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Brimbank
Annual Report
2016-2017
Dynamic Centre of the West
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I Dynamic Centre of the West
About this Annual Report
Brimbank City Council’s 2016-2017 Annual Report details
Council’s performance during that financial year and includes a
report against the objectives set out in Brimbank’s
Council Plan
2013-2017
.
The Brimbank City Council Annual Report 2016-2017 aims
to fulfil Council’s statutory responsibilities under the
Local
Government Act 1989
and
Information Privacy Act 2000
.
To obtain a copy of this document, please contact Council’s
Customer Service Centre on
9249 4000
or view a copy
online at
brimbank.vic.gov.au
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
3
Contents
About this Annual Report
2
01 Introduction
4
Welcome to the Report of Operations 2016-2017
4
Snapshot of Council
5
Snapshot of service delivery
7
Highlights of the year
12
Challenges and future outlook
15
The year in review
16
Message from the Mayor
16
Chief Executive Officer’s message
18
Financial summary
20
Description of operations
22
Significant service achievements 2016-2017
24
Strategies, policies and plans adopted
28
Major changes
29
Our Council
30
About the Councillors
30
About the Council
31
02 Our people
34
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2017
35
Organisation structure at 30 June 2017
36
Workforce profile
37
Equal Opportunity
39
Other staff matters
39
03 Our performance
42
Planning and Accountability Framework
43
Council Plan Strategic Objectives
44
Strategic Objective 1:
Council and the Community Working Together
46
Strategic Objective 2:
Community Wellbeing
49
Strategic Objective 3:
Urban Design and Infrastructure
54
Strategic Objective 4:
Sustainable Environments
58
Strategic Objective 5:
Industry and Economic Development and Strategic Sites
61
Strategic Objective 6:
Organisational Effectiveness
62
04 Governance and Management
and other information
63
Governance and Management
64
Statutory information
73
2017 Community Satisfaction Survey
77
Advocacy, consultation and community engagement
79
Volunteering in Brimbank
82
05 Sustainability
83
Sustainability
84
Awards
88
06 Performance Statement
90
Description of municipality
91
Sustainable Capacity Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2017 91
Service Performance Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2017 92
Financial Performance Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2017 94
Other Information
96
Certification of the Performance Statement
97
Independent Auditor’s Report
98
07 Financial Report
100
A Plain English Guide to the Annual Financial Report
102
Financial statements
104
Certification of the Financial Statements
147
Independent Auditor’s Report
148
Acronyms
150
Index
151

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01
Introduction
Welcome to the
Report of Operations
2016-2017
Council is transparent
and accountable
in reporting to the
community. The Report
of Operations 2016-2017
explains in detail the
Council’s operations and
performance during the
financial year.

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
5
01 Introduction
I
Snapshot of Council
Snapshot of Council
About Brimbank
Who we are
Brimbank is a vibrant, growing community in the
heart of Melbourne’s west. Diversity is central
to our identity – we are proudly multicultural,
embracing people from around the world and
weaving their stories into our own. Brimbank’s
estimated resident population of 202,863
in 2016 makes it the third most populous
municipality in Greater Melbourne.
Where we came from
The City of Brimbank was established in 1994,
uniting the former Keilor and Sunshine councils.
It was named after Brimbank Park in Keilor,
which gained its name from the practice of
farmers driving livestock ‘around the brim of the
bank’ of the Maribyrnong River.
The land the municipality now occupies has
a human history that began with Aboriginal
traditional custodians, the Kulin Nation, more
than 40,000 years before European settlement.
The area was originally occupied by the Kurung
Jang-Balluk and Marin-Balluk clans of the native
Wurundjeri people.
The first European settlements were
established at Keilor in the late 1840s, Sunshine
(then known as Braybrook Junction) in the mid-
1880s, and St Albans in the late 1880s. Many
suburbs grew around the original settlements
after World War II to house the influx of
migrants. More recently, areas that were once
industrial hubs have been transformed into new
residential suburbs that are continuing to grow
rapidly.
Our place
Brimbank spans an area between 11 and 23
kilometres north-west of Melbourne’s CBD.
It is bound by the City of Hume in the north, the
cities of Maribyrnong and Moonee Valley in the
east, the cities of Hobsons Bay and Wyndham in
the south, and the City of Melton in the west.
Fifteen per cent of Brimbank’s total area is
classified as open space, including natural
treasures such as Organ Pipes National Park
and Mount Derrimut Grasslands, as well as
Green Gully Reserve, Brimbank Park and Iramoo
Wildflower Grassland Reserve.
Our strategic position at the heart of
Melbourne’s west has been cemented with
major infrastructure commitments that
continue to transform the region. Sunshine’s
railway station was completely rebuilt during
the Regional Rail Link project, while the removal
of level crossings in Furlong Road and Main
Road has united the two halves of St Albans
and drastically improved safety. The Joan Kirner
Women’s and Children’s Hospital in Sunshine,
due for completion in late 2018, will offer
children’s services and enable more women to
give birth closer to home.
Our suburbs are as diverse as our people – from
the hustle and bustle of Sunshine and St Albans
to historic Keilor, each has its own flavour and
personality.
Sunshine: A major activity centre, Sunshine’s
profile is rising due to its proximity to the city
and its mouth-watering food scene. It houses
a Victoria University campus, the Brimbank
Community and Civic Centre, and Sunshine
Hospital. Sunshine services suburbs which
include Albion, Sunshine North, Sunshine West
and part of Brooklyn.
St Albans: St Albans is a designated major
activity centre that includes a Victoria University
campus, the newly developed St Albans
Community Centre and Bowery Theatre, and a
thriving restaurant and retail precinct. St Albans
services neighbouring suburbs Albanvale, Kings
Park and Kealba.
Deer Park: Servicing the nearby suburbs of
Ardeer, Derrimut and Cairnlea, Deer Park has
a rich array of restaurants and shops. Major
features of the area include the Hunt Club
Community and Arts Centre, Black Powder Mill
and Brimbank Central Shopping Centre.
