200 days
Infrastructure & Environment
735 days
Governance & Community Relations
0 days
Total days lost:
986 days
Learning and development
Employee development is a key focus for
Council, with a suite of programs offered
across the organisation to meet behavioural,
technical and compliance obligations as well as
enhance the knowledge, skill, experience and
competency of our employees.
Development is delivered formally, self-paced
or via Brimbank’s own e-learning tool bTrain.
Modules are made available to staff to learn at
their own pace, at their convenience. Modules
on bTrain include Equal Opportunity, Fraud and
Corruption Awareness and TRIM – Council’s
Information Management system.
A total of 63 corporate training calendar
courses were coordinated in 2014–2015 with
131 sessions and a total of 1,777 participants.
In addition, two Leadership Essentials Programs
were facilitated which saw 36 participants
achieve a Diploma in Management.
Learning programs offered took into
consideration departmental, interpersonal
and organisational needs to help employees
meet Council’s objectives.
Some of the key programs included:
• Leadership Essentials
• Managing Aggressive Behaviour
• Myers Briggs
• Working Together
• Communicating with Others
• Corporate Induction
• Equal Opportunity
• Fraud Awareness
• iPad & You
• Project Management
• Contract Management
• Effective Time Management
• Occupational Health and Safety (OHS)
• Emotional Intelligence
• i.d. consulting
• PRINCE2 Project Management
• Business Writing Skills
• Diversity @ Work
• Aggression & Negotiation Skills.
The number of claims lodged decreased in 2014–2015, with a marginal increase on lost time
injuries and number of days lost. Of the 34 claims lodged, 18 were minor and 13 resulted in no days
lost. The overall number of days lost is comparable with last year. Council continued with its early
intervention Return to Work initiatives of onsite physiotherapy consultancy, off site physiotherapy
treatment, and working closely with managers to facilitate immediate return to work programs.
These initiatives resulted in a significant reduction in days lost compared to 2013–2014, which also
significantly decreased Council’s WorkCover Premium.
Other staff matters (continued)
Workplace Health and Wellbeing
A healthy workplace influences workers and
can have a positive effect on the health and
wellbeing of families and communities.
Council continued its proactive health and
wellbeing initiative by providing a range of
programs that aim to support and promote
the health and wellbeing of employees.
These programs aim to enhance and proactively
improve overall fitness of employees, focusing
on injury prevention and reducing the negative
impacts on business.
The program was introduced in 2014–2015 to
address manual handling education in high-risk
areas. The program introduced participants to
the benefits of a healthy lifestyle and provided
a practical exercise strengthening program
designed to reduce injuries.
The program has contributed to a reduction
in workplace injuries and long-term injury
management practices, and has had a positive
impact on the physical and mental health of
employees, promoting healthy behaviours.
Other initiatives included:
• Audiometric testing for employees
working in high noise roles
• Health & Wellness Strengthening Program
• Injury Management Early
Intervention Program
• Sons of the West program
• Immunisation program flu vaccinations
• beyondblue Programs
• Diabetes Wellness program.
Council awarded a new provider for Council’s
Employee Assistance Program on 1 September
2014. Employees and their immediate families
have access to confidential counselling and
support to address work and/or personal issues
that may be impacting productivity, morale
and wellbeing.
OHS performance
Council is committed to a positive and safe work
culture. Any incidents deemed notifiable were
reported to WorkSafe.
Proactive incident management has allowed
Council to enhance its OHS Management
Systems, ensuring a safer workplace for
employees and continual improvement to
Council systems and processes.
WorkSafe conducted a Proactive Intervention
Program, focusing on healthcare and social
assistance attending six sites across the
organisation. WorkSafe was satisfied with
Council processes and procedures in place.
02
Our People |
Other staff matters
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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33
• A Council Plan within the six months
after each general election or by
30 June, whichever is later
• A Strategic Resource Plan for a period
of at least four years and include this
in the council plan
• A Budget for each fi nancial year
• An Annual Report in respect
of each fi nancial year.
The following diagram shows the relationships
between the key planning and reporting
documents that make up the planning
and accountability framework for Local
Government. It also shows that there are
opportunities for community and stakeholder
input and feedback at each stage of the
planning and reporting cycle.
Brimbank’s integrated planning framework
ensures that strategic and fi nancial resources
are aligned in order to deliver the Council Plan.
Engaging with and consulting the community
is a vital element of this process.
03
Our
Performance
32
| Dynamic Centre of the West
Planning and Accountability Framework
Brimbank Community Plan
The
Brimbank Community Plan 2009–2030
(updated 2013) describes the community’s
vision and long-term priorities for the next 20
years and establishes a shared basis for joint
planning, service delivery and advocacy.
The plan has been shaped by an intensive
community consultation process that
explored the community’s understanding of
the strengths within the community and the
opportunities for improvement, and came up
with a vision for the future.
Council Budget
The Annual Budget documents the fi nancial
resources required to implement the key
activities identifi ed in the Council Plan that
will be undertaken in order to achieve Council’s
strategic objectives.
03
Our Performance |
Planning and Accountability Framework
Community engagement
and consultation
The community’s involvement in planning
and policy development, service delivery and
advocacy is supported by increasing community
awareness and education and opportunities
for community members to be consulted and
involved in all aspects of community life. The
information gathered is also used to develop
the strategies and commitments in the Council
Plan. For more information, see the Advocacy,
Consultation and Community Engagement
section on page 70.
Council Plan
The Council Plan is one of Brimbank’s primary
strategic documents.
The Council Plan 2013–2017
(updated 2014)
outlines Council’s strategic
directions and focus for the next four years.
It also details the objectives and key actions
that are to be completed over the 2014–2015
fi nancial year in order to achieve these
directions, as well as measures to monitor
performance in delivering services to the
community and fulfi ll Council’s commitment
to ongoing improvement.
It is the 2014–2015 performance that is
reported in this Annual Report.
The
Council Plan 2013–2017
includes strategic
objectives, strategies for achieving these
for the four-year period, strategic indicators
for monitoring achievement of the strategic
objectives and a Strategic Resource Plan.
The following are the six strategic objectives
as detailed in the Council Plan.
