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Brimbank
Annual Report
2015-2016
Dynamic Centre of the West

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2015-2016
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3
About this Annual Report
2
01 Introduction
4
Snapshot of Council
5
Snapshot of service delivery
7
Highlights of the year
11
Challenges and future outlook
14
The year in review
14
Message from the Administrators
14
Chief Executive Officer’s message
16
Financial summary
17
Description of operations
19
Significant service achievements 2015-2016
20
Strategies, policies and plans adopted
24
Our Council
25
About the Administrators
25
About the Council
25
02 Our people
26
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2016
27
Organisation structure at 30 June 2016
28
Workforce profile
29
Equal Opportunity
31
Other staff matters
31
03 Our performance
34
Planning and Accountability Framework
35
Council Plan Strategic Objectives
36
Strategic Objective 1:
Council and the community working together
38
Strategic Objective 2:
Community wellbeing
41
Strategic Objective 3:
Urban design and infrastructure
46
Strategic Objective 4:
Sustainable environments
50
Strategic Objective 5:
Industry and economic development and strategic sites
54
Strategic Objective 6:
Organisational effectiveness
55
Contents
04 Governance and Management
and other information
56
Governance and Management
57
Statutory information
64
2016 Community Satisfaction Survey
70
Advocacy, consultation and community engagement
72
Volunteering in Brimbank
74
05 Sustainability
75
Sustainability
76
Awards
80
06 Performance Statement
82
Sustainable Capacity Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2016 83
Service Performance Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2016 84
Financial Performance Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2016 86
Other Information
88
Certification of the Performance Statement
89
Independent Auditor’s Report
90
07 Financial Report
92
A Plain English Guide to the Annual Financial Report
94
Financial statements
96
Certification of the Financial Statements
141
Independent Auditor’s Report
142
Acronyms
144
Index
145
Brimbank City Council’s 2015-2016 Annual Report is a
thorough overview of Council’s performance during the
last financial year and includes a report against the
objectives set out in Brimbank’s
Council Plan 2013-2017
.
Within this report, we have outlined Council’s achievements
against the objectives in the
Council Plan
.
The Brimbank City Council Annual Report 2015-2016 aims
to fulfil Council’s statutory responsibilities under the
Local
Government Act 1989
and
Information Privacy Act 2000
.
To obtain a copy of this document, please contact the
Council’s Customer Service Centre on
9249 4000
or view a copy online at
www.brimbank.vic.gov.au
About this Annual Report
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2015-2016
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Back to contents page
Council is committed to
transparent reporting
and accountability to
the community and the
Report of Operations
2015-2016 is the primary
means of advising the
Brimbank community
about Council’s operations
and performance during
the financial year.
The City of Brimbank is one
of the most diverse, energetic
and interesting municipalities
in Victoria.
About Brimbank
Brimbank has the third largest population
in metro Melbourne and the second largest
population in the western region.
Brimbank is the interface between the
inner areas and major urban growth areas
of Melbourne’s west – it is the heart of
Australia’s fastest growing region.
Located in the western and north-western
suburbs of Melbourne, Brimbank is between
12 and 23 kilometres from the Melbourne CBD.
It is bound by Hume City Council in the north,
Maribyrnong and Moonee Valley City Councils
in the east, Hobsons Bay and Wyndham City
Councils in the south and Melton City Council
in the west.
The area was originally occupied by the
Kurung-Jang-Balluk and Marin-Balluk clans of
the native Wurundjeri people. Much of Brimbank
was first settled by Europeans in the 1830s
and 1840s as farming land. Keilor was
established in the late 1840s, while St Albans
was established in the late 1880s.
A rapid growth phase took place after the
Second World War, with the development of
many suburbs around the original settlements
of Keilor, Sunshine and St Albans expanding to
house many overseas migrants.
The City encompasses 25 suburbs including
Albion, Cairnlea, Deer Park, Delahey, Hillside,
Keilor, Kings Park, St Albans, Sunshine,
Sydenham and Taylors Lakes.
Brimbank prides itself on its cultural diversity
and is one of Victoria’s most culturally diverse
municipalities, having embraced more than
156 nationalities from around the globe.
Major attractions and facilities include Brimbank
Park, Calder Park Motorsport Complex, Iramoo
Wildflower Grassland Reserve, Keilor Public Golf
Course, Organ Pipes National Park, Overnewton
Castle, St Albans and Sunshine town centres,
St Albans and Sunshine leisure centres,
Sunshine Golf Club, Sunshine Hospital,
Victoria University (St Albans and Sunshine
campuses) and Watergardens Town Centre.
Brimbank is home to a range of established
organisations, including Aldi, Bunnings,
Caterpillar, FedEx, Ferguson Plarre, Fisher
& Paykel, Hunter Leisure, John Deere, Lombards,
Schweppes, Schiavello and Sims Metal.
More recently, companies such as Digital Realty,
IBM, Metronode, Preshafruit, Sleepyhead
and Vistaprint have also settled in Brimbank.
The dynamic centre
of Melbourne’s west
The ongoing revitalisation of open space,
community facilities and town centres coupled
with a richly diverse community emphasises
Brimbank’s position as one of the best places
to live, work and play in the west of Melbourne.
Over the past few years, Council has focused
strongly on improving the City’s amenity,
liveability, social connectedness and
governance.
By accelerating these outcomes, Council has
made significant advances in planning and
delivering community facilities and public
infrastructure, supporting the arts and
establishing all services on the ground.
Council is now consolidating the strong growth
and investment and continuing to strengthen
key stakeholder partnerships.
Located between 12 and 23 kilometres from
Melbourne’s CBD, Brimbank offers a central
location linking established centres and new
growth areas. It has land for development;
established town centres; easy access to rail,
road, port and aviation infrastructure; and
links to the Princes Freeway, Calder Freeway,
Western Highway and M80 Ring Road,
and the regional centres of Geelong, Ballarat
and Bendigo.
Brimbank has a significant strategic role to play
in the provision of employment and business
development for Victoria. Council’s business
development initiatives work to promote
opportunities, attract and facilitate new
businesses and enable existing businesses
to grow and prosper.
Snapshot of Council
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01
Introduction
01 Introduction |
Snapshot of Council

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Snapshot of Council (continued)
Reconciliation and
Indigenous information
Brimbank has a rich Indigenous history, going
back to when the Wurundjeri people first inhabited
the region, thriving in the Maribyrnong Valley.
Council acknowledges the Kulin nation of
people as the traditional owners of the land,
the continuing spiritual connection to the
land and renews its commitment to respect
Indigenous beliefs, values and customs.
About 440 Registered Aboriginal Places
exist in the Brimbank Local Government Area.
The oldest artifacts found in the City are
over 30,000 years old.
On 26 February 2008, Council adopted the
full motion passed by the Federal Government
on 13 February 2008 in saying sorry to the
Stolen Generations on behalf of the Australian
Parliament and people, and extended an
apology to those Stolen Generations on
behalf of the people of Brimbank.
Since July 2011, Council has flown both the
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags
alongside the Australian national flag every
day outside its Sunshine Municipal Office.
Each year Brimbank City Council hosts a broad
range of activities during Reconciliation and
NAIDOC Week, such as Aboriginal cultural
heritage tours, Sorry Day events, Indigenous
art exhibitions, library story-telling sessions
and NAIDOC flag raisings.
On 17 April 2012, Council endorsed a
Reconciliation Statement of Commitment
and officially signed the Statement on 29 May
2012, committing it to learning from the past
and seeking new ways to build relationships
with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
community, and to developing a Reconciliation
Action Plan. It was committed that the
Reconciliation Action Plan would be developed
in consultation with internal and external
stakeholders including Council staff, Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander residents and local
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander service
providers and community groups.
In May 2013, Council adopted a Reconciliation
Action Plan that demonstrates its commitment
to reconciliation for all Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people.
Brimbank at a glance
Vision, Mission, Values and
Statement of Strategic Intent
Brimbank’s
Council Plan 2013-2017
sets out
Council’s vision, statement of strategic intent,
mission and values as follows:
Vision
Brimbank will be the dynamic centre of
Melbourne’s west. We will be a proud,
diverse and connected community.
Statement of Strategic Intent
Develop Brimbank through enhancing and
celebrating the many diverse identities,
communities and cultures within Brimbank;
creating high quality spaces and places; and
providing learning and employment opportunities.
Mission
Brimbank City Council will strive to achieve
the community’s vision by:
• Meeting the needs of our community and
those of future generations in a collaborative
and financially responsible manner
• Enhancing community wellbeing within
a strong foundation of social justice
• Creating an urban environment that is safe,
attractive, vibrant and livable
• Demonstrating commitment to environmental
protection, sustainable development and
reducing our ecological footprint
• Promoting Brimbank as the first choice for
new industry, business and development
• Delivering best practice services that
meet the needs of the diverse and
growing Brimbank community.
Values
For Brimbank City Council employees and the
Council, to be the best at what they do and
achieve the community vision and Council
strategic intent and mission, their actions
and decisions are guided by a set of five
fundamental and unifying values:
12km
BALLARAT
GEELONG
BENDIGO
BRIMBANK
MELTON
GROWTH AREA
WYNDHAM
GROWTH AREA
Melbourne Airport
Port of Melbourne
INNER
MELBOURNE
SUNSHINE
Area
Population count
(estimated resident population, June 2015)
Males
50.0%
Females
50.0%
Residents aged under 18 years 23.2%
Residents aged between
18 and 59 years
60.0%
Residents aged 60 years and over 16.8%
Indigenous population
702
Residents who speak a
non-English language at home
56.2%
Median house price for 2015
123 square kilometres
199,432
$442,000
we show
RESPECT
we act with
INTEGRITY
we work
TOGETHER
we
COMMUNICATE
openly
we strive for
EXCELLENCE
Data provided by the Australian Bureau of Statistics
2011 Census Data, with the exception of the median
house price for 2015, which was sourced from the
Department of Environment, Land, Water & Planning
using Landata – Land Victoria.
01 Introduction |
Snapshot of Council
|
Snapshot of service delivery
Snapshot of service delivery
Children, youth and
family services
Council provides a range of services for families
and young children and opportunities for
young people to develop skills and contribute
to community life.
What we delivered
• Coordinated home-based child care with
205 equivalent full-time child care places
and 1105 monitoring visits to 52 active
Family Day Care Educators, contributing
373,100 hours of care
• Supported provision of child care
at nine centres
• Maintained 30 preschool premises
• Processed 2400 four-year-old
preschool applications
• Supported playgroups with Smalltalk
intervention, two shopping centre
playgroups, 79 community playgroups
combining facilitated and volunteers
• Conducted 2988 Maternal and
Child Health first home visits
• Saw 8710 children at a Brimbank
Maternal and Child Health clinic
• Provided Youth Support and Counselling
Services to 102 young people
• Supported a range of youth programs
attended by 1880 young people
• Coordinated 17 events attended
by 440 young people
What we delivered
• Management of 79 sports clubs
using 130 sports facilities
• Supported sports clubs to provide
12,100 children and adults with
sports participation opportunities
• Provided 420 sporting opportunities
to disadvantaged children through
In2Sport Brimbank
• Delivered 16 Sports Club Development
network meetings to educate and
inform Brimbank sports clubs
• 212 sports clubs volunteers attended
Council-delivered volunteer training sessions
• Successfully delivered the Brimbank Cup
with 30 teams competing including 12
community teams, six female teams and
an Asylum Seeker Team in partnership
with Keilor Wolves SC, Football Federation
Victoria and Victoria Police
• 75 attendees at the 2016 Brimbank Sports
Awards, recognising the achievements
of 10 sporting clubs and five volunteers,
inducted into the Hall of Fame recognising
25 years or more of volunteer service
• 4546 Brimbank residents involved
in the Active Premiers Challenge
• 18 sports-related capital works projects
completed to improve sports facilities
for community benefit
• Five young leaders involved in the
Whitten Youth Leadership project
to enhance leadership skills
• 73 Brimbank residents involved in
the Sons of the West Men’s Health
Program run at two locations
• $100,000 of external funding from
Sport and Recreation Victoria secured
to complete Lloyd Reserve floodlighting
• $15,000 of external funding secured
from Cricket Victoria for the Asylum
Seeker Cricket Program
• Facilitated 230,814 visits to the Keilor
Basketball and Netball Stadium which
achieved a 35 per cent (8042) increase
in netball-related attendances
• Construction of three additional courts
at Keilor Basketball and Netball Stadium,
resulting in a 24 per cent increase in stadium
attendances within the first six months
• 33 community facilities managed available
for regular, casual and function hire
• 160 community groups managed across
26 different nationalities with 7436
regular hire bookings at community
facilities involving 411,663 attendances
• 19,575 attendances at functions
held in community facilities available
for function hire
• Facilitated 568,947 visits to aquatic
facilities including 344,688 member visits
• Facilitated 62,816 group fitness visits
across 4399 classes with an average
of 14 people per class
• 69,745 learn to swim visits with average
weekly participant numbers of 2215
• 10 membership options to ensure
affordable services at leisure centres
• 33,704 rounds of golf played
at Keilor Public Golf Course
Leisure and community facilities
Council provides a range of sport and recreation opportunities for the community to engage
in healthy physical activity, sport and social activities at its leisure centres. Council also
delivers community infrastructure such as community hubs and sport and recreation facilities
to strengthen local communities.

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Waste and recycling
Council has a commitment to sustainable waste
management and provides a comprehensive
waste service to the community.
What we delivered
• Weekly domestic waste and fortnightly
recycling collection for 68,252 households
and fortnightly green waste collection
for 36,340 households
• Lifted 5,290,948 bins
• Collected 42,702 tonnes of waste
• Recycled 16,757 tonnes of waste
• Collected 10,010 tonnes of green waste
• Collected and recycled 3342 tonnes
of hard waste, 34 tonnes of steel, 9106
mattresses and 3468 tyres in the annual
kerbside hard waste collection service
• Collected 41,342 kilos of paint,
24,100 litres of motor oil and 1274
kilograms of household batteries
• Accepted 483 kilograms of fluorescent
tubes, 542 car batteries, 26,557 kilograms
of e-waste and 2515 gas cylinders at the
permanent Detox Your Home centre at
Stadium Drive, Keilor Park
Environmental health
Council has a responsibility to provide
services and information to the community
in order to protect the public from disease,
provide safety and ensure wellbeing.
What we delivered
• Conducted 1716 food premise inspections
• Administered 3458 vaccinations to infants
• Administered 8469 vaccinations
to school-aged children
What we delivered
• Provided 17,132 program and event
hours through community centres
for 24,372 participants
• Neighbourhood houses that were attended by
304,846 people who dropped in or participated
in a regular and casual program or class
• Held the Brimbank Sustainable Living Expo
attended by more than 3,000 people
• Coordinated the Brimbank Men’s Health
Day and Pop Up Shed events for more
than 550 people
• Community leadership programs for 45 people
• 20 governance training sessions for
412 participants
• Held four Brimbank Leadership
Alumni Networking events
• The Brimbank Leadership Alumni Mentoring
Program for 12 Alumni members
• Provided funding to 64 community
groups valued at $330,000
• Conducted seven Places of Worship tours
visiting nine places of worship that were
attended by close to 200 people
• Held three Interfaith events – Spiritual Care
and Family Violence Forum, World Interfaith
Harmony Week and the Faith, Hope and
Reconciliation Forum – for more than 120
attendees across the Brimbank Maribyrnong
Interfaith Network
• Successfully delivered four Living In
Your Neighbourhood sessions to over
180 English students
• Coordinated five community events –
International Day of Persons with a Disability
Expo, Cultural Diversity Week, Reconciliation
Week, Refugee Week and the IDAHO Flag
raising with an attendance of over 500 people
• Successfully completed the Victorian
Government funded Harmony in Our
Neighbourhood Project
• Exhibited work from 18 artists, two arts
groups, two community groups and one
Brimbank staff show at the Hunt Club
Community Arts Centre and the Sunshine
Art Spaces Gallery which attracted around
1000 attendees
• Supported 15 artists or arts organisations by
providing five dedicated art spaces (studios
or shopfronts) for career development
• Continued work on a major public artwork in
Sunshine and supported the development of
another in Braybrook and in the Pollard Gardens
• Supported four artworks in the Public Realm
Project with Youth Services
• Held four INfuse artists’ network professional
development events, attended by around
72 artists
• Awarded three Activation Partnership
funds to artists through the Art Spaces
program and one in a library
• Facilitated eight community art participation
projects (one ongoing) involving around
700 community members attending 105
workshops, rehearsals and performances
• Facilitated participation of 10 primary
schools in creative arts projects, involving
30 workshops with five artists
• Supported seven community performances
with 120 community performers and
artists and attended by 6700 audience
• Supported two exhibitions of community
artwork (Lantunda at Sunshine Arts Spaces,
APAN puppets at Deer Park Library)
• Advised and guided more than 30 community
groups and artists to produce community
projects and events
• 53 classes with 417 students
in total for the last financial year
01
Introduction |
Snapshot of service delivery
Planning and building
Council is responsible for planning permit
approvals, providing building permit services,
and conducting inspections of building
works and fire safety audits.
What we delivered
• 1165 planning applications received
• 582 planning-related property
information requests received
• 283 subdivision applications received
• $351.86 million total value of new building
projects requiring building permits
• 199 report and consent requests
received and processed for buildings
• 347 mandatory building inspections
• 2019 building-related property
information requests
• 317 requests for copies of plans received
• 388 Building Notices and Orders served
• 93 illegal rooming house inspections
• 126 swimming pool barrier inspections
• 60 essential services
maintenance inspections
• 21 emergency call-outs
• 673 investigations resulting
from building-related complaints
• 294 illegal building works identified
• 465 investigations resulting from
planning compliance complaints
• 1130 inspections resulting from
planning compliance complaints
• 27 Magistrates’ Court prosecutions
for planning compliance
• Six Magistrates’ Court prosecutions
for building compliance
• 36 Planning Infringement Notices issued
Library services
Brimbank’s five libraries offer collections of books,
magazines, DVDs, toys and other items as well as
programs and information services for the whole
community at no charge, and cater for all ages.
A Home Library Service operates for people
who are unable to visit the library due to illness,
frailty and disability. Library programs support
lifelong learning and include weekly story times
and computer classes. All libraries offer study
facilities, WiFi, Internet and computer access
and printing. Of the 233,327 items available to
borrow, 26 per cent are on loan at any given time.
The library’s online services include e-reference,
downloadable e-books and audio books,
access to hundreds of online magazines,
and newspapers in over 60 languages.
What we delivered
• 31,573 new physical items added
to the collection in English and 19
community languages
• 14,388 electronic resources added
to the collection
• 1,947,653 total library visits; of these visits,
1,078,676 were made to the five libraries
and 868,977 to the online library
• 1,354,499 collection loans; of these, 915,328
physical items were borrowed and 439,171
electronic resources were utilised
• 186,687 catalogue searches completed
• 10,643 new library members registered
bringing the total library membership
to 81,194
• 28,068 active library members
• 270,426 Internet bookings made
• 96,522 instances of IT help provided
to the community
• 10,213 video game bookings made
• 121,297 reference questions answered
• 3259 library programs provided
to 66,951 people
• 750 people attended the Brimbank
Writers & Readers Festival
• 1234 home library service visits to
deliver books and other resources
City compliance
Council is responsible for providing education
and enforcement through relevant legislation,
local laws and Council policies, and maintains
a safe and healthy environment in which the
community can enjoy a quality of life that
meets their expectations.
What we delivered
• 13,610 compliance service inquiries attended
to, comprising 2005 for parking, 1053 for
local law, 481 for litter, 1234 for abandoned/
derelict vehicles, 2435 for condition of land,
2038 inquiries about cats, 2385 inquiries
about dogs and 1053 other inquiries
• 2562 animals collected by Council
(912 dogs, 1654 cats, 117 other animals)
• 12,324 dogs and 3223 cats registered
• Seven dog attack prosecutions and 429
infringements for animal-related matters
• 15,462 parking infringements and 614
local law infringements issued
• 1469 vacant properties inspected and 965
Local Laws Notices to Comply issued; of
these, 243 land owners were issued with
infringements and 191 properties had to
be cut by Council’s contractor
• 76 event permits issued
• 112 school crossings supervised
every school day
Snapshot of service delivery (continued)
Culture and community strengthening
Council offers a range of services to the community including arts and culture, events,
and community centres.