Sydenham: Brimbank’s third activity centre,
Sydenham services suburbs including
Sydenham, Calder Park, Taylors Lakes, Delahey
and parts of Hillside. Watergardens Town Centre
is the jewel in its crown, while Calder Park
Motorsport Complex is another landmark.
Keilor: Keilor is set among rolling hills and national
and state parks, including Organ Pipes National
Park, Brimbank Park and Green Gully Reserve. It
services suburbs including Keilor Downs, Keilor
North, Keilor Park and Keilor Downs as well as
parts of Keilor, Keilor East and Tullamarine.
Our people
Brimbank is one of the most culturally diverse
municipalities in Australia, with almost half of
our residents born outside of Australia.
Brimbank’s suburbs boomed after World War II,
when migrants from southern Europe flowed to
the area. More recently, newly arrived Asian and
African communities have developed alongside
the more established European communities.
More than half of our residents speak a
language other than English at home, with more
than 160 languages represented. The top 10
languages other than English are Vietnamese,
Maltese, Italian, Greek, Macedonian, Filipino,
Cantonese, Arabic, Punjabi and Croatian.
Brimbank is increasingly becoming a major
employment hub for Melbourne’s west.
Manufacturing is the key employer in Brimbank,
followed by retail, health care and social
assistance.
Brimbank is home to a range of established
organisations, including Aldi, ARC, Australia Post,
Boral, Bunnings, Caterpillar, FedEx, Ferguson
Plarre, Fisher and Paykel, Hunter Leisure, John
Deere, Lombards, Schweppes, Schiavello and
Sims Metal.
In more recent times companies such as
IBM, Metronode, Digital Realty, Rand Group,
Preshafruit, Sleepyhead and Vistaprint have
also chosen to settle in Brimbank.
Reconciliation and Indigenous
information
Brimbank has a rich Indigenous history, going
back to when the Wurundjeri people first
inhabited the region, thriving in the Maribyrnong
Valley.
Council acknowledges the Kulin nation of
people as the traditional owners of the land, the
continuing spiritual connection to the land and
renews its commitment to respect Indigenous
beliefs, values and customs.
About 440 Registered Aboriginal Places exist
in the Brimbank Local Government Area. The
oldest artefacts found in the City are over
30,000 years old.
On 26 February 2008, Council adopted the
full motion passed by the Federal Government
on 13 February 2008 in saying sorry to the
Stolen Generations on behalf of the Australian
Parliament and people, and extended an
apology to those Stolen Generations on behalf
of the people of Brimbank.

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12km
BALLARAT
GEELONG
BENDIGO
BRIMBANK
MELTON
GROWTH AREA
WYNDHAM
GROWTH AREA
Melbourne Airport
Port of Melbourne
INNER
MELBOURNE
SUNSHINE
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Since July 2011, Council has flown both the
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags
alongside the Australian national flag every day
outside its Municipal Office.
Each year Brimbank City Council hosts a broad
range of activities during Reconciliation and
NAIDOC Week, such as Aboriginal cultural
heritage tours, Sorry Day events, Indigenous art
exhibitions, library story-telling sessions and
NAIDOC flag raisings.
On 17 April 2012, Council endorsed a
Reconciliation Statement of Commitment and
officially signed the Statement on 29 May 2012,
committing it to learning from the past and
seeking new ways to build relationships with the
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community,
and to developing a Reconciliation Action Plan.
It was committed that the Reconciliation Action
Plan would be developed in consultation with
internal and external stakeholders including
Council staff, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
residents and local Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander service providers and community groups.
In May 2013, Council adopted a Reconciliation
Action Plan that demonstrates its commitment
to reconciliation for all Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people.
In September 2016, a
Memorandum of
Understanding
(MOU) between Brimbank City
Council and the Wurundjeri Tribe Land and
Compensation Cultural Heritage Council was
signed, marking an important step toward
reconciliation and reaffirming the genuine
connection, pride and belonging for our
Indigenous community.
Snapshot of Council (continued)
Brimbank at a glance
u
Area
123 square kilometres
u
Population count
202,863
(estimated resident population, June 2016)
u
Males
50.0%
u
Females
50.0%
u
Residents aged under 18 years 22.1%
u
Residents aged between
18 and 59 years
58.9%
u
Residents aged 60 years and over 19.0%
u
Indigenous population
816
u
Residents who speak a
non-English language at home 58.4%
u
Median house price for 2016 $495,092
(June 2016)
Source of Data:
Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population
and Housing 2016 (Usual residence). Compiled and
presented in profile.id by .id, the population experts -
http://www.id.com.au
The median house price for 2016 was sourced from
Hometrack 2011-2016, Housing Valuation System.
Compiled and presented in economy.id by .id, the
population experts - http://www.id.com.au
Vision, Mission, Values and Statement
of Strategic Intent
Brimbank’s Council Plan 2013-2017
sets out
Council’s Vision, Statement of Strategic Intent,
Mission and Values as follows:
Vision
Brimbank will be the dynamic centre of
Melbourne’s west. We will be a proud, diverse
and connected community.
Statement of Strategic Intent
Develop Brimbank through enhancing and
celebrating the many diverse identities,
communities and cultures within Brimbank;
creating high quality spaces and places; and
providing learning and employment opportunities.
Mission
Brimbank City Council will strive to achieve the
community’s vision by:
• Meeting the needs of our community and
those of future generations in a collaborative
and financially responsible manner
• Enhancing community wellbeing within a
strong foundation of social justice
• Creating an urban environment that is safe,
attractive, vibrant and liveable
• Demonstrating commitment to environmental
protection, sustainable development and
reducing our ecological footprint
• Promoting Brimbank as the first choice for
new industry, business and development
• Delivering best practice services that meet
the needs of the diverse and growing
Brimbank community.
Values
For Brimbank City Council employees and the
Council, to be the best at what they do and
achieve the community vision and Council
strategic intent and mission, their actions
and decisions are guided by a set of five
fundamental and unifying values:
u
we show
RESPECT
u
we act with
INTEGRITY
u
we work
TOGETHER
u
we
COMMUNICATE
openly
u
we strive for
EXCELLENCE
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
7
01 Introduction
I
Snapshot of Council
I
Snapshot of service delivery
Snapshot of service delivery
Children, youth
and family services
Council delivers a range of services for families
and young children and opportunities for young
people to develop skills and contribute to
community life.