>>>
>
>
>
Year End
Accountability
Audited Statements
30 years +
Long Term Planning
{
Community Plan
Medium Term Planning
and Sustainability
4 years
{
Council Plan
12 months
Short Term Planning
{
Budget
{
Community vision, Mission, Values,
Long term fi nancial plan, Asset management plan
Strategic objectives, Strategies, Strategic indicators,
Strategic resource plan, (incl, Standard statements)
Standard statements, Activities & initiatives,
Key strategic activities, Other information
Standard statements, Financial statements,
Performance statement
>
Brimbank’s planning framework
The
Local Government Act 1989
requires councils to prepare the following planning and reporting documents:
Time horizon
Medium term
Short term
Planning
Reporting
Timing
Council plan
• Strategic objectives
• Strategies
• Strategic indicators
Stakeholder
and
community
engagement
Annual report
• Report of
op erations
• Financial
statements
• Performance
statement
Strategic resource plan
• Financial statements
• Statements of
non-fi nancial resources
Budget
• Services and initiatives
• Service outcome indicators
• Major initiatives
• Financial statements
Jan – Jun
Feb – Jun
Mar – Jun
Jul – Sep
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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35
Brimbank City Council is committed
to promoting the long-term sustainable
development of the municipality
Brimbank City Council is committed to the
ongoing delivery of a broad range of services
that meet the needs and aspirations of the
diverse and growing Brimbank community
Brimbank City Council is committed
to providing local employment and business
development opportunities whilst also ensuring
that such activities do not have a detrimental
impact on local communities
Brimbank City Council
is committed to working in close
collaboration with the community
04
Sustainable
environments
06
Organisational
effectiveness
05
Industry and
economic development
and strategic sites
01
Council and the
community working
together
Council Plan
Council will do this by facilitating a dynamic and accessible environment that is supported by a healthy and informed community that enjoys rich
environmental characteristics within the municipality. Council is committed to environmental protection, planning for sustainable developments,
improving the sustainability of our building stock, and reducing our ecological footprint.
• Reducing the city’s ecological footprint
• Protecting and enhancing our natural environment
• Fostering sustainable urban development.
Guided by the Australian Business Excellence Framework, the ongoing development of our staff is a critical element to our continuous
improvement of service delivery. We will continue to benchmark services to ensure best practice, lead by example, and implement best
practice services to the community.
• Developing our people
• Creating a high performance organisation through continuous improvement.
Brimbank City Council is committed
to creating an enhanced quality
of healthy and active community life
02
Community
wellbeing
Our rich cultures are celebrated, embraced and connected to the broader community. Within a strong foundation of social justice, Council is
committed to the provision of affordable services and community infrastructure that builds healthy people and communities through education,
recreation, arts and culture and sport.
• Creating connected, supported and welcoming communities
• Celebrating our history creativity and diversity
• Creating healthy, safe communities
• Creating a community of lifelong learners
• Building economically sustainable communities.
Brimbank City Council
is committed to fostering strong
pride for residents and visitors
03
Urban design and
infrastructure
Council creates an urban environment that is attractive, clean and green and which improves living and housing, business and recreational
opportunities, demonstrates environmental leadership and fosters a sustainable economy. Council is also committed to developing its town
centres and its smaller urban villages, across the municipality, as a network of safe, attractive, vibrant, liveable and prosperous places that
provide accessible retail, business, community, social activities, employment and residential opportunities.
• Contributing to an accessible, connected city
• Enhancing the character and identity of our city
• Providing a range of places for people to play, relax and meet
• Ensure that there are sustainable plans for the management of Brimbank’s physical assets.
The municipality contains a range of strategic sites (outside of Town Centres or Urban villages) that, due to their location, size, environment
or current or past use, can greatly assist Council achieve its economic, social or environmental objectives.
• Promoting and advocating for the appropriate recognition, development and use of Brimbank’s strategic sites
• Increasing local employment, business, office and economic development
• Facilitating future industrial, commercial or residential development at strategic sites.
Council facilitates a wide cross-section of community participation, including ‘hard to reach’ groups, through a variety of forums and partnerships
to better engage, develop, represent, and communicate with our diverse community. Brimbank City Council will fulfil its statutory and legal
obligations to the community and manage the municipality in a financially sustainable manner to meet the current needs of our community
and those of future generations.
• Developing leadership in the community
• Governing responsibly and community advocacy
• Keeping the community informed and involved
• Working in partnership
• Responsible financial management.
03
Our Performance |
Council Plan
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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37
Strategic Objective 1:
Council and the community working together
Strategic Indicator / Measure
Result
Comments
Developing leadership in the community
Actively promote the roles and skills of Community
Resource Members across relevant Council work areas
to ensure their participation in local projects.
59
The number of Community Resource Members and the
number of participative projects in which they were involved
both increased between 2013–2014 and 2014–2015.
Governing responsibly and community advocacy
Resident perception of Council performance
on lobbying on the behalf of the community.
54
This score is below target, but in line
with average state-wide scores.
Resident perception that Council
is generally heading in the right direction.
57
This score is below target but is in line
with metro Melbourne and state-wide scores.
Keeping the community informed and involved
Resident perception of Council performance
on community consultation and engagement.
58
This score is above target and in line
with metro Melbourne, and above state-wide scores.
Resident perception of Council performance
on informing the community.
61
This score is below target, but in line
with average state-wide scores.
Working in partnership
Number of meetings with the Sunshine, Sydenham
and St Albans Town Centre Partnership Groups.
9
Target achieved.
Responsible financial management
Debt servicing ratio.
1.00%
Target achieved.
Adjusted Working Capital Ratio.
291.72%
Target achieved.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Council’s performance for the 2014–2015 year has been reported against each strategic objective
to demonstrate how Council is performing in achieving the
Council Plan 2013–2017
.
Performance has been measured as follows:
• Results achieved in relation to the strategic indicators in the Council Plan
• Progress in relation to the major initiatives identified in the Budget
• Services funded in the Budget and the persons or sections of the community who are provided those services
• Results against the prescribed service performance indicators and measures.
Performance
Major Initiatives
Progress
Deliver Council’s Community Governance training program to community groups,
small not for profit organisations and interested individuals across Brimbank to
support good governance practice in community organisations.
Completed.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2014–2015 Budget for the year.
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
Governance
Governance includes three areas:
Council Business
• Council meeting support (agendas and minutes);
• Administrative support;
• Ensuring Council compliance to a range of legislation;
• Management and investigation of complaints relating to statutory breaches and Coordination
of proposals for place and street name changes within the municipality; and
• Legal advice.
Audit
• Oversees internal risk and control regime; and
• Conducting internal fraud and risk management audits in accordance with Annual Plan.
Risk Management
• Insurance premiums and management of insurance claims.
5,568 5,722 154
Media and
Communications
Responsible for the provision of timely information to the community, and:
• Media liaison – managing the organisation’s relationship with the media;
• Publications – producing Council’s corporate publications;
• Corporate Communications – developing, coordinating, and advising on Council’s communication
and consultation strategies and direction;
• Graphic design – producing high quality design in Council documents;
• Managing and updating Council’s website;
• Managing advertising;
• Speech writing; and
• Keeping the community informed and promoting Brimbank.
2,176 2,288 112
Financial
Services
Responsible for providing a fully integrated financial service across Council. Key functions include:
• Coordinating budget information from Service Units in order to develop a Council Budget;
• Preparation of Annual Financial Statements and various other Statutory Returns;
• Support to Service Units with financial analysis of their business to help support business decisions;
• Prompt payments to suppliers;
• Prompt payment of Employees’ salaries and wages;
• Monitoring of Council’s cash and investment of Council’s funds in order to maximise interest
earnings; and
• Ensuring compliance with Legislation, Industry Awards and Accounting Standards.
2,822 3,129 307
Procurement
and Tendering
Provides centralised management of the procurement policy and procedures.
Key responsibilities include:
• A centralised tendering coordination function;
• Provision of training and system administration for Council’s procurement systems/software;
• Provision of assistance in procurement matters across all Service Units;
• Management of Council’s procurement procedures and processes for the purchasing of goods
and services; and
• Governance of procurement and tendering processes.