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Strategic objective:
Council and the community
working together
Brimbank City Council is committed to working
in close collaboration with the community,
facilitating a wide cross-section of community
participation, including ‘hard to reach’ groups,
through a variety of forums and partnerships
to better engage, develop, represent and
communicate with our diverse community.
Brimbank City Council will fulfil its statutory
and legal obligations to the community
and manage the municipality in a financially
sustainable manner to meet the current
needs of our community and those of
future generations.
Achievements:
• Council provided Community Grants funding
to 64 community groups valued at $330,000.
• Conducted seven Places of Worship tours
visiting nine places of worship, which were
attended by close to 200 people. Held three
Interfaith Events – Spiritual Care and Family
Violence Forum, World Interfaith Harmony
Week and the Faith, Hope and Reconciliation
Forum – for more than 120 attendees across
the Brimbank Maribyrnong Interfaith Network.
• Successfully delivered four Living in Your
Neighbourhood sessions to over 180 English
language students and established the
Harmony in our Neighbourhood Program
which engaged 15 people from new and
emerging communities in leadership
development and project delivery.
• Conducted Community Leadership programs
for 45 people and ran 20 governance training
sessions for 412 participants.
• Facilitated eight community art participation
projects (one ongoing) involving around
700 community members attending
105 activities, involved 10 primary schools
in creative arts projects involving 30
workshops with five artists, and supported
seven community performances with
120 community performers and artists,
which were attended by 6700 people.
Strategic objective:
Community wellbeing
Brimbank City Council is committed to creating
an enhanced quality of healthy and active
community life where our rich cultures are
celebrated, embraced and connected to the
broader community.
Within a strong foundation of social justice,
Council is committed to the provision
of affordable services and community
infrastructure that builds healthy people and
communities through education, recreation,
arts and culture, and sport.
Achievements:
• Continued to work with members of the
Social Justice Coalition on joint advocacy
initiatives to improve the health and
wellbeing needs of Brimbank residents.
Projects included the Victorian Local
Government Multicultural Issues Network
(VLGMIN) and National Disability Insurance
Scheme (NDIS) forums, and human rights
training delivered by the Victorian Equal
Opportunity and Human Rights Commission.
• Provided 420 disadvantaged children with
the opportunity to join a sports club and
enjoy the social, physical and psychological
benefits of playing sport through the
In2Sport Brimbank Program.
• Council collaborated with a range of
organisations including other Victorian
councils and organisations to implement and
evaluate health initiatives on topics such as
problem gambling, gender equity, drug and
alcohol issues, and population health.
• Implementation of the Brimbank Children’s Plan
2015-2019 has included roll-out of the revised
Supported Playgroup Program; introduction
of online kindergarten registration forms; and
mapping to support kindergarten participation
and transition to school. Service partnerships
were also developed with Child First and
Drummond Street Services to improve support
services to vulnerable families and children; and
new sleep settling services were developed
through Maternal and Child Health (MCH)
services.
• Implementation of the Brimbank Youth
Strategy 2015-2019 has included the Bright
Futures Regional Roadshow in partnership
Highlights of the year
Roads, footpaths, drains
and building maintenance
Council is responsible for managing the City’s
local roads, footpaths and other assets.
What we delivered
• 1228 kilometres of underground drain
pipes managed and maintained along
with 60 kilometres of table drains
• 44,491 storm water pits, 423 litter traps
and 38 gross pollutant traps maintained
and cleaned
• 3889 drain pits inspected and cleaned
• 3205 litter traps inspected and cleaned
• 909 kilometres of local roads (sealed and
unsealed) inspected and maintained,
including 14 kilometres of unsealed roads
and 1565 kilometres of footpaths
• 80,000 street/road signs proactively
inspected and maintained and 5905
signs physically maintained
• 31,000 (approx.) kilometres of residential
and commercial kerb and channel swept
• 1924 tonnes collected through street
sweeping program
• 128,431 street litter bins emptied
• 2154 tonnes of litter collected through
the street litter bin and manual litter
collection service
• 97,243 square metres of local roads resealed
• 266 buildings maintained on 165 sites
• 211 playgrounds maintained, of which
153 are in open space and 56 in preschools,
child care and community centres
Ageing and inclusion
Council’s Ageing and Inclusion services for the
community include Home and Community Care
(HACC) and Community Aged Care Packages
(CACP), and a range of Community Programs
including Community Transport, HACC Planned
Activity Groups (PAG), volunteers and seniors.
These services support, maintain and enhance
the physical, social and emotional wellbeing
of older people and people with a disability
living in Brimbank.
What we delivered
• 59,987 meals on wheels
• 42,482 hours of domestic assistance
• 16,370 hours of personal care
• 3931 people received a Home
and Community Care service
• 13,118 hours of respite care
• 3678 hours of property maintenance
• 48,886 hours of planned activity
support services
• 7796 hours of assessment
and care management
• 28,525 passenger trips on Brimbank’s
community transport buses
Parks, open spaces
and environment
Council is responsible for upgrading and
maintaining local parks, creek corridors, sports
grounds, municipal reserves and street trees.
What we delivered
• Upgraded four neighbourhood playgrounds
• Planted 55,000 new trees as part of
One Million Trees planting initiative
• Planted 820 semi-mature trees along
Furlong Road and Ballarat Road
• Planted 130 semi-mature trees in parks
and activity centres
• Completed suburban park upgrade at
Harefield Crescent, Kealba, which was
officially opened on 27 August 2016
• Completed a new off-road cycling route
along Old Calder Highway from the
Historical footbridge over the Maribyrnong
River to Kennedy Street, Keilor Village
• Completed Stage 1 upgrade of
Hampshire Road, Sunshine, from
Dickson Street to Devonshire Road
as part of the implementation of
the Hampshire Road Master Plan
• 43 conservation sites managed
to improve habitat for indigenous
flora and fauna, covering 370 hectares
• Nine ecological burns completed to reduce
biomass and increase vegetation quality,
covering 14 hectares
• 14,004 indigenous grasses, herbs, shrubs
and trees planted to restore habitat
• Installed new irrigation system at
HV McKay Gardens, Sunshine
• Maintained approximately 1180 hectares
of public open space, streetscapes,
grassed areas and soft landscaped areas
• Inspected and maintained approximately
200,000 trees in parks and streets including
powerline clearing works in line with Council’s
Electric Line Clearance Management Plan
• Carried out emergency tree works and
clean-up following a significant storm
event in July 2016
• Maintained 29 sports reserves
comprising 63 playing fields
• Maintained 143 irrigation systems
• Maintained Keilor Public Golf Course
Snapshot of service delivery (continued)
with VicHealth to promote community and
resilience, social connection and mental
wellbeing for young people (12-25 years
old). Another highlight was the continued
development of the Western Youth
Employment and Learning Network, a
partnership with local government and
Local Learning and Employment Networks
(LLEN) to improve youth access to training
and employment.
• Implementation of the Age Friendly City Plan
2013-2017 has included commencement
of review of Age Friendly City Plan 2013-
2017 and the development of a new plan
to be completed in 2017; implementation
of service and program changes resulting
from the introduction of the Commonwealth
Home Support Programme (CHSP); and
Council endorsement of the Age Friendly
Victoria Declaration between the Victorian
Government and municipality.
• The Annual Brimbank Sports Awards
recognised the contribution clubs and
volunteers make to the Brimbank community.
• The netball program delivered at the Keilor
Basketball and Netball Stadium introduced
many girls to the game and stadium.
• Implementation of the Brimbank Community
Learning Strategy 2014-2017 saw the
successful completion of the annual Action
Plan in collaboration with community
partners. Highlights include project
investigation of the ‘middle years’ program
options for disengaged young people;
careers and job fairs programs; the `Choosing
a VET provider’ information sheet which was
translated into eight community languages;
development of a joint submission to the
Victorian Government’s Education State
consultation; and hosting of two Schools/
Community Agencies Exchanges, attended
by more than 120 people.
• Work on the proposed Brimbank Education
Development Centre took place with a
proposal presented to the Adult, Community
and Further Education (ACFE) Community
Solutions Program steering committee. This
funding will assist in boosting pre-accredited
training and pathways articulation in Sunshine
and contribute towards an exciting new
education and learning precinct in Sunshine.
01
Introduction |
Snapshot of service delivery
|
Highlights of the year

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2015-2016
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Highlights of the year (continued)
• Nine ecological burns were completed to
reduce biomass and increase vegetation
quality, covering 14 hectares. Eleven offset
sites were managed to compensate for past
vegetation removal and 43 conservation
sites were managed to improve habitat
for indigenous flora and fauna, covering
370 hectares.
• Water Sensitive Urban Design projects
have been completed as part of four road
rehabilitation projects. The Keilor Basketball
and Netball Stadium car park Water Sensitive
Urban Design treatment was completed.
• Adopted the St Albans Activity Centre
Precinct Structure Plan 2015.
• Adopted Brimbank Planning Scheme
Amendments C162 and C177 which
implement the Keilor Village Vision 2012
(revised 2015) and land use and development
recommendations made in the Brooklyn
Evolution 2012.
• Delivered lighting improvements in the
Sunshine and St Albans town centres
utilising approved grants from the
Department of Justice.
• Continued to implement the Sunshine Rising
Business Plan 2012-2017 with 94 per cent
of actions in progress or complete, and the
Brooklyn Evolution 2012.
• Adopted the Brimbank Car Parking
Management Framework 2016.
Strategic objective: Industry
and economic development
and strategic sites
Brimbank City Council is committed to providing
local employment and business development
opportunities while also ensuring that such
activities do not have a detrimental impact
on local communities.
The municipality contains a range of strategic
sites (outside of town centres or urban villages)
that, due to their location, size, environment or
current or past use, can greatly assist Council
achieve its economic, social or environmental
objectives.
Achievements:
• Completed delivery of the 2016 ‘Grow your
Business’ Group program which targets
manufacturing and a regular business
training program targeting small businesses
across retailing and professional services
with more than 300 businesses attending
development and networking events.
• In collaboration with Western Melbourne
Tourism and Destination Melbourne, Council
has promoted Brimbank attractions including
Overnewton Castle, St Albans Lunar Festival
and Alice’s Playspace, and distributed over
100 ‘Experience Brimbank’ brochures to key
stakeholders.
• Held the Sunshine Town Centre Investment
Forum and updated the Investment
Prospectus, which was distributed at the
forum. Council’s promotion of the business
engagement program for the Sunshine
National Employment Cluster has also
resulted in metro media across metropolitan
papers and investment publications.
Strategic objective:
Sustainable environments
Brimbank City Council is committed to
promoting the long-term sustainable
development of the municipality.
Council will do this by facilitating a dynamic
and accessible environment that is supported
by a healthy and informed community that
enjoys rich environmental characteristics
within the municipality. Council is committed
to environmental protection, planning for
sustainable developments, improving the
sustainability of our building stock,
and reducing our ecological footprint.
Achievements:
• Council finalised surveys for approximately
1000 hectares of open space within
Brimbank and mapped 370 hectares of
native vegetation. The mapping recorded
10 vegetation classes, three of which have
not previously been documented within
the municipality. The mapping has created
GIS layers that alert Council to areas of
native vegetation when activities causing
disturbance are proposed so we can protect
as much habitat as possible.
• The Sunvale Community Park Master Plan
was adopted by Council following extensive
community consultation. The Master Plan
includes dedicated play spaces for varying
age groups, including water play for younger
children; a multi-purpose skateable space
for all ages; a large, green ‘kick a ball’ space
for active play, passive recreation and
outdoor cinema use; and an edible garden
for use by all the community.
• Stage 1 Hampshire Road, Sunshine, upgrade
works were completed in November 2015.
The works were in line with the Hampshire
Road Master Plan 2014, which outlines
a vision for the evolution of Sunshine’s
premier ‘main street’ in four stages. Stage 1
works included footpath and street lighting
upgrades, a raised pedestrian crossing
and construction of a sculptural seating wall.
Works cost $1,180,000 including a $200,000
grant from the Victorian Government’s
Community Infrastructure Fund.
• Keilor Village Concept Plan was adopted
by Council following extensive community
consultation. Some new shared trails were
completed that linked the village shops
to the Maribyrnong River.
• A web-based online tool, developed in
collaboration by Council, RMIT and the
CSIRO for estimating the condition and
risk of asset failure of storm water pipes,
is now complete and in full operation.
• Completed suburban park upgrade at
Harefield Crescent, Kealba, and upgraded
four neighbourhood playgrounds.
• The Sports Facility Development Plan
update has been adopted by Council.
The Updated Plan identifies the key
sporting infrastructure challenges posed
by recreation participation trends and
population change in Brimbank, and
presents solutions for these challenges.
It aims to support participation in physical
activity by improving the quality of access
to, and the provision and promotion of,
sport and recreation facilities.
Strategic objective: Urban
design and infrastructure
Brimbank City Council is committed to fostering
strong pride for residents and visitors by
creating an urban environment that is
attractive, clean and green, and which improves
living and housing, business and recreational
opportunities, demonstrates environmental
leadership and fosters a sustainable economy.
Achievements:
• The Creating Better Parks Plan update
has been adopted by Council. Creating Better
Parks won a commendation for a Planning
Excellence Award at the national level and
an award for excellence at state level in the
Category
From Plan to Place
from Planning
Institute of Australia, for the transformation
of the public realm. Creating Better Parks
identifies a further 156 parks to be upgraded
in future capital works programs subject
to budget considerations.
• The Urban Forest Strategy was adopted
by Council – setting a framework to increase
tree canopy cover and the provision of shade
across the municipality from 6.2 per cent
currently to 30 per cent by 2046.
• Council’s tree planting program saw 1996
semi-mature trees planted in streets,
1000 semi-mature trees planted in parks
and main roads with 55,000 tube stock
planted in parks as part of the One Million
Trees planting initiative.
• Council is part of a partnership project
to rehabilitate a 1.2-kilometre section
of Upper Stony Creek in Sunshine North.
This is a Greening The West project that
brings together government and industry
with partners Brimbank City Council, City
West Water, Melbourne Water, Victorian
Department of Environment, Land, Water
and Planning, Places Victoria, the Federal
Government and Greenfleet Australia.
The $12.9 million project is funded from
federal and state agencies and the
private sector. This project received
a 2016 Stormwater Victoria award for
Excellence in Strategic or Master Planning.
Strategic objective:
Organisational effectiveness
Brimbank City Council is committed to the
ongoing delivery of a broad range of services
that meet the needs and aspirations of the
diverse and growing Brimbank community.
Guided by the Australian Business Excellence
Framework, the ongoing development of our
staff is a critical element to our continuous
improvement of service delivery. We will
continue to benchmark services to ensure
best practice, lead by example, and implement
best practice services to the community.
Achievements:
• The Brimbank Council and Community
Centre was near to completion at the end
of the 2015-2016 year. The centre includes
new telephony and face-to-face customer
service facilities and services, a new library
space and a range of high quality community
meeting rooms.
• The Business Transformation Program
continued to develop and introduce
better service delivery models to
Brimbank residents. Works during the year
included developing a mobile responsive
website, online payments, single view of
customer and digitisation. The Business
Transformation Program seeks to make sure
that the organisation is equipped to change
easily with the ever-shifting needs of its
customers and emerging technologies.
• At the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 21 June
2016, Council adopted key documents for the
2016-2017 financial year: 2016-2017 Annual
Budget, 2016-2026 Long Term Financial Plan
and 2016-2017 Rating Strategy. This is the
first budget since the introduction by the
Victorian Government of the rate capping
legislation. For the 2016-2017 financial year
rates are capped at 2.5 per cent.
01
Introduction |
Highlights of the year