What we delivered
• Coordinated home-based child care with 197
equivalent full-time child care places and
1203 monitoring visits to 50 active Family Day
Care Educators, contributing 357,660 hours
of care
• Supported provision of child care at nine
centres
• Maintained 30 preschool premises
• Processed 2523 four-year-old preschool
applications
• Supported playgroups with Smalltalk
intervention in 13 groups, two shopping
centre playgroups, 88 community playgroups
combining facilitated and volunteer
• Conducted 2988 Maternal and Child Health
first home visits
• Completed 23,386 Key Age Stage visits, 3067
additional appointments and 3434 telephone
consultations
• Provided Youth Support and Counselling
Services to 148 young people
• Supported a range of youth programs
attended by 1141 young people
• Coordinated 17 events attended by 440
young people
• Delivered two youth music stages attended
by 950 community members
• Supported various youth programs including
Brimbank Youth Events Committee, New
Change Creative Residency, Stir It Up and L2R
with a total engagement of 45 young people
• In partnership with Edmund Rice Community
and Refugee Service provided in-kind venue
support for 181 local young people
Leisure and community facilities
Council provides a range of sport and recreation opportunities for the community to engage in
healthy physical activity, sport and social activities at its leisure centres. Council also delivers
community infrastructure such as community hubs and sport and recreation facilities to strengthen
local communities.
• $100,000 of external funding from Sport
Recreation Victoria secured to complete
Dempster Park Cricket nets upgrade
• $60,000 of external funding from Sport
Recreation Victoria secured to complete
Keilor Park Soccer change rooms
• $45,000 of external funding from Sport
Recreation Victoria secured to complete a
Western Region Planning Project: Women in
Sport Action Plan
• Facilitated 300,209 visits to the Keilor
Basketball and Netball Stadium. Netball-related
attendance increased by 44 per cent to 47,601
• Facilitated 7190 games of basketball and
netball games at the Keilor Basketball and
Netball Stadium
• 34 community facilities managed available for
regular, casual and function hire
• 136 community groups managed across 26
different nationalities with 6573 regular hire
bookings at community facilities
• 19,575 attendances at functions held in
community facilities available for function
hire, 345,735 attendances at regular hire
bookings and 17,030 attendances at casual
bookings held in community facilities
• A total of 355,360 people visiting community
facilities each year
• Eight capital works community facility
improvement projects for community benefit
with a total contribution of $575,000
• Online community space bookings for
Keilor Community Hub and the Brimbank
Community and Civic Centre made available
for residents and community members
• Renewed seven leases and licences involving
scouts, guides, senior citizen clubs and
community groups
• Facilitated 576,036 visits to aquatic facilities
including 353,574 member visits
• Facilitated 55,179 group fitness visits across
4185 classes with an average of 13 people
per class
• 61,168 learn to swim lessons
• 26,596 rounds of golf played at Keilor Public
Golf Course
What we delivered
• Management of 79 sports clubs using 130
sports facilities
• Supported sports clubs to provide 12,050
children and adults with sports participation
opportunities
• Provided 411 sporting opportunities to
disadvantaged children through In2Sport
Brimbank, Council’s sports club membership
subsidy program
• $15,000 of external funding secured from
Cricket Victoria and Football Federation
Victoria for In2Sport Brimbank
• Delivered 11 Sports Club Development
network meetings to educate and inform
Brimbank sports clubs
• 230 sports clubs volunteers attended
Council-delivered volunteer training sessions
• Successfully delivered the Brimbank Cup with
32 teams competing including 14 community
teams and eight female teams. This year saw
the inclusion of a seven-a-side competition
as well as a junior clinic with Melbourne City
Football Club with 125 kids attending. The cup
was delivered in partnership with Cairnlea
Football Club, Football Federation Victoria,
Melbourne City Football Club and Victoria Police
• 5232 Brimbank residents involved in the
Active Premiers Challenge
• 15 sports-related capital works projects
completed to improve sports facilities for
community benefit
• Supported 12 Heart Foundation Walking
Groups, assisting over 150 community
members to stay active
• Developed and implemented the In2Tennis
program, providing 560 community members
an opportunity to play tennis
• Supported the continued development of the
Community Soccer Hub, providing a place for
the newly emerging communities to come
together through soccer
• 101 residents involved in the Sons of the West
Men’s Health Program run at two locations
with 67 men graduating from the program

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Culture and community strengthening
Council offers a range of services to the community including arts and culture, events, and community centres.
• Coordinated four Brimbank Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Reconciliation Action
Plan Consultative Committee meetings
• Successfully applied for a federal grant
to deliver events as part of National
Reconciliation Week
• Successfully worked with Foodworks to
deliver a mentoring program for Brimbank
Carers and international corporation Miele
• Community Leadership Programs delivered
for 34 people
• Provided 18 Community Governance training
sessions to 295 participants
• Held three Brimbank Leadership Alumni
Networking events
• Provided Alumni Mentoring Program to
12 Brimbank Leadership Alumni members
• 78 children participated in nine projects as
part of the Dynamic Young Citizens project
• 100 volunteers participated in volunteer
training held during Volunteer Week
• 37 volunteers joined Brimbank City Council
increasing the total number of volunteers to
404 • Provided 21 $250 Neighbour Day Grants to
support 752 people to participate in various
activities organised by 89 neighbours across
21 locations
• Supported three Brimbank schools to take
part in a Neighbour Day artwork exhibition
between March and April 2017
• Coordinated
Brimbank Council Plan 2017-
2021
and Budget 2017/2018 consultations
comprising 10 public sessions where
249 people participated in face-to-face
consultations, 103 online surveys, 228
postcards and 10 submissions received
respectively
• Hosted 20 public exhibitions for the
Brimbank
Draft Council Plan 2017-2021
and Draft
Budget 2017-2018 at all Brimbank libraries
between May and June 2017
• Conducted one school tour of the Brimbank
Community and Civic Centre and one school
onsite visit as part of Council’s civic education
program
What we delivered
• Officially opened Keilor Community Hub to the
community incorporating customer service,
Keilor Library and neighbourhood house
facilities
• Provided community grants funding to 73
community groups valued at about $330,000
• Delivered two grant information sessions and
two grant writing sessions to 40 people
• Conducted four Places of Worship tours
attended by 160 people
• Launched the Brimbank Maribyrnong
Interfaith Network Articles of Faith:
A Collection of Interfaith Stories video
• Partnered with key organisations to hold four
Interfaith community events – Christmas
community lunch, Buddhist Council of
Victoria’s 20th Anniversary community event,
International Women’s Day and Refugee
Week attended by more than 180 people
• Successfully delivered four ‘Living In Your
Neighbourhood’ sessions to 183 English
language students
• Coordinated 10 community events: NAIDOC
Flag raising community activities; Mullagh
Wills Foundation – Reconciliation Through
Sport initiative; Carers Week; International
Day of Persons with a Disability Expo;
Brimbank Seniors Festival and Cuckoo
Restaurant Bus Trip; Outing Disability
Exhibition and Panel Discussion as part of
Midsumma; International Women’s Day;
National Reconciliation Week – Brimbank
Reconciliation Walk; and Community Welcome
Dinner as part of Refugee Week.