1,197 1,203 6
Property
Services
Provides strategic advice on Council’s property portfolio, manages the Facilities Asset
Management Plan, develops lease documentation and manages lease negotiations.
The Property Department also manages the capital works program for facilities
and ensures that approved major building and construction projects are delivered.
1,879 1,648 (231)
Revenue
and Process
Management
Responsible for valuing all properties within the municipality, raising annual rates
and charges and for the collection of revenue. Also responsible for management
of Council’s policies and procedures system.
1,833 1,966 133
Customer
Relations
Provides a professional customer focused service through call centres and front desks
(face-to-face interactions).
3,694 2,884 (810)
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2014–15 budget and the persons or sections of the
community who are provided the service.
03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 1: Council and the community working together
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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39
Service / Indicator / Measure
Result
Material Variations
Governance
Appropriateness
Transparency
Council decisions made at meetings closed to the public
[Number of Council resolutions made at ordinary or special meetings of Council,
or at meetings of a special committee consisting only of Councillors, closed to
the public/number of Council resolutions made at ordinary or special meetings
of Council or at meetings of a special committee consisting only of Councillors ] x100
0.63%
No Material Variations
Consultation and engagement
Satisfaction with community consultation and engagement
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how Council
has performed on community consultation and engagement]
58
No Material Variations
Quality
Attendance
Councillor attendance at council meetings
[The sum of the number of Councillors who attended each ordinary and special Council
meeting/(number of ordinary and special Council meetings) × (number of Councillors
elected at the last Council general election)] x100
94.20%
No Material Variations
Cost
Service cost
Cost of governance
[Direct cost of the governance service/number of Councillors
elected at the last Council general election]
$161,679.00 No Material Variations
Service outcome
Satisfaction
Satisfaction with Council decisions
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how council has performed
in making decisions in the interest of the community]
55
No Material Variations
The following statement provides the results of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation
of material variations.
Strategic Objective 2:
Community Wellbeing
Strategic Indicator / Measure
Result
Comments
Creating connected, supported
and welcoming communities
Resident perception about Council’s
general town planning policy.
71
This score is above target and in line with metro
Melbourne and state-wide average scores.
Celebrating our history creativity and diversity
Resident perception about Council performance
on community and cultural activities.
65
This score is above target, but is below metro
Melbourne and state-wide average scores.
Creating a community of lifelong learners
Resident perception about Council
performance on art centres and libraries.
68
This score is below target and is below metro
Melbourne and state-wide scores.
Building economically sustainable communities
Resident perception about Council performance
on business and community development and tourism.
59
This score is above target, but is below metro
Melbourne and state-wide scores.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Major Initiatives
Progress
Design and develop a new Brimbank Community and Civic Centre in Sunshine.
In progress.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2014–2015 budget for the year.
03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 2: Community Wellbeing
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Brimbank City Council
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Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
Community
Planning and
Development
The Community Planning and Development Department is responsible for the following
key service areas:
Arts and Culture
Develops and delivers arts short courses, exhibition programs and artists’ studios to support
creativity in Brimbank. It maintains and expands the indoor art collection and public art to increase
vibrancy in local areas and public spaces. Festivals and event management increases celebrations
of Council’s diversity and heritage.
Community Development
Supports community development through community leadership programs, Brimbank
Leadership Alumni, community grants, facilitation of volunteering opportunities
in Brimbank and coordination of Neighbourhood Houses and activities in local areas.
Council currently manages Neighbourhood Houses in Cairnlea, Delahey, Sydenham,
West Sunshine and Westvale. It also has a partnership agreement with community
managed Neighbourhood Houses to increase strategic planning and promotion.
Community Planning
Supports community planning through population and data analysis, effective research
and evaluation, the implementation and review of the Community Plan, Council Plan and
action plans to support cultural diversity and reconciliation.
Social and Health Policy
Supports the development of a socially just and healthy community through the implementation
of a Social Justice Charter, Social Justice Coalition and policy development and review such as
language services, housing, gambling, family violence, healthy eating, drug and alcohol use
and mental health. The Municipal Health and Wellbeing Plan is integrated into the Brimbank
Community Plan in recognition of the contributions of all environments to health and wellbeing.
7,220 7,533 313
Community
Care
Provides a number of services to support community wellbeing including:
Ageing and Inclusion
Provides a range of services to support, maintain and enhance the physical,
social and emotional well-being of its clients, including:
• Home care: personal, home care, property maintenance / garden care, planned activity groups,
respite care and delivered meals;
• Community transport: seniors support, community register and volunteer coordination.
Families and Early Years
Oversees the delivery of a range of early childhood and family services as following:
• Children’s Services and Family Services.
Council undertakes and facilitates planning and development of early childhood opportunities
that benefit the health and wellbeing of children and families in Brimbank. Council also provides
support to playgroups, preschools and child care services throughout the municipality.
• Maternal and Child Health
Council provides a universal primary care service for families with children aged from birth to
school age. The service also provides intensive support for vulnerable families experiencing
significant parenting difficulties.
• Pre School Services
Seeks to further children’s social, emotional, physical and intellectual development in the year
before they start primary school.
Youth Services
Provides services that are aimed at strengthening, protecting and building resilience in young
people so that they face the challenges of adolescence and adulthood.
10,732 10,959 227
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
Library
Services
Libraries and learning includes:
Community Programs and Engagement
The provision of programs and learning opportunities that support; early years learning, school
years, skills for employment, digital literacy, social connectedness, english literacy skills and a
reading culture.
Library Service Points
The libraries are community hubs that provide access to library collections, computers and the
internet, wireless internet access, staff assistance with information retrieval and computers,
spaces for study and recreation.
Virtual Library
Access to online resources, services and programs via the library website.
6,817 7,003 186
Leisure
Services
Leisure Services is responsible for four key areas:
Sport & Recreation
Management of the seasonal and casual allocation of grounds and actively works
with clubs and community members. The unit supports clubs through training and
other capacity building programs.
Community Facilities
Management of community bookings and administration of community facilities such
as the Errington Community Centre and supports the groups using those facilities.
Council, through its Community Facilities Unit, plans and delivers community
infrastructure needed to strengthen local communities
(e.g. community hubs, and sporting and recreation facilities).
Leisure Planning & Policy
Undertakes research and consultation to plan for the development of sport and recreation
projects throughout the municipality. It provides information on needs and recommends
priorities for future capital works.
Leisure Centres:
Council has four leisure facilities:
1. The Keilor Basketball/Netball Stadium
2. Keilor public Golf Course
3. St Albans Leisure Centre
4. Sunshine Leisure Centre.
These facilities provide affordable opportunities for residents and others to engage in healthy
physical activity of fitness, sport and social activities.
6,778 6,559 219
03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 2: Community Wellbeing
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2014–2015 Budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are provided the service.