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2015-2016
|
15
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01
Introduction |
Challenges and future outlook
|
The year in review
Challenges and
future outlook
The year in review
Challenges
• Rate capping will have a significant impact on
Council’s budget into the future and the rate
level remains uncertain
• Council has a higher than average dependence
on rates revenue – 73 per cent of Council income
comes from rates – while Council is constantly
seeking grants, its ability to raise revenue from
user fees and charges is limited
• Large development contributions for community
infrastructure is reducing as the final stages
of green field development are completed
• Ensuring good urban design and liveability
outcomes from the new developments across
the municipality
• Pursuing diminishing government grants
and other sources of funding for major
projects and initiatives
• Keeping ahead of rapid technological change
• An aging workforce
• Planning for equitable and quality community
services through the implementation of the
NDIS HACC reform process.
The future
• Plan for a smooth transition to a democratically
elected Council in October 2016
• Complete the St Albans community centre and
the redevelopment of the Keilor Municipal Offices
• Plan for the redevelopment of the
St Albans Leisure Centre
• Continue to green the City and improve the
amenity of the area with better parks, open
spaces, public art and urban design treatments
within a constrained environment
• Develop the new Council Plan 2017-2021
and review the Community Plan 2009-2030
• Investigate opportunities for cost saving and
service improvements through shared services
and new and emerging technology improvements
• Deliver the $57.8 million capital program to
maintain and upgrade critical civic assets,
upgrade town centres, improve community
facilities, early learning facilities, parks,
playgrounds and open spaces and sports
facilities including $2.2 million earmarked
for the repurposing of the former Keilor
Municipal Office into a fantastic community hub
• Manage urban development and renewal in
line with community expectations, sustainable
redevelopment of greyfield sites and secure
appropriate development contributions for
essential infrastructure.
This Annual Report outlines Brimbank City Council’s performance
in accomplishing the actions outlined in the Brimbank
Council Plan
2013-2017
(Year 3 – updated 2015).
Message from the Administrators
As Administrators, we act as the Council. We were appointed by the State Government.
Council functions and powers are set out in the
Local Government Act 1989
.
The role of Council includes:
• Setting the strategic direction for Council and monitoring
and improving ongoing performance
• Managing Council’s assets and resources responsibly
• Considering the current and future needs of the local community
when making decisions
• Providing accessible, accountable and transparent government
• Advocating the needs of the Brimbank community to promote investment
by other spheres of government and the private sector
• Promoting civic participation and delivering programs, which enhance
community health and wellbeing.
Highlights
In 2015-2016 Council continued its ongoing investment in community facilities.
Significant projects included:
• The $6.5 million extension of the Keilor Basketball and Netball Stadium was completed
• Works continued on the $52 million Brimbank Community and Civic Centre
including the new Sunshine Library
• Construction began on a $11.5 million multi-deck car park in the
Sunshine Town Centre with 361 car spaces including 113 for public use
• Construction started on the $8.9 million St Albans Community Centre
and Bowery Theatre (formerly Errington Community Centre).
Each of these projects contributes positively to community wellbeing by providing
access to first class leisure and cultural opportunities.
Importantly the Brimbank Community and Civic Centre will also open up a revenue
stream for Council through the tenant spaces that will be available in the new building.
Council also awarded a $1.7 million contract for construction works to upgrade the Keilor
Municipal Office on the Old Calder Highway to a mixed-use facility for the community.
This is a win for the residents of Keilor and surrounds. Once works are completed the
refurbished building will offer a relocated and expended Keilor Library, a customer
service centre, and more and improved community space.
In addition to community facilities, Council’s
capital works for 2015-2016 included a
significant investment in the local road and
footpath network. The $23.6 million program
included the much anticipated sealing of Jones
and Bunting roads in Brooklyn at a cost of
$2.8 million which includes State Government
funding support. This project also had significant
environmental outcomes through improved
air quality for surrounding communities.
Council also continued to invest in the public
realm with five major playground upgrades
as part of the ongoing implementation of the
award-winning Creating Better Parks Strategy.
Town centre improvements were also a focus
with Stage 1 of the upgrade of Hampshire
Road from Dickson Street to Devonshire
Road completed.
The $4.8 million, 6.4 kilometre Sunshine Trail
shared user path was opened, stretching
from the Western Ring Road to Stony Creek
into Maribyrnong to Tottenham Station. This
important project was delivered thanks to
funding from the Regional Rail Link Authority.
These major capital investments add vibrancy
to the municipality, make the city more
attractive and add to community pride.
During the year Council also adopted a range
of strategies, policies and plans to guide
service delivery now into the future.
Highlights included the adoption of the Urban
Forest Strategy which strives to increase tree
canopy cover in the City from 6.2 per cent to
30 per cent over the next 30 years. Council
made progress throughout the year to this goal
through the planting of over 85,000 trees.
Council also adopted a new library strategy
to meet changing community needs and the
Community Safety Strategy to help support
a safe, healthy and connected community.
The Ardeer Green Activity Hub Master Plan
focused on the future provision of new
cycling facilities and the Sunvale Community
Park Master Plan will guide the construction
of a community park on part of the former
primary school site in Sunshine.
Good governance was a continued focus
and Council also adopted the Conduct During
Elections Policy and the Councillor Code
of Conduct Major Policy. With the return of
elected representatives in October 2016,
these policies will provide a solid foundation
for the future governance of the City.
Advocacy and engagement
Council continued to participate in a number
of committees which advocate for improved
services, infrastructure, transport, regional
development and sustainability as well as
improved collaboration between industry
and government. These committees include:
• Brooklyn Community Representative Group
• LeadWest
• Metropolitan Local Government Waste Forum
• Metropolitan Transport Forum
• Municipal Association of Victoria (State Council)
• Victorian Local Governance Association (VLGA)
• Ballarat Rail-Line Action Committee
(established February 2016)
Council also facilitated 10 internal committees
with external representation aimed at enhancing
social, cultural and environmental outcomes
in Brimbank. These committees include:
• Australia Day Awards Selection Committee
• Brimbank Arts Advisory Committee
• Brooklyn Community Reference Group
• Brooklyn Industrial Precinct
Strategy Committee
• Errington Precinct Master Plan (Phase 1)
Community Reference Group
• Heritage Advisory Committee
• St Albans Connect Strategic
Partnership Group
• Sunshine Town Centre Partnership Group
• Municipal Emergency Management
Plan Committee
During the year Council continued its
involvement in the Brimbank Social Justice
Coalition. Council also joined the National
Alliance for Gambling Reform to lobby for
legislative changes to reduce the harm caused
by gaming machines. The Brimbank Liquor
Accord was officially launched by Victoria
Police, local venues and Council aimed at
reducing alcohol-related harm.
During the year Council also made a submission
to the State Government’s latest planning
strategy for metropolitan Melbourne, the ‘Plan
Melbourne refresh’. The plan recognises the
important role Brimbank plays in Melbourne’s
future growth.
Council continued to recognised local
community members with the Brimbank
Australia Day Awards. Council also supported
the Brimbank Cup which included more than
30 teams from 15 nationalities. The Brimbank
Sustainable Living Expo was also delivered,
providing community members with the latest
information on how to be more sustainable.
Council also continued to celebrate national
events including International Day Against
Homophobia and Transphobia, NAIDOC Week,
and Refugee Week.
Council successfully sought corporate,
philanthropic and government support
to help bring the
Man lifting cow
sculpture
to Sunshine. This is a fantastic story with
internationally renowned artist John Kelly,
who was raised in Sunshine, wanting to
give back to the community. Thanks to
the generosity of all project partners we
will bring the bronze six-metre sculpture
to Sunshine.
Thank you
This is our final annual report as Administrators
and we are honoured to have served such
a proud and engaged community. It has been
a very rewarding experience to work in
close collaboration with community, industry
and other tiers of government to help
make Brimbank a better place to live,
work and raise a family.
As Administrators, we are excited about
Brimbank’s future as the community
prepares to take this important step –
returning to elected Council representation.
For the past several years it has been our
honour and privilege to serve as the Council
for the wonderful Brimbank community and
we are proud of all that Brimbank has achieved.
As an economic centre, Brimbank makes a
significant contribution to the regional and
state economy, and operates as an important
economic hub, with the largest number of
businesses, the greatest output and the
most jobs of its neighbouring municipalities.
We look forward to cheering from the sidelines
as the proud community of Brimbank continues
to flourish under the new Council.
We would like to take this opportunity to
wish the incoming elected Council well with
its stewardship of the City in the future.
During our term as Administrators we have
all formed a special bond with the area.
Brimbank is transforming and it has been
a privilege to be part of the City’s history.
We would like to thank everyone who has helped
us along the way and we wish the City and
community of Brimbank continued prosperity.
John Watson
, Chair
Jane Nathan
, Administrator
John Tanner AM
, Administrator
L–R: Jane Nathan Administrator, John Watson Chair of Administrators, John Tanner AM Administrator.
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Brimbank City Council
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During the year Council undertook a range
of projects to enhance performance and
provide a better customer experience.
In addition to the Master Customer Database
and website development other major
technology improvements included the
implementation of a new telephony
system and a strong focus on digitisation
to become more paper independent.
Process improvements across planning,
building, engineering and waste were also
developed and implemented to help deliver
more timely and responsive services.
With a continued focus on digital services,
Council launched a community learning portal
for all courses offered through community
centres, neighbourhood houses, libraries,
leisure centres and art centres. The portal
provides term information on the wide variety
of free and low cost courses available through
Council facilities.
During the year Council also partnered with
RMIT University with final year civil engineering
students mapping and analysing the condition
of Brimbank’s 1600 kilometres of footpaths.
This innovative project was a great example
of Council forming strategic partnerships
to provide best value to our ratepayers.
Thank you
I would like to thank all Council’s partners,
the community and our staff for another
positive year in the history of this City.
Working together for a better Brimbank,
it is encouraging to see the community’s
pride as we progress significant projects
and enhance service delivery.
Paul Younis
Chief Executive Officer
Chief Executive Officer’s message
On behalf of Brimbank City Council,
I’m pleased to introduce the
Council’s 2015-2016 Annual Report.
As CEO, I have a number of responsibilities.
These are set out in Section 94 A of the
Local Government Act 1989
.
These responsibilities include:
• Providing an organisational structure that
helps Council operate effectively
• Implementing council decisions as soon as
possible after they are made
• Overseeing council operations and making
sure the objectives of the Council Plan are
being achieved
• Making sure there is an effective code of
conduct in place for council staff
• Providing advice to the Council
• Compliance with relevant legislation.
Highlights
In 2015-2016 Council continued its strong
focus on capital works delivery for the ongoing
improvement of the City. At year’s end the
Brimbank Community and Civic Centre was
nearing completion. This project represents
the largest capital investment in the history
of the City. Blending community and civic
outcomes, the new facility will offer a new
Sunshine Library, community meeting spaces,
a new Council Chamber and the consolidation
of Council offices.
The Brimbank Community and Civic Centre
project is a prime example of how the
organisation is seeking to enhance business
efficiency. The new centre will provide a one
stop shop for Council services with the bulk of
Council operations located under the one roof.
This will reduce travel time between offices
for staff as well as providing convenience for
community members and customers.
During the year the ICT Governance Group
continued to oversee a range of technological
improvements to ultimately provide a better,
more responsive service to our community.
Major projects included the implementation
of a Master Customer Database to better
manage customer data and the planning
and development of a new mobile responsive
website focusing on bringing more services
online. The new website, to be launched
later in 2016, will include over 18 new
online forms which consolidate 93 separate
Council transactions.
Change management was front of mind in
operations over the year as we prepared to
relocate, for the return of Councillors and the
implementation of rate capping. Through a
strong emphasis on internal communications
and information sharing a number of working
groups were established to ensure we were
able to deliver business as usual while also
preparing for significant change. It has been
rewarding to see staff willing to embrace
better ways of working.
Organisational performance
Council met all of the organisational indicators
as part of the Local Government Performance
Reporting Framework; these can be viewed in
the Performance Statement. Following on from
a process established last year, the indicators
were tracked and reported quarterly to the
Audit and Risk Management Committee.
Council’s financial position also remains sound.
At the end of the financial year Council has
a healthy balance sheet and has achieved a
surplus of $19.39 million. More information
is available in the Financial Summary.
The 2015-2016 financial year
results reflect Council’s ongoing
commitment to financial and
infrastructure sustainability
as outlined in Council’s Long
Term Financial Plan.
Financial summary
Council’s financial position continues to remain
sound. A summary of Council’s performance is
outlined below. Detailed information relating to
Council’s financial performance is included within
the Financial Statements and Performance
Statement sections of this Report.
Council has a healthy balance sheet with around
two billion dollars in assets. These comprise
land, building and other infrastructure assets
such as roads, footpaths and cycleways and
drainage. Council’s balance sheet also shows
that Council has equity of $1.863 billion with a
portion of this allocated to specific reserves.
Operating position
Council achieved a surplus of $19.39 million in
2015-2016. This surplus compares favourably
to the budgeted surplus of $18.9 million. The
adjusted underlying surplus of Council, after
removing non-recurrent capital grants, cash
capital contributions and non-monetary capital
contributions, is a surplus of $4.07 million.
This compares favourably to the expected
target of >0 per cent. Sustaining an adjusted
underlying surplus is a critical financial strategy
that provides capacity to renew the $1.9 billion
of community assets under Council’s control.
Liquidity
Cash has decreased by 34 per cent from the prior
year mainly due to completion of a significant
capital works program of $89.7 million during
the year including the construction of the
new Brimbank Community and Civic Centre.
The working capital ratio, which assesses Council’s
ability to meet current commitments, is calculated
by measuring Council’s current assets as a
percentage of current liabilities. Council’s result
of 145.44 per cent is an indicator of satisfactory
financial position and within the expected target
band of 120 per cent to 200 per cent.
Obligations
Council aims to ensure that it is able to maintain
its infrastructure assets at the expected levels,
while at the same time continuing to deliver the
services needed by the community.
At the end of the 2015-2016 year Council’s
debt ratio, which is measured by comparing
interest bearing loans and borrowings to rate
revenue, was 46 per cent, which was within
the expected target band of 20-60 per cent.
Council’s asset renewal ratio, which is measured
by comparing asset renewal expenditure to
depreciation, was 76 per cent, which is below the
expected target band of 90-110 per cent. This is
due to asset renewal falling in the 2016 year as
capital funding is diverted into constructing the
Brimbank Community and Civic Centre.
Financial summary
01
Introduction |
Chief Executive Officer’s message
|
Financial summary
Underlying Surplus / (Deficit) $’000)
Working Capital Ratio (%)
50 0
100 150
200 166.71
117.92
93.66
200.66
145.44
250
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014–15
2015–16
2,000 0
4,000
6,000
8,000
16,386
565
5,058
13,787
4,077
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
18,000
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014–15
2015–16