• More than 70 partnerships developed and/or
maintained to deliver programs/events and
activities to more than 1000 people
• Coordinated six National Disability Insurance
Scheme presentations and information
sessions to 180 people
• Coordinated four community networks –
Brimbank Disability Network Group, Brimbank
Maribyrnong Interfaith Network, Brimbank
Active Seniors and Brimbank Seniors Forums,
attended by more than 530 people
• Conducted two Keilor listening posts to shape
the future use of the former Keilor library site
• Held more than 10 meetings with the Kororoit
Creek Neighbourhood House Association Inc.
in preparation for the Albion House transition
as a community managed Neighbourhood
House
• Chaired four Brimbank Service Provider
Network meetings
• 19,325 hours of programs run across the
seven neighbourhood houses
• 49 special events run by neighbourhood
houses
• 105 volunteers supporting the delivery of
programs at seven neighbourhood houses
• Brimbank Sustainable Living Expo attended
by more than 3000 people
• Brimbank Men’s Health Day event attended
by more than 250 people
• Officially opened the Westvale Men’s Shed
with the opening event attended by more
than 150 people
• Partnerships with more than 34 community
groups and organisations
Snapshot of service delivery (continued)

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
9
01 Introduction
I
Snapshot of service delivery
Waste and recycling
Council provides a comprehensive waste service
to the community while striving to manage
waste sustainably.
What we delivered
• Introduced online services on Council’s
website to allow people to apply for a new, or
amend an existing, bin service
• Weekly domestic waste and fortnightly
recycling collection for 68,863 households
and fortnightly green waste collection for
38,207 households
• Lifted 6,365,096 bins
• Collected 43,242 tonnes of waste
• Recycled 16,362 tonnes of waste
• Collected 12,567 tonnes of green waste
• Collected and recycled 3982 tonnes of hard
waste, 273 tonnes of steel, 8915 mattresses
and 3572 tyres in the annual kerbside hard
waste collection service
• Collected 36,752 kilograms of paint, 13,900
litres of motor oil and 1300 kilograms of
household batteries
• Accepted 500 kilograms of fluorescent
tubes, 461 car batteries, 57,230 kilograms
of e-waste and 3593 gas cylinders at the
permanent Detox Your Home centre at
Stadium Drive, Keilor Park
Environmental health
Council has a responsibility to provide services
and information to the community in order to
protect the public from disease, provide safety
and ensure wellbeing.
What we delivered
• Conducted 1716 food premise inspections
• Administered 3458 vaccinations to infants
• Administered 8469 vaccinations to school
aged children
Planning and building
Council is responsible for planning permit approvals, providing building permit services, and
conducting inspections of building works and fire safety audits.
• 378 Building Notices and Orders served
• 77 illegal rooming house inspections
• 51 swimming pool barrier inspections
• 50 essential services maintenance
inspections
• 23 emergency call-outs
• 471 investigations resulting from
building-related complaints
• 312 illegal building works identified
• 11 Magistrates’ Court prosecutions for
building compliance
What we delivered
• Introduced online services on Council’s
website to allow people to apply for:
- A building permit or request a quote
- A report and consent
- Copies of building documents
- Register a Building Permit – Private
Surveyors
- Request to Vary or Extend the Time of a
Building Permit
- Property Information
• Introduced online services on Council’s
website to allow people to apply for:
- A planning permit
- A planning permit: amend
- Copies of planning permits and/or
endorsed plans
- Demolition form
- Planning – Extension of Time
- Planning advice
- Planning objection form
- Plans subject to Conditions
• 1085 planning application decisions made
• 569 planning-related property information
requests received
• 222 subdivision applications received
• 491 investigations resulting from planning
compliance complaints
• 1238 inspections resulting from planning
compliance complaints
• 28 Magistrates’ Court prosecutions for
planning compliance
• 53 Planning Infringement Notices issued
• $491.36 million total value of new building
projects requiring building permits
• 248 report and consent requests received
and processed for buildings
• 348 mandatory building inspections
• 2190 building-related property information
requests
• 288 requests for copies of plans received

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Library services
Brimbank’s five libraries offer collections of books,
magazines, DVDs, toys and other items as well as
programs and information services for the whole
community at no charge, and cater for all ages.
A Home Library Service operates for people who
are unable to visit the library. Library programs
support lifelong learning and include weekly
story times and computer classes. All libraries
offer study facilities, Wi-Fi, Internet and computer
access and printing. Of the 220,280 items
available to borrow, 27 per cent are on loan at any
given time. The library’s online services include
e-reference, downloadable e-books and audio
books, access to hundreds of online magazines,
and newspapers in over 60 languages.