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Service / Indicator / Measure
Result
Material Variations
Aquatic Facilities
Quality
Service standard
Health inspections of aquatic facilities
[Number of authorised officer inspections of Council
aquatic facilities/number of Council aquatic facilities]
4.00
No Material Variations
Service standard
Reportable safety incidents at aquatic facilities
[Number of WorkSafe reportable aquatic facility safety incidents]
0.00
No WorkSafe notifiable incidents
occurred during the reporting
period 1 July 14 to 30 June 15.
Aquatic facilities staff undertake
regular training and have systems
of work in place to minimise the
likelihood of an incident occurring.
Cost
Service cost
Cost of indoor aquatic facilities
[Direct cost of indoor aquatic facilities less income
received/number of visits to indoor aquatic facilities]
$4.83
No Material Variations
Service outcome
Utilisation
Utilisation of aquatic facilities
[Number of visits to aquatic facilities / municipal population]
2.78
Visitation numbers have been
affected by pool closures due
to maintenance.
Home and Community Care
Quality
Service standard
Compliance with Community Care Common Standards
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how Council
has performed on community consultation and engagement]
100.00
No Material Variations
Service outcome
Participation
Participation in HACC service
[Number of people that received a HACC service / municipal
target population for HACC services] x100
12.81%
No Material Variations
Participation
Participation in HACC service by Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
(CALD) people
[Number of CALD people who receive a HACC service / municipal target
population in relation to CALD people for HACC services] x100
12.20%
No Material Variations
The following statement provides the results of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation
of material variations.
Service / Indicator / Measure
Result
Material Variations
Libraries
Appropriateness
Utilisation
Library collection usage
[Number of library collection item loans / number of library collection items]
4.96
No Material Variations
Quality
Resource standard
Standard of library collection
[Number of library collection items purchased in the last 5 years
/ number of library collection items] x100
73.60%
No Material Variations
Cost
Service cost
Cost of library service
[Direct cost of the library service / number of visits]
$5.91
No Material Variations
Service outcome
Participation
Active library members
[Number of active library members / municipal population] x100
16.54%
No Material Variations
Maternal and Child Health (MCH)
Appropriateness
Satisfaction
Participation in first MCH home visit
[Number of first MCH home visits / number of birth notifications received] x100
100.30%
No Material Variations
Quality
Service standard
Infant enrolments in MCH service
[Number of infants enrolled in the MCH service (from birth notifications received)
/ number of birth notifications received] x100
94.20%
No Material Variations
Service outcome
Participation
Participation in the MCH service
[Number of children who attend the MCH service at least once (in the year)
/ number of children enrolled in the MCH service] x100
72.46%
No Material Variations
Participation
Participation in MCH service by Aboriginal children
[Number of Aboriginal children who attend the MCH service at least once
(in the year) / number of Aboriginal children enrolled in the MCH service] x100
68.29%
No Material Variations
03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 2: Community Wellbeing
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Brimbank City Council
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Strategic Objective 3:
Urban Design and Infrastructure
Strategic Indicator / Measure
Result
Comments
Enhancing the character and identity of our city
Resident perception of Council performance around
condition of local streets and footpaths.
76
This score is above target and above metro Melbourne and
state-wide average scores.
Resident perception of Council performance
on the appearance of public areas.
62
This score is above target, but is below metro Melbourne and
state-wide average scores.
Providing a range of places for people to play,
relax and meet
Resident perception of Council’s performance
on recreational facilities.
66
This score is below target, and is below metro
Melbourne and state-wide scores.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Major Initiatives
Progress
Implement the Road Asset Management Plan through the delivery
of a $16.9 million road rehabilitation and upgrade program.
Completed.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2014–2015 budget for the year.
03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 3: Urban Design and Infrastructure
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
Engineering
Services
The Engineering Services Department is responsible for the following services:
Asset Management
• Development and implementation of Road Asset Management Plan;
• Development and implementation of Stormwater Asset Management Plan;
• Footpath maintenance program and inspections; and
• Construction management of capital works footpath and kerb.
Strategic Engineering
• Co-ordination of capital works planning and delivery;
• Pavement management system coordination;
• Transport planning;
• Strategic capital planning;
• Traffic Management;
• Infrastructure Development;
• Subdivision Approvals; and
• Project Services.
7,604 7,203 (401)
Environment
Ensures that the City’s environment has a strategic direction, is responsive to changing needs
and focuses on long-term sustainability. The Environment unit provides leadership, education,
coordination and project management roles in various environmental matters. In addition
it aims to engage the community in the conservation, management and restoration of
Brimbank’s natural areas, including grasslands, waterways and rocky escarpments.
2,146 2,445 299
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
Operations
The Operations Group is responsible for the following key service areas:
Operations Management and Administration
Responsible for the emergency management and the overall co-ordination
and administration of the following operational departments:
• Operations Centre Management;
• Building Maintenance;
• Fleet Services;
• Park Services;
• Road and Cleansing Services; and
• Waste Services.
Building Maintenance
Responsible for the following key service areas:
• Programmed and response maintenance and minor upgrades of municipal buildings, toilets
and facilities throughout the municipality, including mechanical equipment and pest control;
• Programmed and response maintenance of playgrounds, street furniture, flags and banners,
park furniture and fencing;
• Graffiti removal; and
• Supervision of Council’s security contract and cleaning contract for numerous sites.
Fleet Services
Responsible for the management, servicing and maintenance of Council’s entire fleet,
including leased and Council owned vehicles, plant and equipment.
Parks Services
Responsible for park, street tree, sports ground, streetscape and Keilor Public Golf Course
maintenance. Also responsible for the maintenance of the grounds of Council facilities.
Roads and Cleansing
Responsible for the maintenance and upkeep of Council’s road and drainage network
and associated infrastructure as per Council’s Road Asset Management Plan and the
overall cleanliness of Council land.
Waste Services
Responsible for the kerbside refuse collection, kerbside recycling collection, kerbside green
waste collection, the management of Council’s Detox Your Home Facility and the provision
of the annual hard waste and green waste collections.
63,154 64,050 896
Urban
Design
Improving the appearance of the Municipality through the delivery of capital works projects,
design advice, development facilitation and policy creation. Key areas of influence include:
• Town centres and urban villages;
• Parks;
• Linear corridors along waterways; and
• Streetscapes and urban gateways.
Public realm improvements are also facilitated by the unit through advocating for good design
outcomes with private developers, government departments and other areas within Council, and
by lobbying for State Government and other funding.
1,523 1,766 243
Asset
Services
Provides the administration and statutory enforcement of the Building Act within the Brimbank
municipality as well as facilitating the issuing and inspection of building permits for new building
work. The unit also undertakes the statutory enforcement of the Planning and Environment Act,
which ensures Planning Scheme compliance throughout the municipality.
1,282 1,279 (3)
Building
Services
Provides the administration and statutory enforcement of the Building Act within the Brimbank
municipality as well as facilitating the issuing and inspection of building permits for new building
work. The unit also undertakes the statutory enforcement of the Planning and Environment Act,
which ensures Planning Scheme compliance throughout the municipality.
1,506 1,295 (211)
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2014–2015 budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are provided the service.