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2015-2016
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5.00
0.00
10.00
15.00
20.00
18.00
25.00
42.00
35.00
46.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
2011–12
2012–13
2013–14
2014–15
2015–16
Brimbank City Council provides a
range of services and programs
that reflect the needs and
expectations of the community.
Council’s service provision upholds the vision
for Brimbank as the dynamic centre of
Melbourne’s west with a community that
is proud, diverse and connected.
The Annual Budget 2015-2016 aimed to
deliver this vision while keeping rates as low
as practicable. This was particularly relevant
given the Victorian Government’s commitment
to introduce rate capping in 2016-2017.
The introduction of the 2.5% rate cap means
up to $24 million will need to be saved from
the budget over the next four years.
Council has taken measures to manage some
of the future impact this financial year by
identifying additional savings in the current
budget. These savings amount to around
$1.9 million and include materials,
environmental efficiencies and other items.
Council’s operations are broad ranging and
include managing roads and infrastructure,
waste and environment services, public
facilities, the community’s wellbeing, and
other services and programs. Community
take-up of the services and programs show
the importance of these Council functions.
The Council Plan 2013–2017 outlines
Council’s Strategic Directions, which are
supported by a number of other Council
strategies, plans and policies. This includes
the Annual Budget 2015–2016, which
highlights project priorities and spending.
Council’s Strategic Objectives are monitored
by a set of service performance indicators and
measures. They offer a corporate framework
for the delivery of services, facilities, support
and advocacy, and for achieving the vision and
objectives outlined in the Brimbank Community
Plan. The Council Plan sets out Council’s
key strategic directions and actions for a
four-year period.
Council’s actions are guided by Victorian and
Australian legislation which supports good
governance and enables Council to responsibly
deliver a community first approach.
Major capital works
During 2015-2016 the major capital works
included the following:
Brimbank Community and Civic Centre
The $52 million Brimbank Community
and Civic Centre is a once-in-a-generation
project constructed on Hampshire Road
in the Sunshine Town Centre.
The purpose-built building includes:
• A new Sunshine Library over two levels
• A new Sunshine Customer Service Centre
• A range of community meeting spaces, and
• Exhibition spaces.
The Brimbank Community and Civic Centre also
provides new offices for Council staff previously
located across various office locations around
Sunshine and Keilor, as well as tenant spaces
for other businesses.
Construction commenced in November 2014.
At the end of the financial year construction
works were almost finalised with an open
date planned for 25 July.
St Albans Community Centre
and The Bowery Theatre
Redevelopment of the St Albans Community
Centre (formerly Errington Community Centre)
and The Bowery Theatre commenced in
August 2015.
The project includes the construction of
a two-storey building, in addition to the
reconfiguration and improvement of existing
facilities including halls, meeting and activity
spaces, as well as support amenities such
as kitchens and toilets.
New facilities will include a 200-seat flexible
performing arts space with associated support
spaces, additional meeting rooms, rehearsal
room, a dance space, art and craft studio,
consultation room, office support space
and education/training spaces.
The project also includes a civic entry plaza,
landscaping and site improvements to integrate
the newly refurbished and expanded facility
within the wider, cohesive, Errington Precinct.
The total cost of the project is $8.96 million
and includes $2.5 million from the St Albans
Community Centre Co-Operative Ltd and a
$500,000 Community Support Fund grant
from the Victorian Government.
Construction is expected to be completed
in late 2016.
Extension of the Keilor Basketball
and Netball Stadium
Construction of the extension of the Keilor
Basketball and Netball Stadium commenced
in September 2014 and was officially opened
in December 2015.
The $6.5 million extension includes three new
basketball and netball courts. These courts
are expected to host high level games
and attract up to elite level training and
competitions to Brimbank. The extension
also includes a 200-seat grandstand, change
rooms and toilets, a courtyard, and storage
shed. The project included construction
of the car park in front of the stadium.
Courts have been line-marked for other
uses including badminton and volleyball
to ensure they meet Brimbank’s growing
sporting demands.
The project was supported by investments by
the Keilor Basketball Association ($1.2 million)
and Victorian Government ($650,000).
Upgrade of Hampshire Road
(Dickson Street to Devonshire Road)
The Stage 1 Hampshire Road, Sunshine,
upgrade works commenced in May 2015
and were completed in November 2015.
The works were in line with the Hampshire
Road Master Plan 2014, which outlines a vision
for the evolution of Sunshine’s premier ‘main
street’ in four stages.
Stage 1 works included footpath and street
lighting upgrades, a raised pedestrian crossing
and construction of a sculptural seating wall.
Works cost $1,180,000 including a $200,000
grant from the Victorian Government’s
Community Infrastructure Fund.
Continuation of parks
and playground upgrades
In continuing the implementation of Brimbank’s
Creating Better Parks – Open Space and
Playground Policy and Plan, Council completed
five playground upgrades during 2015-2016.
Upgrades included Harefield Reserve Suburban
Park in Kealba at a cost of $440,000, and a total
of $400,000 in neighbourhood park upgrades at:
• International Gardens Reserve, St Albans
• Willy Singer Reserve, Keilor Downs
• RT Pollard Gardens, Sunshine
• Santa Monica Reserve, Keilor Lodge.
Roads, footpaths and pedestrian facilities
Council continued to implement the Road
Asset Management Plan through the delivery
of $23.6 million in road and footpath works.
Projects included the construction of Jones
and Bunting roads in Brooklyn at a cost of
$2.6 million, as well as:
• Completion of delivery of the asphalt overlay
program comprising 81 streets ($2.8 million)
• $500,000 footpath rehabilitation program
• Construction of Adams Street
(Maid Road West to Gladstone Street),
St Albans ($700,000)
• Construction of Burnside Street (Ballarat
Road to Poole Street), Deer Park ($797,000)
Sports facilities
Council continued to invest in upgrades at
sporting facilities across the municipality
and completed a range of projects, including
the redevelopment of Larissa Reserve sports
pavilion at a cost of $1 million.
Other projects included:
• Installation of new sports reserve lighting
at Selwyn Park Reserve and Lloyd Reserve
as part of Council’s sports ground lighting
upgrade program ($340,000)
• Sports ground reconstruction of Pitch 3
at Churchill Reserve ($720,000)
• Cricket nets upgrade at Robert Bruce
Reserve ($97,000)
• Reshaping of the Keilor Park oval no. 5
and an upgrade of the irrigation on ovals
4 and 5 ($80,000)
• Tennis court resurfacing at Delahey
and Deer Park Tennis Clubs ($85,185)
• Installation of a synthetic wicket at
Keilor Recreation Reserve ($20,000)
Financial summary (continued)
Description of operations
100
20 30
40
76
64
61
57
50 60
70 80
90
2011–12
76
2012–13
2013 –14
2014 –15
2015–16
Debt Ratio (%)
Asset Renewal (%)
Rate Concentration (%)
66 64
68 70
72
69
72
76
70
74 76
78
2011–12
2012–13
72
2013 –14
2014 –15
2015–16
01
Introduction |
Financial summary
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Description of operations
Stability and efficiency
Council raises a wide range of revenues
including rates, user fees, fines, grants and
contributions. Despite this, Council’s rates
concentration, which compares rate revenue
to adjusted underlying revenue, was 72 per
cent for the 2015-2016 year, which is towards
the top end of the expected target band of
40-80 per cent. Council has focused on
broadening its revenue base and for the
2015-2016 year was able to keep its rate
increase to 5.4 per cent. This resulted in
an average residential rate per residential
assessment of $1543, which compares
favourably to similar councils in the outer
metropolitan area.
Economic factors
Rate capping
In 2015, the Victorian Government introduced
rate capping legislation in the form of its
“Fair Go Rates System” (FGRS). The FGRS or
rate capping introduces an annual rate cap
set by the Minister for Local Government
which controls general rate increases for
all councils during that financial year.
On 22 December 2015, the Minister for Local
Government, the Hon Natalie Hutchins MP,
advised an annual rate for the 2016-2017
financial year of 2.5 per cent. Councils can seek
approval to raise an increase above this figure
through a variation with the Essential Service
Commission (ESC).
Council has maintained the rate cap of 2.5 per
cent for the 2016-2017 Budget. However this
is lower than the rate increase Council had
recommended in its 2015-2016 Long Term
Financial Plan and other previous budget
documents that had been endorsed following
community consultation. This meant that
Council had to find additional reductions in
operating costs in the 2016-2017 budget.
Financial assistance grants
A freeze on indexation from the Commonwealth
Government’s financial assistance grants
program to local government resulted in a
reduction of $0.35 million per annum over
the period from 2013-2014 to 2017-2018.
State Government landfill levy
State Government landfill levy is set to
increase by 3.3 per cent.
Labour cost increases
Wage inflation rates as per Council Enterprise
Bargaining Agreement (EBA 7) of 3.3 per cent
is currently higher than current Consumer
Price Index (CPI) rate of 1.9 per cent.

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October 2015
November 2015
December 2015
Significant service achievements 2015-2016
July 2015
August 2015
September 2015
• Council, together with the Brimbank
community, celebrated NAIDOC
Week 2015 with a flag raising ceremony,
a smoking ceremony, Welcome to Country
and the raising of the Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander flags along with
entertainment by Indigenous performers
and children’s activities.
• Council launched Branch Out Brimbank –
an initiative to encourage a love of trees
across the municipality.
• Council partnered with RMIT University
to undertake an innovative project that
saw final year civil engineering students
map and analyse the condition of
Brimbank’s 1600km of footpaths.
• Work on the $3 million St Albans Community
Centre redevelopment commenced.
When complete it will boast a 200-seat
performing arts space with associated
support spaces, additional meeting rooms,
rehearsal room, a dance space, art and craft
studio, a consultation room, office support
space, and education/training spaces.
• Small business operators took part in
an exciting program of events provided
by Brimbank City Council as part of the
annual Victorian Small Business Festival.
• Council adopted the Ardeer Green Activity
Hub Master Plan: Cycle Sports Facilities 2015.
The Master Plan outlines a vision for the
Forrest Street Reserve site in Ardeer that
includes a one-kilometre long and eight
metre wide criterium circuit, a small, single
track cross country mountain bike circuit,
and a recreational or competition BMX track.
• Council announced a proposal to introduce
new planning controls to ensure potentially
contaminated sites in urban renewal areas
are assessed before housing and other
new uses take place. The Environmental
Audit Overlay (EAO) will be applied under
Amendment C173 which will play an
important role in informing the community
of the location of known or potentially
contaminated land in Brimbank.
• The Brimbank District Liquor Accord
was officially launched by Victoria Police,
participating venues and Council, aimed
at reducing alcohol-related harm within
the Brimbank community.
• Council launched B-active@Pollard – a
program of fun, fitness activities at the
RT Pollard Gardens, Hampshire Road,
Sunshine. Funded by VicHealth, and
delivered with a number of partners
including Victoria Police, the program
encouraged people to be active outdoors.
• Council opened the $4.8 million, 6.4km
Sunshine Trail shared user path. Funded
by the Regional Rail Link Authority, it
stretches from the Western Ring Road to
Stony Creek in Brimbank, where it continues
into Maribyrnong to Tottenham Station.
• Council welcomed $250,000 from the
Victorian Government’s Public Safety
Infrastructure Fund for the Dawson Street
Precinct and the Sunshine Town Centre.
• Council officially launched the Brimbank
Children’s Plan 2015-2019 which guides
the development and coordination
of education, care, health services,
infrastructure and activities for children
up to 12 years and their families.
• The annual Brimbank Animal Expo was
held on Saturday 10 October at Westvale
Community Centre in St Albans. The fun,
family-friendly event featured stalls and
demonstrations from a range of animal
organisations and local vets.
• Council formally announced the
commissioning of John Kelly’s 6-metre
bronze sculpture
Man lifting cow
.
The project was made possible through
significant financial and in-kind support
from both philanthropic and corporate
organisations. Mr Kelly’s other sculptures
have been exhibited in Paris, London,
Melbourne and Ireland.
• Council completed Stage 1 of the Hampshire
Road Master Plan. The $1.18 million
upgrade of the section of Hampshire Road,
between Devonshire Road and Dickson
Street, included upgrades to footpaths,
street lighting, the installation of a raised
pedestrian crossing, and construction of a
sculptural seating wall.
• Council endorsed a strategic plan that will
improve the quality and use of walking,
jogging and cycling paths. The
Western
Metropolitan Regional Trails Strategic Plan
(West Trails) is an initiative developed by six
local councils in Melbourne’s west that aims
to improve connectivity, quality and use of
regional trails in Melbourne’s west.
• The $6.5 million three-court extension of the
Keilor Basketball and Netball Stadium in Keilor
Park was officially opened. The extension
was funded by Council $4.65 million), Keilor
Basketball Association Inc. ($1.2 million) and
the Victorian Government ($650,000).
• The Minister for Planning approved planning
scheme amendment C105, unlocking
Sunshine’s development potential by
rezoning redundant industrial land.
• Council made a submission to the State
Government’s latest planning strategy
for metropolitan Melbourne – the ‘Plan
Melbourne Refresh’. The Plan recognises
Sunshine as a National Employment Cluster
and a Metropolitan Activity Centre. It
identifies the Sunshine Corridor, St Albans
and Deer Park as urban renewal areas, and
includes Brimbank’s southern industrial
areas, including the Brooklyn Industrial
Precinct, in the state significant Western
Industrial Precinct.
01
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Significant service achievements 2015-2016

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Significant service achievements 2015-2016 (continued)
• Winners of the 2016 Brimbank Australia
Day Awards were announced at a special
ceremony attended by award winners
and nominees, their families and friends.
The winners were: Citizen of the Year,
Despina Havelas; Young Citizen of the
Year, Nyakeer Akoul; Community Wellbeing
Award, The Sunshine Hospital Visitor Guide;
Environmental Achievement Award, Linda
Roberts; Cultural Achievement Award,
Debbie Qadri; Educator of the Year,
Beatriz Castillo; Lifetime Achievement
Award, Alan Dash; and Essential Services
Excellence, Margaret Wood and Malcolm
Peacock, Red Cross.
• Brimbank hosted Victoria’s largest Australia
Day Citizenship Ceremony where 220
new citizens from 38 different countries
and across generations were welcomed.
• More than 30 teams, representing more
than 15 nationalities, competed for the
2016 Brimbank Cup at Green Gully Reserve,
Keilor Downs. The award-winning soccer
tournament attracted men’s and women’s
teams from local soccer clubs and community
groups. Westvale SC and Melbourne Knights
were the victors, taking out the men’s and
women’s finals, respectively.
• On Saturday 20 February the Brimbank
Sustainable Living Expo was held at Westvale
Community Centre, St Albans, featuring a
guest appearance by gardening expert
Jane Edmanson from ABC’s
Gardening
Australia
and 3AW, along with information
sessions on topics such as beekeeping,
grafting fruit trees and edible gardening.
• Light Up Sunshine delivered a series of
community events over the summer months,
attracting thousands of people to the city
centre. The program had an additional focus
on arts which ‘lit up’ the town centre,
including live music and movies in the park.
• Council launched a $485,000 cogeneration
unit installed at the Sunshine Leisure Centre.
The unit is expected to save $60,000 a
year and reduce the centre’s greenhouse
emissions by 30 per cent. Cogeneration uses
natural gas to generate 50 per cent of the
centre’s electricity.
• Council successfully prosecuted a skip bin
operator who was using industrial land in
Reid Street, Ardeer, for an illegal recycling
business. The tenant operator was ordered
to pay fines and costs of over $65,000.
The land owner was also found guilty of
not obtaining a planning permit for the use
of the land.
• Council welcomed the Victorian Government’s
announcement it will contribute $100,000
towards the $560,000 project to build change
rooms at Bon Thomas Reserve, Deer Park.
• Council adopted the concept plan for the
future design upgrade of Keilor Village.
It features an upgrade of the main shopping
strip with new paving, two large seating
hubs, furniture and landscaping, as well
as a rain garden with a viewing deck.
• Council secured $200,000 in funding for
the
Brimbank Growing Healthy Communities
project. The project is expected to run for
two years based at the Westvale Community
Centre in Kings Park and the Hunt Club
Community Arts Centre in Deer Park.
• Council adopted the Urban Forest Strategy,
which outlines Council’s intention to increase
its tree canopy coverage from 6.2 per cent
to 30 per cent over the next 30 years.
• Council hosted an event to celebrate IDAHOT
– International Day Against Homophobia and
Transphobia – on Tuesday 17 May. The day
commemorates the date on which the World
Health Organisation made the decision to
remove homosexuality from the list of mental
disorders in 1990. Council raised the rainbow
flag which was kept flying for a week.
• Council celebrated the completion of $20,000
worth of lighting improvements in Sunshine.
The lighting upgrade complemented the
$1.8 million public realm and street lighting
upgrade of Hampshire Road.
• Council announced the new performing
arts theatre at the $8.9 million St Albans
Community Centre would be named in
honour of internationally recognised
performance artist and designer, the
late Leigh Bowery. Mr Bowery grew up in
Brimbank and was considered one of the
most influential arts figures in London and
New York during the 1980s and 1990s.
Council also announced it would honour
former Mayor and Councillor at the City of
Keilor, Jack Sheridan, by naming the centre’s
Atrium ‘The Jack Sheridan Atrium’ after
the local resident who died in early 2016.
• Council successfully prosecuted a land owner
and occupier of a property in North Sunshine
for carrying out works without the necessary
building and planning approvals. The offending
land owner and occupier were both found
guilty and each ordered to pay fines as well
as Council’s full legal and investigation costs,
which amounted to a total of $20,000.
• Council adopted the Council Plan 2013-2017
(Year 4 update) that will continue to
strengthen Brimbank’s position as a
dynamic centre of the west.
• Council adopted its 2016-2017
Annual Budget, which met the Victorian
Government’s legislated cap of 2.5 per
cent rates rise and focused on delivering
value to the community.
• The Brimbank Business Breakfast was
held at Sunshine Golf Club where local small
business operators met to discuss potential
opportunities for growth. The Victorian
Planning Authority’s (formerly known as the
Metropolitan Planning Authority) business
engagement program for the Sunshine
National Employment Cluster Framework
Plan was launched at the event.
• Council celebrated Refugee Week with a
function to raise awareness about issues
affecting refugees and celebrate the positive
contributions made by refugees to Brimbank.
• Council moved forward with plans to
upgrade the Keilor Municipal Office on
Old Calder Highway into a mixed-use facility,
with the award of a $1.7 million contract
for the building’s refurbishment to Harris
HMC Interiors Pty Ltd.
• Council finalised plans for the development
of the Sunvale Community Park on the site
of the former Sunvale Primary School in
Sunshine. The plans include dedicated play
spaces, a diagonal central pedestrian spine
with solar lighting, an Indigenous-themed
circuit path network, an edible garden,
a picnic shelter and more.
• The Brimbank Community Fund grants were
awarded, with two recipients receiving
$5000 each. The Brimbank Community
Fund is a charitable fund account of the
Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation that
provides a permanent and growing source
of much-needed investment for the
Brimbank community.
January 2016
February 2016
March 2016
April 2016
May 2016
June 2016
01
Introduction |
Significant service achievements 2015-2016