What we delivered
• 26,914 new physical items added to the collection
in English and 19 community languages
• 2,259,094 total library visits; of these visits,
1,310,805 were made to the five libraries and
948,289 to the online library
• 1,381,637 collection loans; of these, 975,895
physical items were borrowed and 405,740
electronic resources were utilised
• 200,741 catalogue searches completed
• 16,055 new library members registered
bringing the total library membership to 77,071
• 76,844 active library members
• 275,670 Internet bookings made
• 121,545 instances of IT help provided to the
community
• 13,516 video game bookings made
• 140,014 reference questions answered
• 3339 library programs delivered with 63,136
people attending:
- 1446 children’s programs with 41,886
children attending
- 96 teen programs with 1220 teens attending
- 1015 adult programs with 9767 adults
attending
- 656 IT classes with 2,806 people attending;
these included classes in languages other
than English and those aimed at seniors
• 800 people attended the Brimbank Writers
& Readers Festival
• 1291 Home Library Service visits delivered
by 34 volunteers to 78 active Home Library
Service customers in their homes
• 1100 children registered for the 1000 Books
Before School program
City compliance
Council is responsible for providing education
and enforcement through relevant legislation,
local laws and Council policies, and maintains
a safe and healthy environment in which the
community can enjoy a quality of life that meets
their expectations.
What we delivered
• Introduced online services on Council’s
website to allow people to:
- Apply for an Excess Pet Permit
- Apply for a lifelong pet tag replacement form
- Register a domestic animal
• 14,936 compliance service enquiries attended
to, including 2921 for parking, 1102 for local
law, 688 for litter, 1526 for abandoned/
derelict vehicles, 2862 for condition of land,
1814 enquiries about cats, 2365 enquiries
about dogs, 202 regarding other animals
• 2853 stray animals collected by Council
(960 dogs, 1832 cats, 61 other animals)
• 13,655 pets registered (10,583 dogs and
3072 cats)
• Eight dog attack prosecutions and 489
infringements for animal-related matters
• 20,350 parking infringements and 567 local
law infringements issued
• 1500 vacant properties inspected and 850
fire hazard reduction notices issued; of
these, 240 land owners were issued with
infringements and 93 properties had to be
cut by Council’s contractor
• 81 event permits issued
• 112 school crossings supervised every
school day
• 514 individual littering investigations
conducted, 299 of these proactively
detected by Litter Officer
Roads, footpaths, drains
and building maintenance
Council is responsible for managing the City’s
local roads, footpaths and other assets.
What we delivered
• Introduced online services on Council’s
website to allow people to apply for:
- Property Information
- A Vehicle Crossing
- An Asset Protection Permit
- Consent to Build on Land Liable to Flooding
or Designated Land
- Consent to Construct Over/In an Easement
• Introduced online forms to make it easy
for residents to report issues about roads,
footpaths, dumped rubbish or bins, and issues
at parks and reserves via Council’s website
• 1240 kilometres of underground drain
pipes managed and maintained along
with 60 kilometres of table drains
• 45,073 storm water pits, 361 litter traps
and 39 gross pollutant traps maintained
and cleaned
• 3936 drain pits inspected and cleaned
• 2069 litter traps inspected and cleaned
• 909 kilometres of local roads inspected
and maintained, including 14 kilometres
of unsealed roads
• 1490 kilometres of footpaths inspected
and maintained
• 80,000 street/road signs proactively
inspected and maintained and 5994 signs
physically maintained
• About 31,000 kilometres of residential
and commercial kerb and channel swept
• 2175 tonnes collected through street
sweeping program
• 110,300 street litter bins emptied
• 2387 tonnes of litter collected through the
street litter bin and manual litter collection
service
• 187,970 square metres of road pavement
resealed
• 266 buildings maintained on 165 sites
• 212 playgrounds maintained, of which 153 are
in open space and 59 in preschools, child care
and community centres
Snapshot of service delivery (continued)

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
11
01 Introduction
I
Snapshot of service delivery
Ageing and inclusion
Council’s Ageing and Inclusion services for the
community include Home and Community Care
(HACC) and Community Aged Care Packages
(CACP), and a range of Community Programs
including Community Transport, HACC Planned
Activity Groups (PAG), volunteers and seniors.
These services support, maintain and enhance
the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of
older people and people with a disability living
in Brimbank.
What we delivered
• 72,826 meals on wheels
• 34,617 hours of domestic assistance
• 14,935 hours of personal care
• 3049 people received a Home and
Community Care service
• 10,520 hours of respite care
• 3297 hours of property maintenance
• 43,811 hours of planned activity support
services
• 5012 hours of assessment and care
management
• 29,343 passenger trips on Brimbank’s
community transport buses
Parks, open spaces and environment
Council is responsible for upgrading and maintaining local parks, creek corridors, sports grounds,
municipal reserves and street trees.
What we delivered
• Upgraded four neighbourhood parks
• Completed suburban park upgrade at
Dellbridge Drive Reserve, Sydenham, and
Delahey Drive Reserve (Stage two), Delahey
• Developed new BMX track at Ardeer
Community Park
• Planted more than 60,660 new trees as part
of One Million Trees planting initiative
• Planted 4455 trees along streets and main
roads
• Upgraded Keilor Village Shopping Village
• Extended the shared user path along Old
Calder Highway, from Cliff Harvey Lagoon
Reserve to Kennedy Street, Keilor
• Completed upgrade of Dawson Street,
Sunshine (Stage 1)
• 46 conservation sites managed to improve
habitat for indigenous flora and fauna,
covering 370 hectares
• Four ecological burns completed to reduce
biomass and increase vegetation quality,
covering two hectares
• 12,000 indigenous grasses, herbs, shrubs
and trees planted to restore habitat
• Maintained approximately 1180 hectares
of public open space, streetscapes, grassed
areas and soft landscaped areas
• Inspected and maintained approximately
200,000 trees in parks and streets including
powerline clearing works in line with Council’s
Electric Line Clearance Management Plan
• Carried out emergency tree works and
clean-up following a significant storm event
in October 2016 responding to more than
3000 customer calls for tree works during
the event
• Maintained 29 sports reserves comprising
63 playing fields
• Maintained 143 irrigation systems
• Maintained Keilor Public Golf Course

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
Highlights of the year
Strategic objective: Council and the community working together
Brimbank City Council is committed to working in close collaboration with the community, facilitating
a wide cross-section of community participation, including ‘hard to reach’ groups, through a variety
of forums and partnerships to better engage, develop, represent and communicate with our diverse
community. Brimbank City Council will fulfil its statutory and legal obligations to the community
and manage the municipality in a financially sustainable manner to meet the current needs of our
community and those of future generations.