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Brimbank City Council
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Service / Indicator / Measure
Result
Material Variations
Roads
Appropriateness
Satisfaction
Sealed local road requests
[Number of sealed local road requests / kilometres of sealed local roads ] x100
56.29
No Material Variations
Quality
Condition
Sealed local roads below the intervention level
[Number of kilometres of sealed local roads below the renewal
intervention level set by Council / kilometres of sealed local roads] x100
89.63%
No Material Variations
Cost
Service cost
Cost of sealed local road reconstruction
[Direct cost of sealed local road reconstruction / square metres
of sealed local roads reconstructed]
$206.04
No Material Variations
Service cost
Cost of sealed local road resealing
[Direct cost of sealed local road resealing /
square metres of sealed local roads resealed]
$28.91
No Material Variations
Service outcome
Satisfaction
Satisfaction with sealed local roads
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how council
has performed on the condition of sealed local roads]
60.00
No Material Variations
The following statement provides the results of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation
of material variations.
Service / Indicator / Measure
Result
Material Variations
Waste Collection
Appropriateness
Satisfaction
Kerbside bin collection requests
[Number of kerbside garbage and recycling bin collection requests
/ number of kerbside bin collection households] x1000
239.86
No Material Variations
Quality
Service standard
Kerbside collection bins missed
[Number of kerbside garbage and recycling collection bins missed
/ number of scheduled kerbside garbage and recycling collection bin lifts] x10,000
12.16
No Material Variations
Cost
Service cost
Cost of kerbside garbage bin collection service
[Direct cost of the kerbside garbage bin collection service
/ number of kerbside garbage collection bins]
$104.18
No Material Variations
Service cost
Cost of kerbside recyclables bin collection service
[Direct cost of the kerbside recyclables bin collection service
/ number of kerbside recyclables collection bins]
$29.05
No Material Variations
Service outcome
Waste diversion
Kerbside collection waste diverted from landfill
[Weight of recyclables and green organics collected from kerbside bins / weight of garbage,
recyclables and green organics collected from kerbside bins] x100
37.98%
No Material Variations
03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 3: Urban Design and Infrastructure
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Strategic Objective 4:
Sustainable environments
Strategic Indicator / Measure
Result
Comments
Reducing the city’s ecological footprint
Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions
from Council operations.
5%
Currently at 5% below 2011 levels but trending
in a positive direction.
Protecting and enhancing our natural environment
Resident perception of Council performance
on environmental Sustainability.
61
This score is below target, and is below
Metro Melbourne and state-wide scores.
Fostering sustainable urban development
Resident perception of Council performance
on planning and population growth in the area.
57
This is below target, but above the state-wide
and Melbourne Metro average scores.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Major Initiatives
Progress
Pursue implementation of the Sunshine Town Centre Structure Plan,
St Albans Structure Plan and Keilor Village Vision.
Completed.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2014–2015 budget for the year.
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
City
Planning
Provides Statutory Planning services to Council, the Brimbank community and the development
industry including:
• Administration of the Brimbank Planning Scheme;
• Assessment of planning permit applications for land use, development and subdivision;
• Representation of Council at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal; and
• Responses to property information requests and provision of planning information.
1,814 1,651 (163)
City
Compliance
Provides education and enforcement through relevant legislation, local laws and Council policies.
Maintains a safe and healthy environment in which the community can enjoy a quality of life
that meets their expectations. Prohibits, regulates and controls activities which may be unsafe,
a nuisance or detrimental to the peace and quality of life. Encompassing the following:
Local Laws
• Enforcement of the parking regulations under State Laws (Victorian Road Rules) so there is safe
and fair use of our roads and parking areas;
• Compliance with Council’s Local Laws to ensure that living in the municipality is enjoyable for all;
• Promotion of responsible pet ownership; and
• Providing a safe environment around school crossings.
Environmental Health Services
• Reducing the incidence of food borne disease by ensuring food sold, prepared, manufactured,
stored and transported in the municipality is safe for human consumption;
• Providing an Immunisation Program to reduce preventable diseases;
• Minimising public health risks from environmental hazards;
• Implementing Infectious Diseases Programs to identify and take preventative measures
to minimise the risk of infectious disease outbreaks;
• Enforcing the Tobacco Act requirements including the sale of cigarettes to minors; and
• Providing a Needle Disposal Program and providing advice about handling Sharps.
2,818 2,624 (194)
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2014–2015 budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are provided the service.
03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 4: Sustainable environments
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Service / Indicator / Measure
Result
Material Variations
Statutory Planning
Appropriateness
Timeliness
Time taken to decide planning applications
[The median number of days between receipt of
a planning application and a decision on the application]
92.00
No Material Variations
Quality
Service standard
Planning applications decided within 60 days
[Number of planning application decisions made within
60 days / number of planning application decisions made] x100
65%
No Material Variations
Cost
Service cost
Cost of statutory planning service
[Direct cost of the statutory planning service / number of planning applications received]
$1,868.98
No Material Variations
Service outcome
Decision making
Planning decisions upheld at VCAT
[Number of VCAT decisions that did not set aside council’s decision in relation to a planning
application / number of VCAT decisions in relation to planning applications] x100
71.43%
No Material Variations
Service / Indicator / Measure
Result
Material Variations
Animal Management
Quality
Service standard
Animals reclaimed
[Number of animals reclaimed / number of animals collected] x100
34.39%
No Material Variations
Cost
Service cost
Cost of animal management service
[Direct cost of the animal management service / number of registered animals]
$55.29
No Material Variations
Service outcome
Health and safety
Animal management prosecutions
[Number of successful animal management prosecutions]
6.00
No Material Variations
Food Safety
Quality
Service standard
Food safety assessments
[Number of registered class 1 food premises and class 2 food premises
that receive an annual food safety assessment in accordance with the
Food Act
1984
/ number of registered class 1 food premises and class 2 food premises that
require an annual food safety assessment in accordance with the
Food Act 1984
] x100
100%
No Material Variations
Cost
Service cost
Cost of food safety service
[Direct cost of the food safety service / number of food premises
registered or notified in accordance with the
Food Act 1984
]
$1,131.51
No Material Variations
Service outcome
Health and safety
Critical and major non-compliance notifications
[Number of critical non-compliance outcome notifications and major non-compliance
notifications about a food premises followed up / number of critical non-compliance
outcome notifications and major non-compliance notifications about a food premises] x100
100.00%
No Material Variations
The following statement provides the results of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation
of material variations.
03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 4: Sustainable environments
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03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 5: Industry and Economic Development and Strategic Sites | Strategic Objective 6: Organisational Effectiveness
Strategic Objective 5:
Industry and Economic Development and Strategic Sites
Strategic Objective 6:
Organisational Effectiveness
Strategic Indicator / Measure
Result
Comments
Promoting and advocating for the appropriate recognition,
development and use of Brimbank’s strategic sites
Level of website and social media presence for strategic sites.
2,452
Target achieved.
Increasing local employment, business,
office and economic development
Resident perception of Council performance on business
and community development and tourism.
59
This is above target, but remains lower than
Melbourne Metro and state-wide averages.
Facilitating future industrial, commercial
or residential development at strategic sites
Number of facilitation meetings held with proponents
for major industrial, commercial or residential development
projects on strategic sites.