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Revised Business Association
Support Policy 2015 (July 2015)
The Business Association Support Policy
was adopted in 2011, and encourages business
communities to actively participate in the
management and improved performance
of their respective town centres. This policy
was updated to ensure compliance with
the
Local Government Act 1989
, as well as
to enhance transparency, and more clearly
identify roles and responsibilities.
Revised Special Rate and Charge Scheme
Policy 2015 – Marketing Promotion and
Business Development in Town Centres
(July 2015)
The Special Rate and Charge Scheme
Policy – Marketing Promotion and Business
Development in Town Centres was adopted
in December 2011. The policy was prepared
in response to interest from the St Albans and
Sunshine Business Associations, to pursue a
special rate scheme for their respective centres.
Council has since successfully introduced
special rate schemes in both centres. This policy
was updated to ensure compliance with the
Local Government Act 1989
, as well as to more
clearly identify roles, responsibilities and the
conditions under which Council will support the
introduction of a special rate/charge scheme.
Living Brooklyn Integrated Water Cycle
Management Strategy 2015 (August 2015)
Brimbank’s Living Brooklyn Integrated Water
Management Strategy is one aspect of the
ongoing work being undertaken in the Brooklyn
Industrial Precinct under the broader Brooklyn
Evolution Strategy 2012 which focuses on
the precinct’s transition to sustainability.
Living Brooklyn has brought together people
who manage, use, or are affected by water at
the Brooklyn Industrial Precinct, to transition
towards a healthier future, using water as the
catalyst for change. It is focused on building
connections and knowledge around how
to establish and maintain a sustainable
industrial environment for the future.
Ardeer Green Activity Hub Master Plan:
Cycle Sports Facilities 2015
(September 2015)
The Master Plan outlines a vision for the
Forrest Street Reserve site in Ardeer that
includes: a one-kilometre long and eight-metre
wide criterium circuit, a small, single track
cross country mountain bike circuit, and
a recreational or competition BMX track.
Loan Repayment Reserve for Interest
Only Debt Policy 2015 – Major Policy
(September 2015)
In May 2014, Council resolved to participate
in the Municipal Association of Victoria’s Debt
Procurement Project – Local Government
Funding Vehicle (LGFV) bond issuance for an
amount of $30 million. This policy provides for
the allocation of a set amount of funds from
Council’s budget each year to the reserve, to
ensure sufficient funds are in the reserve at
the date of maturity to repay the outstanding
principal, and provides for reporting each year
in the Annual Budget and Annual Report.
Brimbank Community Safety Strategy
2015-2019 (December 2015)
This strategy outlines Council’s strategic
role and approach to building a safe, healthy
and connected community. It aligns with the
Community Plan 2009-2030 and Council Plan
2013-2017 strategic direction of creating safe,
healthy communities.
2016
Conduct During Elections Policy 2016
(February 2016)
The Conduct During Elections Policy 2016
details requirements, restrictions and
procedures for Councillors, candidates and
Council officers during an election period.
More broadly, it also states Council resources
are not to be used for candidacy purposes at
any time (including State and Federal elections).
Library Strategy 2015-2020 (March 2016)
The Library Strategy 2015-2020 provides a
framework for planning and developing library
collections, community engagement and online
services to meet changing community needs.
The strategy supports the development of the
library’s annual business plans, which detail
initiatives and activities to address priority areas.
Councillor Code of Conduct Major Policy
2016 (April 2016)
The
Local Government Act 1989
sets out
standards of conduct for Councillors, and
specific arrangements to deal with misconduct.
Section 76C of the Act requires a council to
have a Code of Conduct for Councillors. In April
2016 Council adopted the Councillor Code of
Conduct 2016 as a Major Policy. This triggers a
community consultation process prior to any
amendment or revocation to the Code.
Keilor Village Concept Plan 2016
(April 2016)
The Keilor Village Concept Plan addresses
recommendations made in the Keilor Village
Vision Document. It outlines a vision for Keilor
Council adopted the following strategies, policies and plans in 2015-2016.
The
Local Government (Brimbank
Council) Act 2009
to dismiss
elected Councillors was passed
by the Victorian Parliament
on 12 November 2009.
Administrators act as the Council, and have
no additional power outside the formal
decision-making process as outlined
in the
Local Government Act 1989
.
Administrators have no special
responsibility to the Victorian Government,
nor any special reporting relationship.
The Governor in Council appointed a panel of
three administrators on 17 November 2009 on
the advice of the Minister for Local Government.
This panel was to be in place until the
Local Government elections in 2012.
In May 2012, the Victorian Government
extended the Administration of the Brimbank
City Council to March 2015 with changes
to the composition of the panel taking
place from October 2012.
In May 2014, the Victorian Government
introduced legislation into parliament to further
extend the term of Administrators until October
2016, aligning with state-wide Council elections.
Brimbank’s Administrators are responsible for
making decisions about local issues and ensuring
the ongoing enhancement of the liveability,
productivity and sustainability of the City and
for all members of the Brimbank community.
Village as an attractive, inviting and compact
local centre offering a broad range of retail
opportunities and services, while preserving
and enhancing the distinctive natural, historic
and semi-rural character of the Keilor Village.
Brimbank Sports Facility Development Plan
– Year 3 update (May 2016)
Council adopted a Year 3 update of the 10-year
Brimbank Sports Facility Development Plan.
The plan identifies Brimbank’s sports facility
development needs and provides direction
on how best to manage the identified gaps
in provision.
Urban Forest Strategy 2016-2046
(May 2016)
The Urban Forest Strategy is a strategic
approach to increasing canopy cover in Brimbank
from 6.2 per cent to 30 per cent over the next 30
years. The strategy sets a strategic framework
for planting trees on streets, urban parks, along
waterways and to encourage planting in private
open space. It aims to deliver positive health,
social, economic and environmental outcomes
for the Brimbank community.
Council Plan 2013-2017 – Year 4 update
(June 2016)
Council adopted the Council Plan 2013-2017
(Year 4 update) that will continue to strengthen
Brimbank’s position as a dynamic centre of the
west. The Council Plan clearly articulates the
areas of focus for the organisation over the
next 12 months.
Sunvale Community Park Master Plan
(June 2016)
Council purchased a portion of the former
Sunvale Primary School site in Neil Street,
Sunshine, for the purpose of creating a
new public open space to serve the existing
community and future residents of the
Sunshine Town Centre. After extensive
community consultation, a draft Sunvale
Community Park Master Plan was prepared to
guide the development of the site as public
open space.
Brimbank Multi-Deck Car Park Management
Plan (June 2016)
The Brimbank Multi-Deck Car Park is due for
completion in late 2016 and will provide a total
of 361 spaces, including 248 spaces allocated
to Council spaces and 113 car spaces available
to the general public. The Management Plan
details the rationale for the proposed parking
rates, and recommends a fee structure for all
users of the car park.
To view these documents or other Council
plans, strategies, policies or guidelines,
visit
www.brimbank.vic.gov.au
The Administrators act as
members of Council and govern on
behalf of the citizens of Brimbank.
Brimbank City Council operates under
the requirements of the
Local Government
Act 1989
.
Brimbank City Council has an obligation
to achieve best value for its community
and stakeholders and to ensure the
community receives the most benefit
from available resources.
The Council Plan guides future planning in
Brimbank and establishes priorities for action.
Strategies, policies and plans adopted
Our Council
Council’s annual planning process involves:
• Engaging with and seeking input
from the community
• Analysing social, political, economic
and natural environment factors
and influences setting the strategic
objectives of the Council
• Developing strategies to achieve
the objectives
• Establishing strategic indicators
for monitoring the achievement
of the objectives
• Determining financial and non-financial
resource requirements
• Coordinating the implementation
of strategies, and
• Monitoring, reporting, evaluating
and improving performance.
The Administrators are guided in their
decision-making by legislation and a range of
Council policies, including, but not limited to:
Local Government Act 1989
Planning and Environment Act 1987
Road Management Act 2004
Brimbank Council Plan 2013–2017
General Local Law 2008
Brimbank Community Plan 2009–2030
Governance (Major Policy Consultation) 2014
Governance (Meeting Procedure)
Local Law No. 1, 2015
Council plans, strategies and policies
are available to view on the website,
www.brimbank.vic.gov.au
The Brimbank Administrators Panel:
John Watson, Chair
Mr John Watson is the Chair of the Panel
of Administrators.
He was appointed by the Governor in Council
on the advice of the Minister for Local
Government and commenced on 1 November
2012. Mr Watson worked previously as the
Executive Director of Local Government
Victoria, within the Department of Planning
and Community Development, since early 2007.
John has more than 40 years of experience
working with Local Government, including
as Chief Executive Officer of the Shire of Bulla,
and the Moonee Valley and Hume city councils,
and also at the Victorian Government level,
specialising in the area of governance
and legislation.
M
0419 984 675
E
johnw@brimbank.vic.gov.au
Jane Nathan, Administrator
Jane Nathan was appointed as an Administrator
on 20 November 2012.
About the Administrators
She has a long and successful association with
Local Government. She was a Commissioner of
Brimbank City Council following amalgamations
in 1994, and prior to that was a Councillor and
Mayor for the City of Hawthorn.
Jane is well known in the Local Government
sector, particularly for her skills and experience
in community relations and strategic planning.
M
0419 101 411
E
janen@brimbank.vic.gov.au
John Tanner AM, Administrator
John Tanner AM was appointed as an
Administrator on 11 March 2014, bringing
extensive experience in Local Government,
small business, and regional development.
He was a Commissioner of the Shire of Delatite
from 1994 to 1997 following amalgamations.
He is well regarded for his expertise in
community engagement, management,
governance, and strategic planning.
M
0409 417 849
E
johnt@brimbank.vic.gov.au
01
Introduction
|
Strategies, policies and plans adopted
|
Our Council
|
About the Administrators
|
About the Council
About the Council
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2015-2016
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Executive Management Team at 30 June 2016
Paul Younis
CEO
Paul Younis was appointed Chief Executive
Officer of Brimbank City Council in 2015.
He has over 20 years of experience in a range
of senior management positions within local
government and the private sector.
Paul commenced with the City of Brimbank
in 2010 as Director Infrastructure and
Environment. During this time Paul was
seconded for six months as Acting Chief
Executive Officer of Buloke Shire Council in
Western Victoria. Prior to joining Brimbank,
Paul was Chief Executive Officer of Corangamite
Shire Council, where he also held the position
of Director Infrastructure and Development.
Along with experience in the water sector,
Paul has also worked at consulting engineering
companies based in Frankston and Mornington.
Bachelor of Civil Engineering,
Post Graduate qualifications in Law,
Graduate Diploma in Business.
02
Our people
02
Our People |
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2016
Stephen Sully
Executive Officer
Positioning Brimbank
Stephen Sully, previously General Manager
City Development, was appointed Executive
Officer Strategic Positioning in September
2012. In this role Stephen works with the Chief
Executive Officer and Council to advocate and
attract investment, development, facilities and
services to key locations of the municipality.
Stephen is an urban planner with over 30
years of professional experience. He has led
numerous planning and economic development
areas for local and Victorian Government.
Prior to joining Brimbank Stephen was director
of a private planning consultancy.
Bachelor of Arts Urban Studies.
Neil Whiteside
Director Infrastructure
and Environment
Neil Whiteside has worked in Local Government
for over 15 years in various management roles.
In October 2015 Neil was appointed to
the position of Director Infrastructure and
Environment. He previously held the position
of Director Community Wellbeing from June
2012, and prior to that held the position of
Group Manager Operations at Council from
January 2008. Prior to joining Brimbank,
Neil held several management positions at
Whittlesea City Council.
Bachelor of Education/Environmental Science,
Masters in Environmental Science, Williamson
Leadership Fellow. Neil is currently completing
a Masters of Public Policy and Management.
Helen Morrissey
Director Corporate and
Community Relations
With over 30 years’ experience in Local
Government Helen joined Brimbank in
November 2010. Previously Helen was the
General Manager of Corporate Services at
Maribyrnong City Council. Prior to that, she
had a variety of management roles in both
community services and corporate areas at
Darebin City Council.
Helen is responsible for the Corporate and
Community Relations Division that has a focus
on providing reliable, consistent value-adding
support to internal services across the Council
in a range of areas, enabling the organisation
to continuously improve and deliver efficient
effective services while improving Council’s
relation with the community.
Graduate Diploma in Social Science,
Diploma Human Service Research & Evaluation,
Certificate of Marketing Practice.
Kath Brackett
Director Community Wellbeing
Kath is an experienced senior manager
who has worked in a variety of roles in
Local Government for the past 20 years.
Prior to that she worked in the not-for
profit and peak NGO sectors. She is also an
experienced non-executive Board director.
Kath has a strong commitment to social
justice and a passion for local democracy
and engaging local communities.
Bachelor of Social Work and a Certificate
in Human Resource Management,
Masters of Arts (Social Policy),
Graduate of the Australian Institute
of Company Directors (GAICD).
Stuart Menzies
Director City Development
Stuart Menzies is an urban planner with 25
years’ experience. Stuart joined Brimbank
City Council in 2005 and was appointed to the
position of Director City Development in June
2013. Prior to working with Brimbank, Stuart
held management roles at Yarra Ranges Shire
Council and Nillumbik Shire Council, and has
worked in China with Australian Volunteers
International advising on sustainability policy
and social impact assessment.
Stuart is a Vice President – Local Government
of the Planning Institute of Australia’s Victorian
Committee.
Bachelor of Applied Science (Planning),
Graduate Diploma in Public Policy,
Masters of Environmental Studies.
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As at 30 June 2016, Council employed 1321 people (827 full-time equivalent), which is a slight decrease from 2014-2015.
Workforce turnover overall increased slightly to 11.92 per cent, a 1.92 percentage point increase on 2014-2015. Headcount reduced by 47 for the year,
with full-time equivalent (FTE) figures reducing by 27 overall. The average age of Council’s workforce is 45.5 years. Seventeen per cent of Council
employees are in the 61-plus age group, with these staff predominantly employed as School Crossing Supervisors and within Council’s Operations Centre.
Organisation structure at 30 June 2016
Workforce profile
Manager
Community Care
John MacDonagh
>
CEO
Paul Younis
Director Community
Wellbeing
Kath Brackett
Director
Infrastructure
and Environment
Neil Whiteside
Director
Corporate and
Community Relations
Helen Morrissey
Manager Leisure
Services
Ashley Fleming
Manager Libraries
and Learning
Christine McAllister
Acting Manager
Community Planning
and Development
Lillian Santoro-Woolmer
Manager
City Strategy
Leanne Deans
Manager Building
and Development
Compliance
Ashley Hansen
Manager City
Planning
Kristen Gilbert
Executive Officer
Positioning
Brimbank
Stephen Sully
Manager
Engineering
Services
Adrian Ashford
Manager
Urban Design
Adrian Gray
Manager
Environment
Matthew Aquilina
Group Manager
Operations
Tom Razmovski
Manager People
and Performance
Helen Lawless
Manager
Financial Services
Jacqueline Vanderholt
Manager
Governance
Melanie Fleer
Manager Revenue
and Quality Systems
Vacant
Manager
Media and
Communications
Rebecca Solomon
Chief Financial
Strategist
Shane Marr
Manager
Property
Trent Prince
Manager
Asset Services
Dominic Di Martino
Acting Manager
City Compliance
John Petroro
Manager
Customer Service
Paul Tate
Acting Manager
Procurement and
Tendering
Ollie Kovaljev
Employees by division and employment status
Division
Status
Female
Male
Total
CEO & Councillors
Full-Time
1
1
2
Part-Time
0
1
1
Casual
0
0
0
Corporate &
Community Relations
Full-Time
53
25
78
Part-Time
22
1
23
Casual
2
2
4
Infrastructure
& Environment
Full-Time
22
245
267
Part-Time
16
6
22
Casual
0
0
0
City Development
Full-Time
28
35
63
Part-Time
52
66
118
Casual
13
17
30
Community Wellbeing
Full-Time
103
40
143
Part-Time
310
73
383
Casual
136
51
187
Brimbank total
758
563
1,321
Director
City Development
Stuart Menzies
02
Our People |
Organisation structure at 30 June 2016
|
Workforce profile
Age
Group
Female Male Total 2016
< 21
22
18
40
21 - 25
47
56
103
26 - 30
51
35
86
31 - 35
73
43
116
36 - 40
69
62
131
41 - 45
92
48
140
46 - 50
116 62
178
51 - 55
99
55
154
56 - 60
93
55
148
61 >
96 129
225
Status
2015-2016
Casual
221
Full-Time
553
Part-Time
547
Total
1,321
Council Staff
Age groups
Brimbank total employment status

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Preventing men’s violence
against women
In 2015-2016, Council actively worked to advance
gender equity and prevent violence against
women in the community by implementing the
Brimbank City Council’s Plan to Prevent Men’s
Violence Against Women
, 2015-2019.
Achievements:
Hosted the Brimbank Leadership Alumni
forum to raise community awareness about
preventing violence against women.
Hosted the International Women’s Day
forum to celebrate the achievement of
Brimbank women and raise awareness
about preventing violence against women.
Implemented the Brimbank Stepping Stone
micro-enterprise program in partnership
with Brotherhood of St Lawrence to build
the capacity of refugee and disadvantaged
migrant women in running a business.
Implemented the Brimbank Leadership
Program that aimed to provide an
opportunity for community members to
build and strengthen their capacity in
community leadership and participation.
Implemented the African Women Leadership
Program that aimed to build capacity of
participants in engaging with Council and to
be actively involved in community activities.
Encouraged female community members to
plan local activities during the neighbourhood
day. Eleven women applied for the Neighbour
Day Grants and hosted successful events at
their respective local areas.
Encouraged women to become members of
the Brimbank Safety Working Group (SWG) in
order to contribute to understanding of local
safety issues and develop actions to improve
safety perceptions.
Partnered with Latrobe University,
cohealth, Maribyrnong City Council, Hobsons
Bay City Council and Moonee Valley City
Council to implement the
Living Safer
Sexual Lives
project to build capacity of
people with intellectual disability around
respectful relationships.
Partnered with Sports Community Inc. to
organise a forum to explore how traditional
male dominated sport clubs and associations
could increase women participation in sports.
Partnered with Kangna Indian Women’s
Network to run Creating Happy Healthy Family
Relationships workshops at both Cairnlea and
Sydenham neighbourhood houses.
Implemented the
Cairnlea Yarn Storm Against
Family Violence
project that aims to use art
to raise awareness and initiate discussion
about preventing family violence and
providing information regarding support
services.
Supported the implementation of the
Girl Talk, Guy Talk
project aimed to increase
knowledge of sexual health and healthy
relationships to young people with disability.
Supported secondary school students in
Brimbank to understand the underlying
causes of gender-based violence and how
to contribute to the prevention of violence
against women.
In partnership with cohealth, implemented
the
Baby Makes 3
parenting program to
increase the capacity of first-time parents
to build equal and respectful relationships
in response to the lifestyle and relationship
changes that follow the birth of a child.
In partnership with Playgroup Victoria,
implemented the CALD playgroup leader
training program aimed to empower
women to successfully run a playgroup.
Worked towards regional planning for
increasing female participation in sport in
partnership with Women’s Health West,
Victoria University, Melton, Wyndham,
Maribyrnong, Moonee Valley and Hobsons
Bay councils.
Updated the library membership procedures
to allow customers who identify as
transgender to identify as such in the
library’s membership database.
Distributed over 2000 men’s and
women’s Family Violence Help Cards
at community events.
Worked with partners to conduct initiatives
to raise awareness about violence against
women during the White Ribbon Day and the
16 days of activism against gender violence.
Other staff matters
A summary of the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff categorised by employment classification (band) and gender is set out below.
Status
Gender
CEO &
Councillors
City
Development
Community
Wellbeing
Corporate &
Community
Relations
Infrastructure
& Environment Total
Casual
Female
0
3
17
0
0
20
Male
0
3
6
1
0
11
Full-Time
Female
1
28
101
52
21
202
Male
1
35
40
25
245
345
Part-Time
Female
0
12
166
15
10
204
Male
1
13
26
1
4
45
Total
3
94
356
95
280
827
Note:
Casuals recorded as .04 of FTE. Council has 231 casuals that are contracted to five hours per week, which brings FTE for casuals down.
A summary of the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) Council staff by organisational structure, employment type and gender is set out below.
Employment Classification
Female FTE
Male FTE
Total FTE
Band 1
32
23
55
Band 2
31
10
41
Band 3
27
10
37
Band 4
63
69
132
Band 5
95
125
219
Band 6
71
62
133
Band 7
51
49
100
Band 8
43
37
79
Other
14
17
30
Total
426
401
827
Brimbank has an internal e-learning Equal
Opportunity (EO) training program that focuses
on the policies and procedures relating to EO.
In addition, field-based employees who do
not have access to a computer receive formal
classroom training on EO. For both platforms,
employees are required to complete an
assessment in addition to signing a statement
of attestation. Brimbank has benchmarked
that employees are required to receive EO
training every two-three years. Online training
was launched to existing staff with PC access
in March 2014; field-based staff was trained
in July 2014; formal training is scheduled for
early 2017.
Council promotes equity and diversity outcomes
to ensure an inclusive workplace culture and EO,
and recognises the importance of equity and
diversity and optimises our service design and
delivery to the broader community.
The Brimbank Leadership Essentials Program
includes a module on Diversity @ Work. In this
program the focus is on unconscious bias,
gender, diversity and inclusion, inter-cultural
communication, disability awareness and
inter-generational awareness. This module
is also made available more broadly to all
staff via the corporate training calendar.
Workforce profile (continued)
Equal Opportunity
02
Our People |
Workforce profile
|
Equal Opportunity
|
Other staff matters