Achievements:
• Opened the St Albans Community Centre
which features the Bowery Theatre
performance space. St Albans Community
Centre provides opportunities for the
community to come together to share arts,
culture, and ideas. Since opening on 18 March
2017, more than 1100 audience members
have seen a range of theatre, comedy, music,
film and dance works in the Bowery Theatre.
• Supported 73 community groups through
provision of $330,000 of community grant
funding.
• Held National Youth Week celebrations at
St Albans Community Centre featuring a
youth music stage, inflatable activities and
sports clinics attended by over 200 youth
and children.
• Supported the Dynamic Young Citizens of
Brimbank program which works with primary
aged children to build their civic pride,
community connectedness and involve them
in decision-making whilst increasing feelings
of safety in Brimbank. The program delivered
a community mural in St Albans and public
mosaic artworks in Ardeer.
• Partnered with cohealth to deliver ‘Stir It
Up’ youth project, providing opportunities
for young people with African or Pasifika
backgrounds to develop friendships and
engage in cultural exchange.
• Partnered with Joining The Dot to hold
a community welcome dinner as part
of Refugee Week. Eighty guests from
established and newly arrived communities
shared a meal together and engaged in
facilitated conversations led by Joining
The Dot volunteers.
• Facilitated the Western Youth Employment
partnership of six member councils and three
Local Learning and Employment Networks.
The partnership focuses on coordinated
action to create greater opportunity for
youth in the west to access employment.
• Delivered Council’s Community Governance
Training Program to community groups, small
not-for-profit organisations and interested
individuals across Brimbank, to support
good governance practice in community
organisations. The Community Governance
Training Program delivered 20 sessions to
335 participants.
• Delivered St Albans Community Centre
Community Showcase day which featured
community-based performances and
activities including ‘The Bowery Dance
Project’, ‘Kontiki Fashion Expo’, FReeZA youth
performances, Western Region Concert
Band, Kud Dukat (Bosnian Traditional Dance)
and Sri Lankan dances.
• Partnered with New Hope Foundation,
Asylum Seeker Resource Centre, Hazara
community and Horn of Africa community
members to deliver a Women’s Only
Swimming Program which supported
40 women to learn water safety skills.
• Supported 34 participants from diverse
communities to complete the Community
Leadership Program.
• Delivered the Brimbank Writers and Readers
Festival 2016, which had more than 800
participants over the length of the 10-day
festival, including a capacity filled opening
night with Clementine Ford and Dr Susan
Carland.
• Supported community members to be active
by linking six local walking groups to the
Heart Foundation Walking Program.
• Launched the 1000 Books Before School
program through Brimbank Libraries. This
three-year state-wide project, in partnership
with State Library of Victoria and the Public
Libraries Victoria network, aims to ready
pre-schoolers for school.
Strategic objective: Urban
design and infrastructure
Brimbank City Council is committed to fostering
strong pride for residents and visitors by
creating an urban environment that is attractive,
clean and green, and which improves living
and housing, business and recreational
opportunities, demonstrates environmental
leadership and fosters a sustainable economy.
Achievements:
• Opened the Brimbank Community and Civic
Centre (BCCC), including the Sunshine Library
and Learning Centre, Sunshine Customer
Service Centre, community meeting rooms
and Council Offices, on 25 July 2016.
Since opening, the new Brimbank Community
and Civic Centre has been recognised for its
architectural excellence. The building won a
2017 Victorian Architecture Award and the
new Sunshine Library was awarded Highly
Commended in the inaugural Australian
Library Design Awards 2017.
• Planned the refurbishment and management
of the Council operated area within the Visy
Cares Hub, Sunshine, to transform it into an
innovative education and learning space.
• Opened the new Keilor Community Hub which
incorporates the Keilor Library, on 3 April
2017. There has been a significant increase in
library visitation since opening.
• Strengthened the capacity of sports clubs
through delivery of club development
network meetings and online resource
programs such as Club Spot.
• Reconstructed the soccer pitch at Larisa
Reserve, St Albans, and upgraded sportsground
lighting at Delahey and Lionheart Reserve,
Taylors Lakes, in accordance with Council’s
Sports Facility Development Plan.
• Improved access and leisure opportunities
at Selwyn Park, Albion, including path
improvements, an outdoor gym, new shelter,
play features and tree planting.
• Installed a pop-up park in Hampshire Square,
Sunshine, which operated between March
and May 2017.
• Endorsed the Road Management Plan.
• Advocated for road safety improvements and
provided design feedback regarding level
crossing removals.
• Completed neighbourhood park upgrades at
Glenmaggie Reserve, St Albans and Pioneer
Park, Sydenham.

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
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01 Introduction
I
Highlights of the year
Strategic objective: Sustainable environments
Brimbank City Council is committed to promoting the long-term sustainable development of
the municipality. Council will do this by facilitating a dynamic and accessible environment that is
supported by a healthy and informed community that enjoys rich environmental characteristics
within the municipality. Council is committed to environmental protection, planning for sustainable
developments, improving the sustainability of our building stock, and reducing our ecological
footprint.
• Increased tree canopy and shade across
the municipality by planting nearly 500
street trees. This is part of implementation
of the Urban Forest Strategy that aims to
increase tree canopy and shade across the
municipality by planting 700,000 trees by
2030.
• Implemented the Sustainable Water
Management Strategy including Integrated
Water Cycle Management and Water Sensitive
Urban Design projects in road rehabilitation
works, car parks and improvement of
stormwater harvesting systems. Key projects
included Delahey Community Centre car park
and Deer Park Hall car park.
• Implemented energy efficient public street
lighting upgrades.
• Successfully targeted illegal dumping and
littering through the ‘Innovate to Abate’
project, co-funded with the Victorian
Government. This project resulted in a
reduced number of instances of dumped
rubbish and more targeted enforcement.