37
Target exceeded.
Strategic Indicator / Measure
Result
Comments
Developing our people
Separation of low tenure (less than one year)
employees as a percentage of total hires.
7.14%
28 new staff were recruited in an ongoing capacity
in the 2014–2015 FY. Within this time, 2 of these
employees have since left the organisation.
Review and improve Council’s organisational
capabilities within a best practice framework
Resident perception of Council performance
in relation to customer service.
76
This score is on target and above Metro Melbourne
and state-wide average scores.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Major Initiatives
Progress
Promote local tourism attractions through
local and regional networks and initiatives.
Completed.
Major Initiatives
Progress
Extend quarterly reporting on adherence
to Customer Service Standards.
Completed.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2014–2015 budget for the year.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2014–2015 budget for the year.
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable/
(Unfavourable) $000
City
Strategy
Provides economic development services to Council, the Brimbank community and business sector
including:
• Preparation and implementation of long-term land use planning strategies, including the
Municipal Strategic Statement;
• Preparation of planning scheme amendments and review of the Brimbank Planning Scheme;
• Economic development, investment attraction, project facilitation, and marketing;
• Place management and coordinated planning for Brimbank’s town centres and urban villages;
and
• Planning and redevelopment of ‘strategic sites’ being sites with complex environmental
and infrastructure issues.
615 587 (28)
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
People and
Performance
The key responsibilities of the People and Performance department include:
• Supporting and advising Council’s management and employees on all aspects
of Human Resources and Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) management;
• Leading and driving cultural change through the development and implementation
of programs such as:
• Leadership and management development
• Organisational values and behaviours
• An integrated performance management system.
• Reporting of progress against the Council Plan;
• Best Value;
• Business Excellence;
• Process improvement; and
• Knowledge Management.
3,665 3,393 (272)
Information
Management
The key objectives of the Information Management department include:
• To provide a consistently high level of Information Technology and Information
Management services to all service units and community centres, thus enabling
them to effectively manage their business processes;
• To develop and implement Information Technology projects in line with
corporate strategic objective; and
• To assist in providing better Council services to the community.
5,126 6,936 1,810
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2014–2015 budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are provided the service.
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2014–2015 budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are provided the service.
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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04
Governance
and
Management
and other
information
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| Dynamic Centre of the West
04
Governance and Management
Brimbank City Council derives its
power, role, purpose and functions
from the
Local Government Act 1989
.
Governance framework
Brimbank City Council’s Governance Framework
provides for the achievement of best practice
governance, as well as ensuring compliance
with the
Local Government Act 2009
.
Governance at Brimbank is defi ned as the
process of decision-making, and the process
by which decisions are implemented. This
translates into how Council operates as a
decision-making body, and its relationship
with the organisation that provides advice
to Council and implements its decisions.
It also includes the ways that Council
engages with the community in this process.
Council meetings
Council makes its decisions at meetings
that are open to the public.
At
Ordinary Council Meetings
Council
considers a range of matters that aff ect the City.
On 9 December 2014, the schedule for 2015
Ordinary Council Meetings, comprising of twice
monthly meetings, was adopted.
As in previous years, the fi rst meeting was
held on the second Tuesday of the month,
at the Keilor Municipal Offi ces. The second
meeting was held on the fourth Tuesday of
the month, at the Sunshine Municipal Offi ces.
Special Council Meetings
are convened for
a specifi c purpose and only matters advertised
and listed on the agenda for the meeting may
be dealt with (except via resolution).
Governance and Management
Council Agenda
The business to be considered by the Council
is set out in the Council Meeting agenda. The
agenda is available on Council’s website prior
to Council Meetings. Hard copies are available
on the night of the Council Meeting, and at
the Keilor, Sunshine and Sydenham Customer
Service Centres, and at any of Brimbank’s public
libraries, on the day before the meeting.
Council Minutes
Council records the decisions made at each
Council Meeting. Minutes of recent meetings
are available at Council offi ces and on the
website for all meetings held during the current
calendar year (and preceding 12 month period)
as required by the
Local Government (General)
Regulations 2004 Reg
. 11 9(f).
Questions to Council
Community members have the opportunity
to raise questions in writing before an Ordinary
Council Meeting, which are then answered at
the meeting, or taken on notice with a written
response to be sent to the questioner.
Members of the public are also able to petition
Council in accordance with the requirements
of Brimbank City Council’s Meeting Procedure
Local Law.
In 2014–2015, a total of fi ve petitions were
presented to the Council for receiving and
response, and 54 public questions were
put to the Council and answered.
Administrators’ remuneration
and expenses
The Minister for Local Government sets the
remuneration paid to Council’s Administrators.
Expenses incurred by the Administrators in
undertaking their duties for Brimbank are
reported quarterly in a Governance Report
presented at an Ordinary Council Meeting,
in accordance with their Code of Conduct.
The total expenses reported for travel and
communications in these reports for
2014–2015 is $14,053.
Code of Conduct
Section 76C of
the Act
requires councils
to develop and approve a Councillor Code
of Conduct complying with the requirements
of the
Local Government Act 2009
.
Pursuant to section 76C (3) of
the Act
,
the Code of Conduct must contain:
(a) The Councillor Conduct Principles set
out in sections 76B and 76BA of the Act
(b) A process for resolving internal
disputes between Councillors, and
(c) Any other matters relating to the
conduct of Councillors, which the
Council considers appropriate.
Following the appointment of Administrators,
a new Code of Conduct incorporating the
requirements of the
Local Government Act
2009
was developed and adopted by Council
in December 2009. The Code was reviewed
and updated in 2011 and Council adopted
the revised Code of Conduct on 14 December
2011. The document is again being reviewed
in anticipation of the return of Councillors in
October 2016. The Code of Conduct is available
for public inspection at Council offi ces and is
also available on Council’s website.
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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57
Attendance at Council Meetings by Administrators – 1 July 2014–30 June 2015
Name
Ordinary Council Meetings
(22 held)
Special Meetings
(1 held)
John Watson
19
1
Jane Nathan
21
1
John Tanner
22
1
Local laws
Brimbank had two local laws, the
General Local
Law 2008
, which came into effect on 1 January
2008 and the
Meeting Procedure Local Law No. 1
2009
, which came into effect on 28 July 2009.
On 8 July 2014, a third Local Law – the
Governance (Major Policy Consultation) Local
Law No. 3 was made. Local laws apply within
the area of the City of Brimbank and act as
secondary legislation to State and Federal laws.
General Local Law 2008
Brimbank’s
General Local Law 2008
was
adopted on 27 November 2007. The objectives
of the local law are to provide for the:
• Administration of Council’s powers
and functions
• Protection, safe and fair use and
enjoyment of Council property
• Safe and fair use of streets,
roads and footpaths
• Protection, maintenance and enhancement
of the amenity of the municipality to
a standard that meets the general
expectations of the community
• Keeping and control of animals
on land and on Council property, and
• Uniform and fair administration
and enforcement of the local law.
A copy of
General Local Law 2008
can be viewed on Council’s website.