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• Emotional Intelligence
• Business Writing Skills
• Diversity @ Work
• Team Management Profiling
• Aggression & Negotiation Skills
Council recognises the importance of all new
staff receiving a comprehensive induction
to Council on commencement, ensuring
they understand:
• Council functions, processes and policies
• The requirements of their role and
the functions of the directorate where
they work
• The policies and procedures that apply
to their behaviour and performance in
the workplace.
To assist with this, all staff must complete
a three-step Brimbank Induction Program.
This includes the commencement kit
provided with the letter of offer, the first
day departmental induction checklist
and attendance to Brimbank’s formal
corporate induction.
As part of the on boarding process, new
employees were given access to ‘Welcome
to Brimbank’ — an interactive program designed
to provide newly recruited employees with
information on Brimbank City Council, our
Community First culture and the benefits
of working at Brimbank.
The formal, one-day Corporate Induction
Program continued to run on a bi-monthly basis
and was revamped to ensure a more interactive,
informative and engaging session to formally
welcome new employees to Council.
The corporate induction, coupled with
Council’s eLearning modules, aim to pass on
vital information to new employees as well
as meet statutory compliance obligations.
Leadership Essentials
The Brimbank Leadership Essentials program
is targeted at new or aspirational leaders,
and has been designed to have an immediate
impact on individuals as it brings theory and
work related experience together. It is practical,
contemporary and focuses on both personal
and professional development.
The program looks at the real issues occurring
in the workplace and assists participants
in discovering relevant solutions to these
issues. The program confirms the need for
a professional and productive workplace
and aims to provide ways to create a more
positive culture. It also assists participants in
establishing strategies for the implementation
of their learning back into their workplaces.
The program provides an opportunity to gain
in-depth knowledge of business functions
and build foundational skills to integrate these
functions into the organisation, examine new
techniques and technologies for driving results,
identifying problems and formulating solutions,
and adapting to change and expand capacity
to lead cross-functional initiatives.
The program has been aligned so that upon
completion, participating staff gain a Diploma
of Leadership Management through Victoria
University. Base units are facilitated formally
and core electives are completed using
Recognition of Prior Learning.
Upon commencement of the program in March
2014, 63 employees have completed the
program and 62 employees have successfully
obtained the Diploma of Management. The
Leadership Essentials Program has undergone
a realignment to adhere to new government
standards and will recommence in the first
quarter of 2017, specifically targeted at
coordinators within the organisation.
Key performance indicators and workers’ compensation
Year
Lost time
injuries
WorkCover
claims
Days lost due to
workplace injuries
2015-2016
15
27
1,443
2014-2015
21
34
986
2013-2014
24
37
973
2012-2013
18
30
1,568
2011-2012
31
46
1,346
2010-2011
21
34
1,302
2009-2010
28
53
1,481
2008-2009
25
36
1,942
Days lost by division
City Development
243 days
Community Wellbeing
289 days
Infrastructure & Environment
911 days
Corporate & Community Relations
0 days
Total days lost
1,443 days
Learning and development
Employee development is a key focus for
Council, with a suite of programs offered
across the organisation to meet behavioural,
technical and compliance obligations as well
as enhance the knowledge, skill, experience
and competency of our employees.
Development is delivered formally, self-paced
or via Brimbank’s own e-learning tool bTrain.
Modules are made available to staff to learn
at their own pace, at their convenience.
Modules on bTrain include Equal Opportunity,
Fraud and Corruption Awareness, Code of
Conduct and TRIM – Council’s Information
Management system.
A total of 52 corporate training calendar
courses were coordinated in 2015-2016 with
127 sessions and a total of 1548 participants.
Learning programs offered took
into consideration departmental,
interpersonal and organisational needs
to help employees meet Council’s objectives.
Some of the key programs included:
• Front Line Adaptive Communication
• Presentation Skills – Return of Councillors
• Microsoft Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint)
• Communicating with Others
• Corporate Induction
• Equal Opportunity
• Fraud Corruption & Awareness
• Code of Conduct
• iPad For Business
• Project Management
• Contract Management
• Effective Time Management
• Occupational Health and Safety (OHS)
The total number of days lost is made up of the following:
• New claims in the reporting period 2015-2016
• Days lost to existing claims
Council continued with its early intervention Return to Work initiatives of onsite physiotherapy
consultancy, off-site physiotherapy treatment, and working closely with managers to facilitate
immediate return to work programs.
Other staff matters (continued)
Occupational Health and Safety (OHS)
Council is committed to a positive and safe
work culture and the 2016 year has seen
significant changes in the OHS function.
The team continues to strive for continuous
improvement with a focus on several
areas which include the OHS Management
System (OHSMS), training, governance
and strategic planning.
In November 2015, a three-year strategic
OHS plan was drafted to set out Council’s long
term objectives for safety and wellbeing. The
strategic direction for OHS was organised to
deliver safe, precise, predictable outcomes that
our stakeholders and the community demand.
The plan is organised around the seven key
principles that provide the foundation for
bSafe, namely Leadership, Accountability,
Hazard Management, Safe Systems of Work,
Knowledge & Communication, Health &
Well Being and Monitoring & Review. These
principles were translated into our prime
strategic objectives supporting Council’s
safety, health and wellbeing vision.
02
Our People |
Other staff matters

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• A Council Plan within the six months
after each general election or by 30 June,
whichever is later
• A Strategic Resource Plan for a period
of at least four years and include this
in the Council Plan
• A Budget for each financial year
• An Annual Report in respect
of each financial year.
The following diagram shows the relationships
between the key planning and reporting
documents that make up the planning and
accountability framework for Local Government.
It also shows that there are opportunities for
community and stakeholder input and feedback
at each stage of the planning and reporting cycle.
Brimbank’s integrated planning framework
ensures that strategic and financial resources
are aligned in order to deliver the Council Plan.
Engaging with and consulting the community
is a vital element of this process.
Planning and Accountability Framework
Brimbank Community Plan
The
Brimbank Community Plan 2009-2030
(updated 2013) describes the community’s
vision and long-term priorities for the next 20
years and establishes a shared basis for joint
planning, service delivery and advocacy.
The plan has been shaped by a community
consultation process that explored the
community’s understanding of the strengths
within the community and the opportunities
for improvement, and came up with a vision for
the future.
The Community Plan was first endorsed by
Council in 2009. The Community Plan is Council’s
primary planning document and all other Council
plans and activities relate to this document.
Council Budget
The Annual Budget documents the financial
resources required to implement the key
activities identified in the Council Plan that
will be undertaken in order to achieve Council’s
strategic objectives.
Community engagement
and consultation
The community’s involvement in planning
and policy development, service delivery and
advocacy is supported by increasing community
awareness and education and opportunities
for community members to be consulted and
involved in all aspects of community life. The
information gathered is also used to develop the
strategies and commitments in the Council Plan.
Council Plan
The Council Plan is one of Brimbank’s primary
strategic documents. It is directly aligned to
the Community Plan and provides a four-year
medium-term outlook while the Community
Plan contains the long-term aspirations of
the community. The Council Plan informs the
development of Council’s Annual Plan and Budget.
The
Council Plan 2013-2017
(updated 2015)
outlines Council’s strategic directions and
focus for the next four years. It also details
the objectives and key actions that are to be
completed over the financial year in order to
achieve these directions, as well as measures to
monitor performance in delivering services to
the community and fulfill Council’s commitment
to ongoing improvement.
It is the 2015-2016 performance that is
reported in this Annual Report.
The
Council Plan 2013-2017
includes strategic
objectives, strategies for achieving these
for the four-year period, strategic indicators
for monitoring achievement of the strategic
objectives and a strategic resource plan.
The
Local Government Act 1989
requires councils to prepare the following planning and reporting documents:
Time horizon
Medium term
Short term
Planning
Reporting
Timing
Council plan
• Strategic objectives
• Strategies
• Strategic indicators
Stakeholder
and
community
engagement
Annual report
• Report of
operations
• Financial
statements
• Performance
statement
Strategic resource plan
• Financial statements
• Statements of
non-financial resources
Budget
• Services and initiatives
• Service outcome indicators
• Major initiatives
• Financial statements
Jan – Jun
Feb – Jun
Mar – Jun
Jul – Sep
03
Our
performance
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03
Our Performance |
Planning and Accountability Framework
Year End
Accountability
Audited Statements
30 years +
Long Term Planning
{
Community Plan
Medium Term Planning
and Sustainability
4 years
{
Council Plan
12 months
Short Term Planning
{
Budget
{
Community vision, Mission, Values,
Long term financial plan, Asset management plan
Strategic objectives, Strategies, Strategic indicators,
Strategic resource plan, (incl, Standard statements)
Standard statements, Activities & initiatives,
Key strategic activities, Other information
Standard statements, Financial statements,
Performance statement
Brimbank’s planning framework

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Brimbank City Council is committed
to promoting the long-term sustainable
development of the municipality
Brimbank City Council is committed to the
ongoing delivery of a broad range of services
that meet the needs and aspirations of the
diverse and growing Brimbank community
Brimbank City Council is committed
to providing local employment and business
development opportunities whilst also ensuring
that such activities do not have a detrimental
impact on local communities
Brimbank City Council
is committed to working in close
collaboration with the community
04
Sustainable
environments
06
Organisational
effectiveness
05
Industry and
economic development
and strategic sites
01
Council and the
community working
together
Council Plan Strategic Objectives
Council will do this by facilitating a dynamic and accessible environment that is supported by a healthy and informed community that enjoys rich
environmental characteristics within the municipality. Council is committed to environmental protection, planning for sustainable developments,
improving the sustainability of our building stock, and reducing our ecological footprint.
• Reducing the city’s ecological footprint
• Protecting and enhancing our natural environment
• Fostering sustainable urban development.
Guided by the Australian Business Excellence Framework, the ongoing development of our staff is a critical element to our continuous
improvement of service delivery. We will continue to benchmark services to ensure best practice, lead by example, and implement best practice
services to the community.
• Developing our people
• Creating a high performance organisation through continuous improvement.
Brimbank City Council is committed
to creating an enhanced quality of
healthy and active community life
02
Community
wellbeing
Our rich cultures are celebrated, embraced and connected to the broader community. Within a strong foundation of social justice,
Council is committed to the provision of affordable services and community infrastructure that builds healthy people and communities
through education, recreation, arts and culture and sport.
• Creating connected, supported and welcoming communities
• Celebrating our history, creativity and diversity
• Creating healthy, safe communities
• Creating a community of lifelong learners
• Building economically sustainable communities.
Brimbank City Council
is committed to fostering strong
pride for residents and visitors
03
Urban design and
infrastructure
Council creates an urban environment that is attractive, clean and green and which improves living and housing, business and recreational
opportunities, demonstrates environmental leadership and fosters a sustainable economy. Council is also committed to developing its five
town centres and its many smaller urban villages across the municipality, as a network of safe, attractive, vibrant, livable and prosperous
places that provide accessible retail, business, community, social activities, employment and residential opportunities.
• Contributing to an accessible, connected city
• Enhancing the character and identity of our city
• Providing a range of places for people to play, relax and meet
• Ensuring that there are sustainable plans for the management of Brimbank’s physical assets.
The municipality contains a range of strategic sites (outside of town centres or urban villages) that, due to their location, size, environment or
current or past use, can greatly assist Council to achieve its economic, social or environmental objectives.
• Promoting and advocating for appropriate recognition, development and use of Brimbank’s strategic sites
• Increasing local employment, business, office and economic development
• Facilitating future industrial, commercial or residential development at strategic sites.
Council facilitates a wide cross-section of community participation, including ‘hard to reach’ groups, through a variety of forums and partnerships
to better engage, develop, represent, and communicate with our diverse community. Brimbank City Council will fulfil its statutory and legal
obligations to the community and manage the municipality in a financially sustainable manner to meet the current needs of our community
and those of future generations.
• Developing leadership in the community
• Governing responsibly and community advocacy
• Keeping the community informed and involved
• Working in partnership
• Responsible financial management.
03
Our Performance |
Council Plan Strategic Objectives

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Strategic Objective 1:
Council and the community working together
Strategic indicator / measure
Result
Comments
Developing leadership in the community
Actively promote the roles and skills of Community
Resource Members across relevant Council work
areas to ensure their participation in local projects.
41
The number of people trained as leaders and
participating in projects was lower than in 2014/15.
Governing responsibly and community advocacy
Resident perception of Council performance
on lobbying on the behalf of the community.
57
This is three points higher than 2014/15
and four points higher than the state average.
Resident perception that Council is generally
heading in the right direction.
61
This is four points higher than 2014/15
and 10 points higher than the state average.
Keeping the community informed and involved
Resident perception of Council performance
on community consultation and engagement.
54
This is four points lower than 2014/15
and equal to the state average.
Resident perception of Council performance
on informing the community.
58
This is three points lower than 2014/15
and the same as the state average.
Working in partnership
Number of meetings with the Sunshine, Sydenham
and St Albans Town Centre Partnership Groups.
7
There have been seven meetings with the Sunshine
and St Albans Town Centre Partnership Groups.
Council resolved to dissolve Sydenham Partnership Group.
Responsible financial management
Debt servicing ratio.
1.15%
Target achieved.
Adjusted Working Capital Ratio.
197.54%
Target achieved.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Council’s performance for the 2015-2016 year has been reported against each strategic objective
to demonstrate how Council is performing in achieving the
Council Plan 2013-2017
.
Performance has been measured as follows:
• Results achieved in relation to the strategic indicators in the Council Plan
• Progress in relation to the major initiatives identified in the Budget
• Services funded in the Budget and the persons or sections of the community who are provided those services
• Results against the prescribed service performance indicators and measures.
Performance
Major initiatives
Progress
Deliver Council’s Community Governance training program to community groups,
small not-for-profit organisations and interested individuals across Brimbank to
support good governance practice in community organisations.
Council delivered 19 Community Governance Training
sessions in 2015/16, with 400 participants in total.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2015-2016 Budget for the year.
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
Governance
Responsible for:
• Providing support for the Council operations, both statutory and ceremonial
• Providing administration and meeting support such as agendas and minutes
• Enforcing legislation compliance
• Managing and investigating complaints relating to statutory breaches
• Coordinating proposals for place and street name changes
• Providing some forms of risk management and legal advice
• Overseeing internal risk and control regime
• Conducting internal fraud and risk management audits in accordance with annual plan
• Managing insurance premiums and claims
• Undertaking business continuity planning and reviews.
5,037 5,339 302
Community
Information
Responsible for:
• Undertaking media liaison
• Producing Council’s corporate publications including writing, editing and graphic design
• Developing, coordinating, and advising on Council’s communication and consultation
strategies and direction
• Managing and updating Council’s website and social media
• Coordinating advertising
• Speech writing
• Keeping the community informed, and promoting Brimbank.
2,498 2,307 (191)
Financial
Services
Responsible for:
• Providing a fully integrated financial service across Council
• Preparing annual financial statements and other statutory returns
• Supporting service units with financial analysis of their business to help support decisions
• Paying suppliers
• Monitoring Council’s cash and investments to maximise interest earnings
• Ensuring compliance with legislation, industry awards and accounting standards.
2,541 2,497 (44)
Procurement
and Tendering
Responsible for:
• Providing a centralised tendering coordination function
• Providing centralised management of the procurement policy and procedures
• Providing training and system administration for Council’s procurement systems/software
• Assisting with procurement matters across all service units
• Managing Council’s procurement procedures and processes
• Providing governance around procurement and tendering processes.
1,189 1,553 364
Revenue and Process
Management
Responsible for:
• Valuing all properties within the municipality
• Raising, and collecting, annual rates and charges
• Managing Council’s policies and procedures system.
2,309 2,311 2
Customer Relations
A professional customer focused service through call centres and front desks
(face-to-face interactions).
Responsible for:
• Following up on customer requests
• Providing statistical information to the organisation
• Undertaking call backs to residents who have received a direct service.
3,779 3,894 115
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2015-2016 Budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are providing the service.
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Strategic Objective 1: Council and the community working together