• Continued to actively participate in the
Western Alliance for Greenhouse Action
and launched the world-leading ‘How Well
Are We Adapting’ project for climate change
adaptation best practice.
Strategic objective: industry
and economic development
and strategic sites
Brimbank City Council is committed to providing
local employment and business development
opportunities while also ensuring that such
activities do not have a detrimental impact on
local communities. The municipality contains a
range of strategic sites (outside of town centres
or urban villages) that, due to their location, size,
environment or current or past use, can greatly
assist Council achieve its economic, social or
environmental objectives.
Achievements:
• Developed the Brimbank Economic
Development Strategy 2016-2020, which
included consultation with local industry,
businesses, partners and State Government.
The strategy was adopted by Council in
August 2016.
• Rezoned land to facilitate the development
of the former Sunshine Civic Precinct and
part of the Withers Street car park enabling
construction of the VicRoads office, and
preparing and exhibiting amendments for a
range of other sites.
• Prepared and exhibited the Brimbank Planning
Scheme Amendment C187 which proposes a
municipal development contribution plan and
overlay to help fund future infrastructure to
support growth and development in Brimbank.
• Commenced a place management program
in the St Albans Town Centre called ‘Go
St Albans’, and continued delivery of the
Sunshine Rising Program in the Sunshine
Town Centre.
• Continued support of the Sunshine and
St Albans Business Associations including
administration of the marketing and business
development special rates, and support
to establish the Keilor Village Business
Association.
• Facilitated community engagement into
the preparation of the Sunshine National
Employment and Innovation Cluster
Framework Plan, including a submission by
Council to the Victorian Planning Authority.
• Submitted an endorsed position in relation to
the draft Framework Plan for the Sunshine
National Employment and Innovation Cluster.
• Continued delivery of the Business
Development, networking and
communications program.
Achievements:
• Continued to implement the Brimbank
Walking and Cycling Strategy through
completion of the second stage of the Mount
Derrimut Road cycling path, Deer Park Station
to Village Link, and circuit paths at Selwyn
Park in Albion, and Delahey Reserve in
Delahey.
• Implemented a program of environmentally
sustainable initiatives and practices through
education programs that included Be a
Brimbank Gem recycling program, Stephanie
Alexander Kitchen Garden program at six
local schools, and a calendar to promote
engagement with the local natural
environment.
• Surveyed an additional 200 hectares of land
to identify native vegetation values. Over the
past five years Council has surveyed a total of
1200 hectares.
• Supported 170 volunteers to participate in a
National Tree Day planting at Sydenham Park.
The group planted over 1500 indigenous
trees and shrubs on the slopes of the
Maribyrnong Valley, to restore habitat for
local flora and fauna.

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
Strategic objective: Community wellbeing
Brimbank City Council is committed to creating an enhanced quality of healthy and active community
life where our rich cultures are celebrated, embraced and connected to the broader community.
Within a strong foundation of social justice, Council is committed to the provision of affordable
services and community infrastructure that builds healthy people and communities through
education, recreation, arts and culture, and sport.
• Opened and commenced operation at the
new Sunshine Maternal and Child Health
Centre in December 2016. The Centre is
purpose-built and provides a modern, user
friendly layout that allows provision of better
services to meet the needs of Brimbank
families.
• Provided 396 sporting opportunities to
families living in Brimbank through the
In2Sport Brimbank program. More than
200 children had never registered with the
program before, 84 were born overseas and
19 per cent were female.
• Implemented the Brimbank Children’s Plan
by increasing levels of participation in the
universal Maternal and Child Health Service
piloting outreach services in shopping centres
and implementing a Supported Playgroup
Project with the aim of improving transition to
school from kindergarten.
• Implemented the Brimbank Youth Strategy
through the C-Collective project that supports
youth entrepreneurship, and the Youth
Ambassadors program.
• Transitioned to the Commonwealth Home
Support Programme (CHSP) which required
changes to the delivery of Aged Care services
and programs.
• Supported participation in soccer through
the Community Soccer Hub, which now has
over 200 active participants. Eight community
ambassadors have been appointed to support
marginalised community access.
Strategic objective:
Organisational effectiveness
Brimbank City Council is committed to the
ongoing delivery of a broad range of services
that meet the needs and aspirations of the
diverse and growing Brimbank community.
Guided by the Australian Business Excellence
Framework, the ongoing development of our
staff is a critical element to our continuous
improvement of service delivery. We will
continue to benchmark services to ensure best
practice, lead by example, and implement best
practice services to the community.
Achievements:
• Eleven democratically elected Councillors
were sworn in on 8 November 2016.
Councillor representation on Advisory
Committees was finalised in November and
December 2016.
• Consulted with almost 600 community
members during February and March 2017, to
develop the new
Council Plan 2017-2021
and
the 2017-2018 Annual Budget.
• Updated Council’s Long Term Financial Plan to
reflect Victorian Government rate capping.
• Successfully pursued an extra $6.4M of
capital grant funding from external bodies
to reduce the burden of raising income from
rates.
• Launched a new website based on extensive
community research. The website includes
over 20 new online planning, building,
engineering, and city compliance services.
• Won an LGPro award for a new Electronic
Planning Application Process that enabled
Council to provide the planning permit
application process completely digitally from
start to finish, saving time and costs for both
the organisation and the applicants.
• Implemented customer call backs in April
2017. This allows customers to leave their
phone number while on hold to Council’s main
contact line, and for a Council Officer to return
their call.
Achievements:
• Completed the Brimbank Health and
Wellbeing Status Report 2017 that provides
evidence that underpins regional and local
health planning initiatives.
• Continued the partnership with the
Australian Health Policy Collaboration
(AHPC) to design programs and initiatives
that promote better health and wellbeing
outcomes for Brimbank residents.
• Supported art practice by accommodating 13
artists with disciplines such as puppeteering,
visual arts, textiles and illustrating, in Council
studios and shopfronts in Sunshine and
Deer Park, the Keilor Shed and Overnewton
Gatehouse.
• Endorsed the
Brimbank Disability Action Plan
2017-2020
.
• Supported implementation of the Working
Together with Men project that actively
engages Brimbank men in preventing violence
against women.