Meeting Procedure Local Law No. 1 2009
Brimbank’s
Meeting Procedure Local Law
was
adopted on 28 July 2009. The primary purposes
of the Meeting Procedure Local Law 2009 are to:
• Provide for the procedures governing
the conduct of Council Meetings and
Committee Meetings
Governance and Management (continued)
• Set the rules of behaviour for those
participating in and attending meetings, and
• Regulate the use of Council’s common seal.
A copy of the Meeting Procedure Local
Law 2009 was available for viewing on
Council’s website.
The
Meeting Procedure Local Law No.1 2009
was reviewed and updated in 2014–2015.
The Meeting Procedure Local Law No.1 2015
(new Meeting Procedure Local Law) was
made on 18 June 2015, following community
consultation conducted in accordance with
the
Local Government Act 2009
. The new
Meeting Procedure Local Law has the same
purposes as the Meeting Procedure Local Law
2009, including provision for greater support
of people with a disability, Council to resolve to
have the position of Deputy Mayor and updates
to assist understanding of its contents.
Governance (Major Policy Consultation)
Local Law No. 3 2014
Brimbank’s Governance (Major Policy
Consultation) Local Law No. 3 was made
on Friday 18 July 2014. It enables Council to
determine whether a policy is, or is not, a ‘major
policy’, and prescribes a public consultation
process to be followed when the Council
proposes to make, amend, modify or revoke a
‘major policy’. The purpose of the local law is to:
• Provide for some policies of Council
to be designated as major policies
• Prescribe the procedure to be followed
before making, amending, modifying
or revoking a major policy
• Promote transparency of decision-making
• Promote best practice in governance
processes, and
• Provide for the peace, order and good
government of the municipal district.
Internal Committees
/External Committees
External Advisory Committees
Three advisory committees with external
representation: Community Wellbeing
Committee; Economic Development and
Transport Committee; and Sustainability
and Environment Committee continued
to meet for the first half of 2014–2015.
Reports of committee meetings were
provided to Ordinary Council Meetings.
Community Wellbeing Committee
Chair:
Brimbank Administrator, John Tanner
(from 21 March 2014).
Community representatives:
Ms Anne Bourke,
Ms Melissa Prescott (until 16 May 2014), Ms
Mary Panayiotou-Bereux, Mr Tim Johnston, Ms
Laura Nicolouleas (until 30 September 2013)
and Ms Joan Ellis.
Sustainability and Environment Committee
Chair:
Chair of the Panel of Brimbank
Administrators, Mr John Watson.
Community representatives:
Mr Anthony
Mangiardi, Ms Larissa Stewart, Mr Guy Edgar,
Mr Damien Wigley and Ms Yeshim Ismail.
Economic Development
and Transport Committee
Chair:
Brimbank Administrator, Mrs Jane Nathan.
Community representatives:
Mr Bill Petreski,
Mr Rodney Con Foo (until 30 November 2013),
Mr David Anderson, Mr Tony Smith, Mr Robert
Chessell and Ms Sue La Greca.
During 2014, the format of the advisory
committees evolved and the committees
merged on several occasions to consider
issues of municipal significance. As the majority
of key committee-specific policies had been
completed, the committees were dissolved
in December 2014.
The fourth advisory committee – the Audit
and Risk Management Committee – continued
to meet on a quarterly basis in 2014–2015.
Administrator Representation
on Committees
Each calendar year, Administrators are
nominated to represent Council on a range
of Council Committees for the following
year. Council Committees comprise Advisory
Committees (with external representation),
Community Consultative/Reference
Committees (with external representation)
and External Committees (where an
Administrator acts as a delegate).
Council advisory committees
(with external representation)
Role of committee
Nominated July 2014
– December 2014
Administrator
Nominated January
2015 – June 2015
Administrator
Audit and Risk Management
Committee (ARMC)
Advisory Committee to Council established in accordance with section 139(2)
of the
Local Government Act 1989
, to provide oversight of internal and
external audit activities.
John Watson
John Watson
Community Wellbeing Committee
Advisory Committee to Council on community wellbeing issues.
Not applicable
Economic Development
and Transport Committee
Advisory Committee to Council on economic development and transport issues.
Jane Nathan
Not applicable
Sustainability and
Environment Committee
Advisory Committee to Council on environmental and sustainability issues.
John Watson
Not applicable
Community Consultative
/ Reference Committee
(with external representation)
Role of committee
Nominated July 2014
– December 2014
Administrator
Nominated January
2015 – June 2015
Administrator
Australia Day Awards
Selection Committee
Selection of Australia Day Award recipients.
John Watson
John Watson
Brimbank Arts
Advisory Committee
To oversee the operational aspects of the
Brimbank Arts Collection Policy Guidelines 2011–2015.
Jane Nathan
Jane Nathan
Brimbank Community
Fund Committee
To provide guidance of the administration
of the Brimbank Community Fund.
John Tanner
John Tanner
Brooklyn Industrial
Precinct Strategy Committee
To provide advice and recommendations to Council on the amenity
of Brooklyn Industrial Precinct.
Jane Nathan
Jane Nathan
Community Liaison Committee –
Former Sunshine Quarry
To examine the management of environmental, amenity and traffic issues,
as well as planning for the end use of the site.
John Tanner
John Tanner
Errington Precinct Master Plan
Implementation (Phase One)
Community Reference Group
To provide for community input into the implementation
of Phase One of the Errington Precinct Master Plan.
John Tanner
John Tanner
Heritage Advisory Committee
To provide a forum for Council to work with the local community to promote
the retention, protection and enhancement of Brimbank’s heritage.
Jane Nathan
Jane Nathan
Keilor Office Building Community
Consultative Committee
To provide for community input into the development
of future use options for the Keilor municipal offices.
John Watson
John Watson
Municipal Emergency
Management Plan Committee
To ensure all agencies are involved in emergency
planning for the municipality.
John Watson
John Watson
St Albans Connect
Strategic Partnership Group
To provide governance for the St Albans Connect Project,
a Council initiative to coordinate the social, community and physical
infrastructure in the St Albans area.
John Tanner
Jane Nathan
(substitute
Council representative)
John Tanner
Jane Nathan
(substitute
Council representative)
Sunshine Town Centre
Partnership Group
To assist in the implementation of the Sunshine Rising program.
To assist Council realise the vision for Sunshine Town Centre.
Jane Nathan
Jane Nathan
Sydenham Town Centre
Partnership Group
To facilitate regular dialogue between Council, QIC and relevant agencies,
relating to the Sydenham Town Centre.
John Watson
John Watson
Brooklyn Community
Reference Group
To foster collaboration between community, industry and government,
to ensure ongoing clean air in the Brooklyn area.
Jane Nathan
Jane Nathan
LeadWest Ltd Board
Representing the councils of Brimbank, Hobsons Bay, Maribyrnong,
Moonee Valley, Melton and Wyndham, to support sustainable growth
and regional development in Melbourne’s West.
John Watson
(Delegate)
John Tanner
(alternate
Delegate)
John Watson
(Delegate)
John Tanner
(alternate
Delegate)
Metropolitan Local Governments’
Waste Management Forum
To assist in the implementation of the Victorian Government’s ‘Waste
and Resource Recovery Policy – Getting Full Value’ and management
and administration of waste disposal contracts.