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Service / indicator / measure
Results
Material variations
2015
2016
Governance
Transparency
Council decisions made at meetings closed to the public
[Number of Council resolutions made at ordinary or special meetings
of Council, or at meetings of a special committee consisting only of
Councillors, closed to the public/number of Council resolutions made
at ordinary or special meetings of Council or at meetings of a special
committee consisting only of Councillors] x100
0.63%
0.34%
No material variations
Consultation and engagement
Satisfaction with community consultation and engagement
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how Council
has performed on community consultation and engagement]
58
54
No material variations
Attendance
Councillor attendance at council meetings
[The sum of the number of Councillors who attended each ordinary
and special Council meeting/(number of ordinary and special Council
meetings) × (number of Councillors elected at the last Council general
election)] x100
94.20%
93.65%
No material variations
Service cost
Cost of governance
[Direct cost of the governance service/number of Councillors
elected at the last Council general election]
$161,679.00 $172,219.55
This indicator was clarified
for the 2015/2016 year to
include all costs related to the
recruitment and performance
of the Chief Executive
Officer. In accordance with
best practice, independent
consultants were engaged
to support the council in
these processes. A new
Chief Executive Officer was
recruited in September and
commenced in October 2015.
Satisfaction
Satisfaction with Council decisions
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how Council has
performed in making decisions in the interest of the community]
55
57
No material variations
The following statement provides the results of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation
of material variations.
Strategic Objective 2:
Community wellbeing
Strategic indicator / measure
Result
Comments
Creating connected, supported
and welcoming communities
Resident perception about Council’s
general town planning policy.
56
This is three points below 2014/15 and three points below target.
Celebrating our history, creativity and diversity
Resident perception about Council performance
on community and cultural activities.
67
Target achieved and two points above 2014/15.
Creating a community of lifelong learners
Resident perception about Council
performance on art centres and libraries.
68
This is one point below 2014/15 and one point below target.
Building economically sustainable communities
Resident perception about Council performance
on business and community development and tourism.
57
This is two points below 2014/15 and on target.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Major initiatives
Progress
Develop a new Brimbank Community and
Civic Centre in Sunshine including a new library.
The Brimbank Community and Civic Centre and Library
construction has proceeded and the new facility will
open to the community in July 2016.
Start construction of the St Albans Community Centre.
The St Albans Community Centre is scheduled for
completion in late 2016.
Conduct Community Leadership Training.
Forty one people were provided community
leadership training.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2015-2016 budget for the year.
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Strategic Objective 2: Community wellbeing

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Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
Community
Planning and
Development
The Community Planning and Development Department is responsible for the following
key service areas:
Arts and Culture
• Developing and delivering arts short courses, exhibition programs and artists’ studios to
support creativity in Brimbank
• Maintaining and expanding the indoor art collection and public art to increase vibrancy in local
areas and public spaces
• Facilitating festivals and events that increase celebrations of Council’s diversity and heritage.
Community Development
• Supporting community development through leadership programs and grants
• Facilitating volunteer opportunities
• Managing and assisting with strategic planning and promotion of the neighbourhood houses in
Cairnlea, Delahey, Sydenham, West Sunshine and St Albans.
Community Planning
Supporting community planning through population and data analysis, effective research
and evaluation, the implementation and review of the Community Plan, Council Plan and action
plans to support cultural diversity and reconciliation.
Social and Health Policy
Supporting the development of a socially just and healthy community through the
implementation of a Social Justice Charter, Social Justice Coalition and policy development
such as language services, housing, gambling, family violence, etc.
6,819 7,797 978
Community
Care
Key service areas to support community wellbeing include:
Ageing and Inclusion
Providing a range of services to support, maintain and enhance the physical,
social and emotional wellbeing of its clients, including:
• Home care – which includes personal, home care, property maintenance / garden care,
planned activity groups, respite care and delivered meals
• Community transport – seniors’ support which includes the implementation
of the community register and volunteer coordination.
Families and Early Years
Oversees the delivery of a range of early childhood and family services:
• Children’s Services and Family Services.
Council undertakes and facilitates planning and development of early childhood
opportunities that benefit the health and wellbeing of children and families in Brimbank.
Council also provides support to playgroups, preschools and child care services
throughout the municipality.
• Maternal Child Health
Council provides a universal primary care service for families with children aged from
birth to school age. The service also provides intensive support for vulnerable families
experiencing significant parenting difficulties.
• Pre School Services
Seeks to further children’s social, emotional, physical and intellectual development
in the year before they start primary school.
Youth Services
Provides services that are aimed at strengthening, protecting and building resilience
in young people so that they face the challenges of adolescence and adulthood.
11,944 12,708 764
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
Library
Services
Libraries and learning includes:
• Providing programs and opportunities that support a reading culture including early years
learning, school years, skills for employment, digital literacy, social connectedness and English
literacy skills
• Providing access to quality collections, computers and the internet
• Providing a quiet place for study and recreation
• Offering information and assistance through library staff
• Offering access to online resources, services and programs via the library website.
7,200 7,331 131
Leisure
Services
Leisure Services is responsible for four key areas:
Sport and Recreation
• Managing seasonal and casual allocation of grounds, and actively works
with clubs and community members
• Supporting clubs through training and other capacity building programs.
Community Facilities
• Managing administration requirements, including bookings of community facilities,
and supporting the groups using those facilities
• Planning and delivering community infrastructure required to strengthen local communities
(for example community hubs, and sporting and recreation facilities).
Leisure Planning & Policy
• Undertaking research and consultation to plan for the development of sport and recreation
projects throughout the municipality
• Providing information on needs, and recommending priorities for future capital works.
Leisure Facilities
Managing Council’s four leisure facilities, including:
1. Keilor Basketball and Netball Stadium
2. St Albans Leisure Centre
3. Sunshine Leisure Centre
4. Keilor Golf Course
Leisure Centres
Council has four leisure facilities:
1. The Keilor Basketball and Netball Stadium
2. Keilor Golf Course
3. St Albans Leisure Centre
4. Sunshine Leisure Centre
These facilities provide affordable opportunities for residents and others
to engage in healthy physical activity of fitness, sport and social activities.
4,735 5,059 324
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2015-2016 Budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are providing the service.
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Strategic Objective 2: Community wellbeing

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Service / indicator / measure
Result
Material variations
2015
2016
Aquatic Facilities
Service standard
Health inspections of aquatic facilities
[Number of authorised officer inspections of Council
aquatic facilities/number of Council aquatic facilities]
4.00
4.00
No material variations
Service standard
Reportable safety incidents at aquatic facilities
[Number of WorkSafe reportable aquatic facility safety incidents]
0
0
No material variations
Service cost
Cost of indoor aquatic facilities
[Direct cost of indoor aquatic facilities less income
received/number of visits to indoor aquatic facilities]
$4.83
$3.86
No material variations
Utilisation
Utilisation of aquatic facilities
[Number of visits to aquatic facilities/ municipal population]
2.78
2.85
No material variations
Home and Community Care
Timeliness
Time taken to commence the HACC service
[Number of days between the referral of a new client
and commencement of HACC service/number of new
clients who have received a HACC service]
NA
13.57 days
No material variations
Service standard
Compliance with Community Care Common Standards
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how Council
has performed on community consultation and engagement]
100.00%
100.00%
No material variations
Service cost
Cost of domestic care service
[Cost of the domestic care service/hours
of domestic care service delivered]
Cost of personal care service
[Cost of the personal care service/hours
of personal care service delivered]
Cost of respite care service
[Cost of the respite care service/hours
of respite care service delivered]
NA
NA
NA
$56.08
$56.08
$56.08
No material variations
No material variations
No material variations
Participation
Participation in HACC service
[Number of people that received a HACC service/municipal
target population for HACC services] x100
Participation in HACC service by Culturally
and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) people
[Number of CALD people who receive a HACC service/municipal
target population in relation to CALD people for HACC services] x100
5.87%*
5.33%*
5.41%
4.95%
Growth in target population
has increased at a higher rate
than services provided.
Growth in target population
has increased at a higher rate
than services provided.
The following statement provides the results of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation
of material variations.
Service / indicator / measure
Result
Material variations
2015
2016
Libraries
Utilisation
Library collection usage
[Number of library collection item loans / number
of library collection items]
4.96
5.59
This year there was a change
in the measurement of library
collection usage to include the
loan of electronic resources
and this has had an effect on
the year end result.
Resource standard
Standard of library collection
[Number of library collection items purchased in the last
5 years/number of library collection items] x100
73.60%
69.43%
No material variations
Service cost
Cost of library service
[Direct cost of the library service/number of visits]
$5.91
$6.39
No material variations
Participation
Active library members
[Number of active library members/municipal population] x100
16.54%
14.07%
No material variations
Maternal and Child Health (MCH)
Satisfaction
Participation in first MCH home visit
[Number of first MCH home visits/number
of birth notifications received] x100
100.30%
107.06%
No material variations
Service standard
Infant enrollments in MCH service
[Number of infants enrolled in the MCH service (from birth
notifications received)/number of birth notifications received] x100
94.20%
100.00%
No material variations
Cost of the MCH service
[Cost of the MCH service/hours worked by MCH nurses]
NA
$83.69
No material variations
Participation
Participation in the MCH service
[Number of children who attend the MCH service at least once
(in the year)/number of children enrolled in the MCH service] x100
72.46%
72.90%
No material variations
Participation in MCH service by Aboriginal children
[Number of Aboriginal children who attend the MCH service at
least once (in the year)/number of Aboriginal children enrolled in
the MCH service] x100
68.29%
53.76%
The level of participation
in Key Age Stage visits has
decreased during the period.
* This data has been incorrectly reported in the accompanying Performance Statement as follows: Participation in HACC Service - reported as 12.81%. Participation in HACC
Service by CALD people - reported as 12.20%. Actual results as above. Error was identified post Performance Statement audit.
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Strategic Objective 2: Community wellbeing

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Strategic Objective 3:
Urban design and infrastructure
Strategic indicator / measure
Result
Comments
Enhancing the character and identity of our city
Resident perception of Council performance around
condition of local streets and footpaths.
54
This is two points higher than 2014/15 and one point below target.
Resident perception of Council performance
on the appearance of public areas.
61
This is one point below 2014/15 and two points above target.
Providing a range of places for people to play,
relax and meet
Resident perception of Council’s performance
on recreational facilities.
63
This is three points below 2014/15 and two points below target.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Major initiatives
Progress
Implement the Road Asset Management Plan through the delivery
of a $16.9 million road rehabilitation and upgrade program.
The road rehabilitation and upgrade was delivered to a 93%
completion rate within the 2015/16 capital works program.
Completion is expected by August 2016.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2015-2016 budget for the year.
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
Engineering
Services
The Engineering Services Department is responsible for the following services:
Asset Management
• Developing and implementing Road Asset Management Plan
• Developing and implementing Stormwater Asset Management Plan
• Footpath maintenance program and inspections
• Construction management of capital works footpath and kerb.
Strategic Engineering
• Coordinating capital works planning and delivery
• Pavement management system coordination
• Transport planning
• Strategic capital planning
• Traffic management
• Infrastructure development
• Subdivision approvals
• Project services.
8,144 8,088 (56)
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
Environment
Responsible for:
• Ensuring Brimbank’s environment has a strategic direction, and is responsive
to changing needs while focusing on long-term sustainability
• Providing leadership, education, coordination and project management
• Engaging the community in the conservation, management and restoration
of Brimbank’s natural areas, including grasslands, waterways and rocky escarpments.
2,748 2,572 (176)
Operations
Operations centre management and administration oversee the following services:
Building Maintenance
• Delivers programmed and response maintenance and minor upgrades of municipal
buildings, toilets and facilities throughout the municipality, including mechanical
equipment and pest control
• Undertakes programmed and response maintenance of playgrounds, street furniture,
flags and banners, park furniture and fencing
• Graffiti removal
• Supervises Council’s security contract and cleaning contract for numerous sites.
Fleet Services
Manages services and maintains Council’s entire fleet, including leased and Council-owned
vehicles, plant and equipment.
Parks Services
Maintains parks, street trees, sportsgrounds, streetscapes, grounds of Council-owned
facilities and the Keilor Golf Course.
Roads and Cleansing
Maintains Council’s road and drainage network and associated infrastructure in accordance
with Council’s Road Asset Management Plan. Responsible for the overall cleanliness and safety
of Council land.
Waste Services
Manages kerbside refuse, recycling and green waste collections, Council’s Detox
Your Home Facility and annual hard waste collections.
61,643 62,877 1,234
Urban
Design
Responsible for:
• Improving the appearance of the municipality through the delivery of capital works projects,
design advice, development facilitation and policy creation
• Advocating for good design outcomes with private developers, government departments
and other areas within Council, and by lobbying for State Government and other funding.
1,573 2,127 554
Asset
Services
Provides a range of assets, geographical (GIS) and demographic information asset management
services that support both strategic and operational decision-making to improve evidence-based
planning and operational performance across the organisation.
1,267 1,427 160
Building
Services
Responsible for:
• Administering and enforcing the
Building Act
and
Planning and Environment Act
• Issuing and inspecting building permits for new work.
1,519 1,273 246
Property
Services
Responsible for:
• Providing strategic advice on Council’s property portfolio
• Managing the Facilities Asset Management Plan
• Developing lease documentation and managing lease negotiations
• Managing the capital works program.
2,238 2,267 29
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2015-2016 budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are providing the service.
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Strategic Objective 3: Urban design and infrastructure

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Service / indicator / measure
Result
Material variations
2015
2016
Roads
Satisfaction
Sealed local road requests
[Number of sealed local road requests/kilometres of sealed local roads]
x100
56.29
42.62
Council has revised its
interpretation of ‘local road’ to
include collector and arterial
roads where we are the
responsible road authority.
This amendment has resulted
in larger than expected
change for this measure.
Condition
Sealed local roads below the intervention level
[Number of kilometres of sealed local roads below the renewal
intervention level set by Council/kilometres of sealed local roads] x100
89.63%
81.91%
No material variations
Service cost
Cost of sealed local road reconstruction
[Direct cost of sealed local road reconstruction/square metres
of sealed local roads reconstructed]
$206.04
$85.83
A review of the road
components relevant to
calculating the cost for this
service measure indicates the
cost of those components
should not be included. Based
on this revised methodology
for calculating relevant costs,
the 2015 results should have
been $94.66. The lower cost
result for 2016 is indicative
of more competitive market
conditions in the road
construction industry.
Service cost
Cost of sealed local road resealing
[Direct cost of sealed local road resealing/square
metres of sealed local roads resealed]
$28.91
$25.29
Brimbank City Council
undertakes all road resealing
works via contracts, which
are awarded following a
competitive public tender
process. The lower cost
result for 2016 is indicative
of more competitive market
conditions in the road
construction industry.
Satisfaction
Satisfaction with sealed local roads
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how Council
has performed on the condition of sealed local roads]
60.00
58.00
No material variations
The following statement provides the results of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation
of material variations.
Service / indicator / measure
Result
Material variations
2015
2016
Waste Collection
Satisfaction
Kerbside bin collection requests
[Number of kerbside garbage and recycling bin collection
requests/number of kerbside bin collection households] x1000
239.86
202.62
There was a significant
reduction in requests for
the service this financial
year. In the previous year
industrial action resulted in a
higher than usual number of
requests.
Quality
Service standard
Kerbside collection bins missed
[Number of kerbside garbage and recycling collection bins missed
/ number of scheduled kerbside garbage and recycling collection bin lifts]
x10,000
12.16
10.62
No material variations
Service cost
Cost of kerbside garbage bin collection service
[Direct cost of the kerbside garbage bin collection
service/number of kerbside garbage collection bins]
$104.18
$106.17
No material variations
Service cost
Cost of kerbside recyclables bin collection service
[Direct cost of the kerbside recyclables bin collection
service/number of kerbside recyclables collection bins]
$29.05
$11.54
There was a significant
reduction in cost for the
service this financial year due
to an increase in the rebate
for recyclable material
provided by our processing
contractor.
Waste diversion
Kerbside collection waste diverted from landfill
[Weight of recyclables and green organics collected from kerbside
bins/weight of garbage, recyclables and green organics collected
from kerbside bins] x100
37.98%
38.80%
No material variations
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Strategic Objective 3: Urban design and infrastructure

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Strategic Objective 4:
Sustainable environments
Strategic indicator / measure
Result
Comments
Reducing the city’s ecological footprint
Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Council operations.
7%
At 7% below 2011 baseline figure and trending in a positive
direction.
Protecting and enhancing our natural environment
Resident perception of Council performance
on environmental sustainability.
57
This is four points lower than 2014/15 and seven points
below target.
Fostering sustainable urban development
Resident perception of Council performance
on planning and population growth in the area.
55
This is two points lower than 2014/15 and three points
below target.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Major initiatives
Progress
Pursue implementation of the Sunshine Town Centre Structure Plan,
St Albans Structure Plan and Keilor Village Vision.
Sunshine Town Centre Structure Plan and the Keilor Village
Vision are complete. The St Albans Structure Plan is awaiting
Council consideration.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2015-2016 budget for the year.
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
City
Planning
Responsible for:
• Providing statutory planning services to Council, the community and the development industry
• Administering the Brimbank Planning Scheme
• Assessing planning permit applications for land use, development and subdivision
• Representing Council at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal
• Responding to property information requests and provision of planning information.
44 970 926
City
Compliance
Responsible for:
• Education and enforcement of relevant legislation, local laws and Council policies
including public health, animal management and littering
• Regulating and controlling activities that may be unsafe, a nuisance or detrimental
to the peace and quality of life.
Local Laws
• Enforcing parking regulations under State Laws (Victorian Road Rules)
• Ensuring Council’s local laws are complied with
• Promoting responsible pet ownership
• Providing a safe environment around school crossings.
Environmental Health Services
• Reducing the incidence of food borne disease by ensuring food sold, prepared,
manufactured, stored and transported in the municipality is safe for human consumption
• Providing an immunisation program to reduce preventable diseases
• Minimising public health risks from environmental hazards
• Implementing infectious diseases programs to identify and take preventative
measures to minimise the risk of infectious disease outbreaks
• Enforcing the
Tobacco Act
requirements including the sale of cigarette to minors
• Providing a needle disposal program and providing advice about handling sharps.
2,672 2,979 307
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2015-2016 budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are provided the service.
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Strategic Objective 4: Sustainable environments