John Tanner
John Tanner
Council advisory committees
(with external representation)
Role of committee
Nominated July 2014
– December 2014
Administrator
Nominated January
2015 – June 2015
Administrator
Metropolitan Transport Forum
Advocacy group for promotion of effective, efficient
and equitable transport in metropolitan Melbourne.
John Tanner
John Tanner
Municipal Association of Victoria
(MAV) State Council
Victorian Local Government peak body, comprised of representatives whose
role is to advocate on behalf of the industry and support its development, and
represent the interests of their council by presenting its position on issues.
John Watson
(Delegate)
Jane Nathan
(substitute
Delegate)
John Watson
(Delegate)
Jane Nathan
(substitute
Delegate)
Victorian Local Governance
Association (VLGA)
Acts as a peak body for councillors, local governments, community leaders
and groups to support good governance, sustainability and social justice.
John Watson
John Watson
In 2014–2015, the representatives/delegates to Council Committees were:
04
Governance and Management
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2014–2015
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04
Governance and Management |
Governance and Management Checklist in Report of Operations
Audit and Risk
Management Committee
Council’s Audit and Risk Management Committee
is an Advisory Committee appointed under
Section 139 of the
Local Government Act 1989
.
During 2014–2015, the Audit and Risk
Management Committee was responsible for:
• Enhancement of Council’s external
financial reporting
• Effectiveness of both the external
and internal audit functions
• Effective management and protection
of Council assets
• Oversight of strategic risk
management framework
• Compliance with laws and regulations and
consideration of best practice guidelines
• Provision of an effective means of
communication between the external
auditor, internal auditor, management
and Council.
Audit and Risk Management
Committee Charter
The Audit and Risk Management Committee’s
Charter was approved by Council at its
Ordinary Council Meeting on 15 March 2011,
and has been reviewed annually.
As a result of the Charter annual review in
November 2014, the Charter was reformatted
and updated to include the strategic audit
plan and an annual meeting with the external
auditor and internal audit services provider.
In 2014–2015, the responsibilities of the
committee outlined in the Charter have
been carried out.
Composition of Audit and Risk
Management Committee
During the reporting period, the committee
was chaired by independent member,
Mr Michael Beer, and comprised independent
members Mr Richard Jones, Mr Homi Burjorjee,
and Ms Linda MacRae, and Brimbank
Administrator Mr John Watson.
Michael Beer
Independent Chair of Audit Committee
• Accounting and finance
• Audit, corporate governance and risk
management
• Strategic planning.
Richard Jones
Independent Member
• Local Government
• Accounting and finance
• Governance and company secretarial.
Homi Burjorjee
Independent Member
• Chartered accounting
and business administration
• Internal audit
• Local Government
• Risk management and
information technology.
Linda MacRae
Independent Member
• Local Government
• Corporate services and
financial management
• Audit and governance
• Strategic and operational
risk management.
John Watson
Chair of Panel of Brimbank Administrators
• Former Executive Director of Local
Government Victoria
• Local Government
• State Government – specialising
in governance and legislation.
During the reporting period, the committee
received and considered internal audit reports
on the following matters:
• Procurement Review
• Accounts Payable, Procurement – Purchase
Order System, Payroll, Rates – Data Analytics
Review –
• Statutory Planning Review
• Long Term Financial Plan Review
• Records Management Review.
The audit recommendations and management
responses were considered by the Audit
and Risk Management Committee, and were
implemented, or in the process of being
implemented, over 2014–2015. The Audit and
Risk Management Committee monitored the
implementation of audit recommendations at
each meeting of the committee.
The external audit report on the Annual
Financial Report 2013–2014 was received and
considered, as well as the VAGO management
letter and recommendations.
The operation of the Audit and Risk
Management Committee was reported
to Council following each meeting.
Internal audit function
Council’s internal audit function was contracted
to Crowe Horwath in 2014–2015.
Council appointed its internal auditor through
a public tender process in accordance with
section 189 of the
Local Government Act 1989
,
and Council’s Procurement Policy. Following the
tender process, Council re-appointed Crowe
Horwath Melbourne as its internal audit services
provider in March 2014, for a three-year term.
The annual internal audit program for
2014–2015 was successfully conducted.
Governance and Management (continued)
Governance and Management Checklist in Report of Operations
Meetings
The following ordinary meetings of the Audit
and Risk Management Committee were held
during the reporting period:
Meeting No. 100
1 September 2014
Meeting No. 101
7 November 2014
Meeting No. 102
20 February 2015
Meeting No. 103
29 May 2015
The attendance record of Audit and Risk Management Committee members for 2014–2015 was:
Name
No. of meetings
eligible to attend
No. of meetings
attended
Michael Beer (Chair)
4
4
Richard Jones
4
4
Homi Burjorjee
4
4
Linda MacRae
4
3
Chair of Panel of Administrators John Watson
4
4
Governance and Management Items
Assessment
1
Community engagement policy
(policy outlining Council’s commitment to engaging
with the community on matters of public interest)
Policy
Date of operation of current policy: 18 September 2012
2
Community engagement guidelines
(guidelines to assist staff to determine when
and how to engage with the community)
Guidelines
Date of operation of current guidelines: 2012
3
Strategic Resource Plan
(plan under section 126 of the Act outlining the financial and non-financial
resources required for at least the next four financial years)
Adopted in accordance with section 126 of the Act
Date of adoption: 8 July 2014
4
Annual budget
(plan under section 130 of the
Local Government Act 1989
setting out the
services to be provided and initiatives to be undertaken over the next 12
months and the funding and other resources required)
Adopted in accordance with section 130 of the Act
Date of adoption: 8 July 2014
5
Asset management plans
(plans that set out the asset maintenance and renewal needs
for key infrastructure asset classes for at least the next 10 years)
Plans
Date of operation of current plans:
• Road AMP – June 2012
• Open Space AMP – March 2012
• Facilities AMP – January 2012
• Stormwater AMP – March 2011
6
Rating strategy
(strategy setting out the rating structure
of Council to levy rates and charges)
Strategy
Date of operation of current strategy: 8 July 2014
7
Risk policy
(policy outlining Council’s commitment and approach
to minimising the risks to Council’s operations)
Policy
Date of operation of current policy: 16 October 2012
8
Fraud policy
(policy outlining Council’s commitment
and approach to minimising the risk of fraud)
Policy
Date of operation of current policy: 20 August 2014
9
Municipal emergency management plan
(plan under section 20 of the
Emergency Management Act 1986
for emergency prevention, response and recovery)
Prepared and maintained in accordance with
section 20 of the
Emergency Management Act 1986
Date of preparation: 14 October 2014
10
Procurement policy
(policy under section 186A of the
Local Government Act 1989
outlining the matters, practices and procedures that will apply
to all purchases of goods, services and works)
Prepared and approved in accordance with section
186A of the
Local Government Act 1989
Date of approval: 29 October 2013
Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014
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Annual Report 2014–2015
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Governance and Management Items
Assessment
11
Business continuity plan