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Service / indicator / measure
Result
Material variations
2015
2016
Statutory Planning
Timeliness
Time taken to decide planning applications
[The median number of days between receipt of a planning
application and a decision on the application]
92.00
112.00
Throughout 2015/2016,
Brimbank City Council
has experienced an
increase in the complexity
of planning permit
applications, and
implemented changes
with the introduction of a
significant digitisation process.
Service standard
Planning applications decided within 60 days
[Number of planning application decisions made within 60
days/number of planning application decisions made] x100
65.00%
55.00%
Throughout 2015/2016,
Brimbank City Council
has experienced an
increase in the complexity
of planning permit
applications, and
implemented changes with the
introduction of a significant
digitisation process.
Service cost
Cost of statutory planning service
[Direct cost of the statutory planning service/number
of planning applications received]
$1,868.98
$2,133.94
The increasing number
and complexity of applications
has increased some costs
related to expert advice and
legal review.
Decision making
Planning decisions upheld at VCAT
[Number of VCAT decisions that did not set aside Council’s
decision in relation to a planning application/number
of VCAT decisions in relation to planning applications] x100
71.43%
80.95%
No material variations
Service / indicator / measure
Result
Material variations
2015
2016
Animal Management
Timeliness
Time taken to action animal requests
[Number of days between receipt and first response action for all
animal management requests/number of animal management requests]
NA
1.21
No material variations
Service standard
Animals reclaimed
[Number of animals reclaimed/number of animals collected] x100
34.39%
33.53%
No material variations
Service cost
Cost of animal management service
[Direct cost of the animal management
service/number of registered animals]
$55.29
$58.80
The increase in the cost of
animal management services
is primarily due to increased
costs by the external
provider for impounding
and rehousing services.
Health and safety
Animal management prosecutions
[Number of successful animal management prosecutions]
6.00
7.00
No material variations
Food Safety
Timeliness
Time taken to action food complaints
[Number of days between receipt and first response
action for all food complaints/number of food complaints]
NA
1.40
No material variations
Service standard
Food safety assessments
[Number of registered class 1 food premises and class 2 food premises
that receive an annual food safety assessment in accordance with
the
Food Act 1984
/number of registered class 1 food premises and
class 2 food premises that require an annual food safety assessment
in accordance with the
Food Act 1984
] x100
100.00%
100.00%
No material variations
Service cost
Cost of food safety service
[Direct cost of the food safety service/number of food premises
registered or notified in accordance with the
Food Act 1984
]
$1,131.51
$257.20
The improvement in 2015-
2016 is based on an accurate
calculation of costs related
to food safety (registration,
inspection, product recalls,
public information and the
like) and excluding other
environmental health service
costs unrelated to food safety.
Health and safety
Critical and major non-compliance notifications
[Number of critical non-compliance outcome notifications and major
non-compliance notifications about a food premises followed up /
number of critical non-compliance outcome notifications and major
non-compliance notifications about a food premises] x100
100.00%
100.00%
No material variations
The following statement provides the results of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation
of material variations.
03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 4: Sustainable environments

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2015-2016
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55
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Strategic Objective 5:
Industry and economic development and strategic sites
Strategic Objective 6:
Organisational effectiveness
Strategic indicator / measure
Result
Comments
Promoting and advocating for the appropriate recognition,
development and use of Brimbank’s strategic sites
Level of website and social media presence for strategic sites.
6,611 hits Website hits related to ‘invest’ and related to strategic sites.
Increasing local employment, business,
office and economic development
Resident perception of Council performance on
business and community development and tourism.
57
This is on target but two points lower than 2014/15.
Facilitating future industrial, commercial
or residential development at strategic sites
Number of facilitation meetings held with proponents
for major industrial, commercial or residential development
projects on strategic sites.
16
There were 16 facilitation meetings with proponents for
major industrial, commercial or residential development
projects on strategic sites.
Strategic indicator / measure
Result
Comments
Developing our people
Separation of low tenure (less than one year)
employees as a percentage of total hires.
24.11%
Target achieved.
Review and improve Council’s organisational
capabilities within a best practice framework
Resident perception of Council performance
in relation to customer service.
73
This is on target and remains the same as 2014/15.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Major initiatives
Progress
Promote local tourism attractions through
local and regional networks and initiatives.
Council has maintained its membership with the Western
Melbourne Tourism (WMT), and digital subscription with
Destination Melbourne. Council has promoted Overnewton
Castle, St Albans Lunar Festival, Alice’s Playspace and the
Keilor Hotel, through social media and “Westside Stories”.
Council also distributed over 100 ‘Experience Brimbank’
brochures to key stakeholders.
Major initiatives
Progress
Extend quarterly reporting on adherence
to Customer Service Standards.
Ongoing
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2015-2016 budget for the year.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2015-2016 budget for the year.
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable/
(Unfavourable) $000
City
Strategy
Responsible for:
• Preparing and implementing long-term land use planning strategies,
including the Municipal Strategic Statement
• Preparing planning scheme amendments and reviewing the Brimbank Planning Scheme
• Economic development, investment attraction, project facilitation, and marketing
• Place management and coordinated planning for Brimbank’s town centres and urban villages
• Planning and redevelopment of ‘strategic sites’
(sites with complex environmental and infrastructure issues).
2,082 2,213 130
Service
Description
Net Cost Actual
Budget
Favourable /
(Unfavourable) $000
People and
Performance
The key responsibilities of the People and Performance department include:
• Supporting and advising Council’s management and employees on all aspects
of Human Resources and Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) management
• Leading and driving cultural change through the development and implementation
of programs such as:
• Leadership and management development
• Organisational values and behaviours
• An integrated performance management system.
• Reporting of progress against the Council Plan
• Best Value and organisational statistics
• Commencing the business transformation project.
4,707 5,482 775
Information
Management
The key objectives of the Information Management department include:
• To provide a consistently high level of information technology and information
management services to all service units and community centres, thus enabling
them to effectively manage their business processes
• To develop and implement information technology projects in line with corporate
strategic objective.
5,110 5,101 (9)
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2015-2016 budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are provided the service.
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2015-2016 budget and the persons or sections
of the community who are provided the service.
03
Our Performance |
Strategic Objective 5: Industry and economic development and strategic sites
|
Strategic Objective 6: Organisational effectiveness

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2015-2016
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Brimbank City Council derives its
power, role, purpose and functions
from the
Local Government Act 1989
.
Governance framework
Brimbank City Council’s Governance Framework
provides for the achievement of best practice
governance, as well as ensuring compliance
with the
Local Government Act 1989
.
Governance at Brimbank is defined as the
process of decision-making, and the process
by which decisions are implemented. This
translates into how Council operates as a
decision-making body, and its relationship
with the organisation (that provides advice to
Council and implements its decisions). It also
includes the ways that Council engages with its
community in this process.
Council meetings
Council makes its decisions at meetings that are
open to the public.
At
Ordinary Council Meetings
, Council
considered a range of matters, and aimed to make
decisions in relation to Council’s responsibilities
in the best interests of the community.
On 15 December 2015, the schedule for 2016
Ordinary Council Meetings for the first quarter
of 2016, comprising twice monthly meetings,
was adopted. The first meeting was held on
the second Tuesday of the month, at the Keilor
Municipal Offices. The second meeting was
held on the fourth Tuesday of the month, at the
Sunshine Municipal Offices.
On 8 March 2016, following a review of the
governance structure, Council resolved to
change to a monthly meeting cycle. This change
was in order to provide sufficient time and
opportunity for incoming Councillors, who are
often in full or part-time employment as well as
representing Council on a number of external
committees, to be provided with relevant
information to assist their decision-making.
Special Council Meetings
are convened for a
specific purpose. Only matters advertised and
listed on the agenda for the meeting may be
dealt with (except via resolution).
Council conducted two Special Council Meetings
in 2015/2016. The first was to consider and
adopt a new Councillor Code of Conduct, in
accordance with new provisions of the
Local
Government Act 1989
. The second Special
Council Meeting was called to authorise use
of Council’s seal in executing an agreement
for the Local Government Funding Vehicle,
in accordance with the
Governance (Meeting
Procedure) Local Law No. 1
.
Governance and Management
Council agenda
The business to be considered by the Council
is set out in the Council Meeting agenda. The
agenda was available on Council’s website
five days prior to a Council Meeting. Hard copy
agendas were available in Chamber on the night
of the Council Meeting, and at the Keilor, Sunshine
and Sydenham Customer Service Centres,
and at libraries, on the day before the meeting.
Council minutes
Council records the decisions made at each
Council Meeting. Minutes of recent meetings
were available at Council offices and on Council’s
website for all meetings held during the current
calendar year (and preceding 12 month period)
as required by the
Local Government (General)
Regulations 2015
Regulation 12 (b).
Questions to Council
Community members had the opportunity to
raise questions in writing before an Ordinary
Council Meeting, which were then answered at
the meeting, or taken on notice with a written
response to be sent to the questioner.
Members of the public were also able to petition
Council, in accordance with the
Governance
(Meeting Procedure) Local Law No. 1
.
In 2015-2016, a total of six petitions were
presented to the Council for receiving and
response, and 34 questions were put to
the Council and answered at the meeting
or responded to in writing.
Administrators’ remuneration
and expenses
The Minister for Local Government sets the
remuneration paid to Council’s Administrators.
Expenses incurred by the Administrators in
undertaking their duties for Brimbank were
reported quarterly in a Governance Report
presented at an Ordinary Council Meeting,
in accordance with their Code of Conduct.
The total expenses reported for travel
and communications in these reports for
2015-2016 was $15,690.72.
Councillor Code of Conduct
The
Local Government Act 1989
(the Act) sets
out standards of conduct for Councillors, and
specific arrangements to deal with misconduct.
Section 76C of the Act requires a council to
have a Code of Conduct for Councillors.
Under Section 75B of the Act, a council must
adopt a reimbursement policy for Councillors.
Section 75C of the Act requires a Council to
make available prescribed minimum resources
for Councillors to carry out their duties.
The
Local Government Amendment (Improved
Governance) Act 2015
, passed in September
2015, resulted in a significant number of
changes to the Councillor conduct provisions of
the Act, and subsequently, the Code.
The Act now requires a person elected to be a
Councillor to make a written declaration they
will abide by a Code, within three months of
being declared elected and within one month of
any amendments to a Code being approved. A
Code must also be reviewed and adopted within
four months of a municipal general election,
at a Special Council Meeting. The other key
requirement introduced for a Code, is for it to
include an internal resolution procedure for
addressing alleged contraventions of a Code,
including allowing for the appointment of an
independent arbiter.
The majority of the new conduct provisions
of the Act came into effect on 1 March 2016.
Councils were required to review their Codes
and make any changes at a Special Council
Meeting called solely for that purpose,
by 4 July 2016.
Consultation
The final draft Code was proposed to be made
a Major Policy under the
Governance (Major
Policy Consultation) Local Law
. This triggers
a community consultation process prior to
the making of, amendment or revocation
of the Code.
The draft Code was released for community
consultation in July 2015, for a period of 28
days, with written submissions invited. At the
end of the submissions period, no submissions
or comment had been received.
Structure of the Code
The aim of the Code was to provide Councillors
with a centralised document covering all
aspects of conduct and support relating to their
role. The Code is structured into two parts:
Part One: Conduct -
includes:
• The
Commitment, Values and Principles
to be demonstrated by Councillors
• The
Roles and Relationships
of
Councillors and Council officers
• How Councillors will
Conduct
themselves
• Protocols for
Civic Representation
including with media, social media and events
Internal Resolution Procedure
for an alleged breach of the Code.
Part Two: Support -
includes:
• The
Resources Support
available to a
Councillor to conduct their duties
• The support to be provided for
Professional
Development and Civic Representation
• The
Legal and Insurance
coverage available
Reimbursement of Expenses
and Exclusions
• The requirements for public
reporting
of support expenses.
04
Governance
and
Management
and other
information
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04
Governance and Management and other information |
Governance and Management

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2015-2016
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Attendance at Council Meetings by Administrators – 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2016
Name
Ordinary Council Meetings
(19 held)
Special Meetings
(2 held)
John Watson
17
2
Jane Nathan
17
2
John Tanner AM
19
2
The Code includes a Schedule of Documents
Incorporated by Reference (relevant Council
policies and organisational policies and
protocols that relate to Councillors).
Adoption of the Code
Council, in accordance with Sections 76C, 75B
and 75C of the Act and the Local Law, adopted
the Councillor Code of Conduct as a Major Policy
at a Special Council Meeting on 19 April 2016.
The Code was signed by Administrators in
the presence of the Chief Executive Officer
on 3 May 2016, in compliance with the
requirements of the Act.
A copy of the Code was given to each
Administrator, and made available on
Council’s website.
Local laws
Brimbank had three local laws, the
General
Local Law 2008
, which came into effect on
1 January 2008, the
Governance (Meeting
Procedure) Local Law No. 1 2015
, which came
into effect on 19 June 2015, and the
Governance
(Major Policy Consultation) Local Law No. 3
which came into effect on 18 July 2014.
Local laws apply within the area of the
City of Brimbank and act as subordinate
legislation to State and Federal laws.
General Local Law 2008
Brimbank’s
General Local Law 2008
was
adopted on 27 November 2007 and became
operational on 1 January 2008. The objectives
of the local law are to provide for the:
Governance and Management (continued)
• Administration of Council’s powers
and functions
• Protection, safe and fair use and
enjoyment of Council property
• Safe and fair use of streets, roads
and footpaths
• Protection, maintenance and enhancement
of the amenity of the municipality to
a standard that meets the general
expectations of the community
• Keeping and control of animals on land
and on Council property, and
• Uniform and fair administration
and enforcement of the local law.
The
General Local Law 2008
is available
for viewing on Council’s website.
Governance (Meeting Procedure)
Local Law No. 1 2015
Brimbank’s
Governance (Meeting Procedure)
Local Law No. 1 2015
was gazetted on 18 June
2015, and became operational on 19 June 2015.
The primary purposes of the local law are to:
• Provide for the procedures governing
the conduct of Council Meetings and
Committee Meetings
• Set the rules of behaviour for those
participating in and attending meetings, and
• Regulate the use of Council’s common seal.
The
Governance (Meeting Procedure)
Local Law No. 1 2015
is available for viewing
on Council’s website.
Governance (Major Policy
Consultation) Local Law No. 3 2014
Brimbank’s
Governance (Major Policy
Consultation) Local Law No. 3
was gazetted on
17 July 2014, and became operational on 18 July
2014. It enables Council to determine whether a
policy is, or is not, a ‘major policy’, and prescribes
a public consultation process to be followed
when the Council proposes to make, amend,
modify or revoke a ‘major policy’. The purpose
of the local law is to:
• Provide for some policies of Council
to be designated as major policies
• Prescribe the procedure to be followed
before making, amending, modifying or
revoking a major policy
• Promote transparency of decision-making
• Promote best practice in governance
processes, and
• Provide for the peace, order and good
government of the municipal district.
The following policies were made as major
policies in 2015-2016:
• Loan Repayment Reserve for Interest
Only Debt Major Policy – 22 September 2015
• Councillor Code of Conduct Major Policy –
19 April 2016
The
Governance (Major Policy Consultation)
Local Law No. 3 2016
is available for viewing
on Council’s website.
Council Advisory Committees
(with external representation)
Role of Committee
Nominated July 2015 -
December 2015
Administrator
Nominated January
2016 – June 2016
Administrator
Audit and Risk Management Committee
(ARMC)
Advisory Committee to Council established in accordance
with section 139(2) of the
Local Government Act 1989
,
to provide oversight of internal and external audit activities.
John Watson
John Watson
John Tanner AM
Community Consultative /
Reference Committee
(with external representation)
Role of committee
Nominated July 2015 -
December 2015
Administrator
Nominated January
2016 – June 2016
Administrator
Australia Day Awards
Selection Committee
Selection of Australia Day Award recipients.
John Watson
John Watson
Brimbank Arts
Advisory Committee
To oversee the operational aspects of the
Brimbank Arts Collection Policy Guidelines 2011-2015.
Jane Nathan
Jane Nathan
Brimbank Community Fund Committee
(Advisory Committee to Lord Mayor’s
Charitable Fund)
To provide guidance of the administration of the Brimbank Community Fund.
John Tanner AM
John Tanner AM
Brooklyn Industrial Precinct
Strategy Committee
To provide advice and recommendations to Council
on the amenity of Brooklyn Industrial Precinct.
Jane Nathan
Jane Nathan
Community Liaison Committee –
Former Sunshine Quarry Committee
To examine the management of environmental, amenity
and traffic issues, as well as planning for the end use of the site.
John Tanner AM
Committee ceased
24 November 2015
Errington Precinct Master Plan
Implementation (Phase 1)
Community Reference Group
To provide for community input into the implementation
of Phase 1 of the Errington Precinct Master Plan.
John Tanner AM
John Tanner AM
Heritage Advisory Committee
To provide a forum for Council to work with the local community to promote
the retention, protection and enhancement of Brimbank’s heritage.
Jane Nathan
Jane Nathan
Municipal Emergency
Management Plan Committee
To ensure all agencies are involved in emergency
planning for the municipality.
John Watson
John Watson
St Albans Connect Strategic
Partnership Group
To provide governance for the St Albans Connect Project,
a Council initiative to coordinate the social, community
and physical infrastructure in the St Albans area.
John Tanner AM
Jane Nathan
(substitute
Council representative)
John Tanner AM
Jane Nathan
(substitute
Council representative)
Sunshine Town Centre
Partnership Group
To assist in the implementation of the Sunshine Rising program.
To assist Council realise the vision for Sunshine Town Centre.
Jane Nathan
Jane Nathan
Sydenham Town Centre
Partnership Group
To facilitate regular dialogue between Council, QIC and relevant agencies,
relating to the Sydenham Town Centre.
John Watson
Committee ceased
24 November 2015
Brooklyn Community
Reference Group
To foster collaboration between community, industry and government,
to ensure ongoing clean air in the Brooklyn area.
Jane Nathan
Jane Nathan
LeadWest Ltd Board
Representing the councils of Brimbank, Hobsons Bay, Maribyrnong,
Moonee Valley, Melton and Wyndham, to support sustainable growth
and regional development in Melbourne’s West.
John Watson
(Delegate)
John Tanner AM
(alternate Delegate)
John Watson
(Delegate)
John Tanner AM
(alternate Delegate)
Metropolitan Local Governments’
Waste Management Forum
To assist in the implementation of the Victorian Government’s ‘Waste and
Resource Recovery Policy – Getting Full Value’ and management
and administration of waste disposal contracts.
John Tanner AM
John Tanner AM
Metropolitan Transport Forum
Advocacy group for promotion of effective, efficient
and equitable transport in metropolitan Melbourne.
John Tanner AM
John Tanner AM
Municipal Association of Victoria
(MAV) State Council
Victorian Local Government peak body, comprised of representatives whose
role is to advocate on behalf of the industry and support its development, and
represent the interests of their council by presenting its position on issues.
John Watson
(Delegate)
Jane Nathan
(substitute Delegate)
John Watson