• Partnered with the Social Justice Coalition
to advocate for improvements to health
and wellbeing for the Brimbank Community.
Advocacy has included highlighting the
increase in rough sleeping in Brimbank and
calling for additional Victorian Government
funding for support services, and seeking
funding for services to support homelessness
from the Federal Government.
• Received Federal Government funding for
Reconciliation Week as part of the Indigenous
Advancement Strategy.
• Continued to implement and evaluate the
Brimbank Community Learning Strategy
2014-2017. Actions are driven by the
Brimbank Learning and Employment Steering
Committee (BLESC).
Highlights of the year (continued)

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
15
01 Introduction
I
Highlights of the year
I
Challenges and future outlook
Challenges and future outlook
Challenges
As we look to the future, a number of key challenges and opportunities have been identified for Brimbank:
• Land use planning that provides the right mix of industry, commercial and residential development.
• Creating healthy places and greener spaces that will support a diverse and increasing population.
• Providing sport and community facilities to meet community need, whilst operating in a cost constrained environment.
• Waste and energy minimisation and management that is innovative and cost effective. The short-term focus includes:
- encouraging best practice sustainable development design that incorporates environmental sustainability.
- ensuring that environmentally sustainable design measures are included in higher density developments and that enforceable conditions
are placed on permits.
- investigating the most efficient and sustainable practices of waste management, particularly in relation to the kerbside organic collection
recycling service.
• Improving education and employment outcomes for our community. This will be achieved through advocacy and partnerships.
• Advocating for improved transport connections to enable travel across Brimbank and to the City.
• Maintaining financial sustainability despite rate capping and a reduction in the availability of external grants. Council will continue to seek
external funding sources to reduce the impact of rate capping on the community.
• Delivering equitable and quality community services whilst transitioning through the Aged Care and Disability Service Reform process.
• Improving health outcomes for our community through partnerships and advocacy.
The future
• Develop an Advocacy Plan and Framework.
• Prepare a new
Council Plan 2017-2021
.
• Redevelop St Albans Leisure Centre.
• Review the guiding document for the management of sport and recreation facilities, the Brimbank Sports Facility Development Plan.
• Finalise St Albans Town Centre urban design and implement the streetscape upgrade.
• Complete the Community Facilities Improvement Plan and Community Infrastructure Plan.
• Provide additional open space for the community through completion of Sunvale Community Park.
• Review the Brimbank Social Justice Charter.
• Develop a long-term road works program that is informed by recently completed video footage of road asset defects.
• Develop the Brimbank Habitat Connectivity Plan.
• Continue the next Brimbank Planning Scheme Amendment to apply the Environmental Audit Overlay to potentially contaminated land.
• Review the Brimbank Community Learning Strategy which provides strategic directions for community learning.
• Project manage rehabilitation of a 1.2-kilometre section of Upper Stony Creek in Sunshine North, on behalf of all partners.
This is a Greening The West project.
• Prepare the Brimbank Visitor and Participation Strategy.
• Review implementation of the Sustainable Water Management Strategy.
• Participate in the development of a regional Integrated Transport Strategy.
• Develop the 2018-2028 Waste Management Strategy.
• Review the Brimbank Planning Scheme and Municipal Strategic Statement.
• Progress planning for the Sunshine Health, Wellbeing and Education Precinct and Solomon Heights.

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
The year in review
Message from the Mayor
This Annual Report explains
Brimbank City Council’s performance
in accomplishing the actions outlined
in the
Brimbank Council Plan
2013-2017
(Year 4 – updated 2016).
Council was elected by the community in
October 2016.
The functions and powers of Council are set
out in the
Local Government Act 1989
.
The role of Council includes:
• Setting the strategic direction for Council
and monitoring and improving ongoing
performance
• Managing Council’s assets and resources
responsibly
• Considering the current and future needs of
the local community when making decisions
• Providing accessible, accountable and
transparent government
• Advocating the needs of the Brimbank
community to promote investment by other
spheres of government and the private sector
• Promoting civic participation and delivering
programs, which enhance community health
and wellbeing.
Highlights
The return of democratically elected Councillors
was a significant achievement for the financial
year. It was one of a number of many positive
changes in the history of the City.
We are a very diverse Council with seven women
and four men and from different backgrounds
including Maltese, Vietnamese and Greek.
Significant community building projects
included:
• The opening of the Brimbank Community and
Civic Centre and Sunshine Library
• The opening of the Bowery Theatre and
St Albans Community Centre
• The opening of the Keilor Community Hub
including a new library and customer service
centre
These three facilities are important community
places and provide access to learning, the
arts, meeting spaces and much more. They
help to bring people together and strengthen
community capacity.
Community infrastructure is incredibly
important for providing health, wellbeing,
education and employment opportunities and
outcomes. These facilities help improve the
quality of life for our community.
As a new Council, we are steadfast in our resolve
to engage the community in decision-making
and providing fair and equitable access to
Council services.
We have adopted the strong focus of being
‘Community First’. In developing our first Council
Plan and Annual Budget for 2017-2018, we set
about an extensive community engagement
program to hear from and understand the needs
of the people we represent.
This included over 600 community members
providing their big ideas for Brimbank via our
website, sending in postcards and in face-to
face sessions.
Improving access to Council services was also
a strong focus for the year and we launched
a new mobile responsive website to provide
greater access to Council services. The new
website also included 23 new planning, building,
engineering and waste transactions available
online.
During the year, Council also welcomed Man
lifting cow to Sunshine, a 4.5 metre tall bronze
sculpture by internationally renowned artist
John Kelly who grew up locally.
The sculpture is a wonderful attraction to the
area and highlights the positive transformation
that the City is experiencing.
Advocacy and engagement
Since being elected, this Council has recognised
we play a vital role in advocating the needs of
our community to other levels of government as
well as business and community organisations.
We have been active in advocating across a
range of issues, most notably the need for
community infrastructure in Brimbank. We have
also continued to be a voice for gambling reform
and we have continued our involvement in the
Social Justice Coalition.
Council continued to participate on a number of
external committees and forums to advocate
for improved services, infrastructure, transport,
regional development and sustainability as well
as improved collaboration between industry and
government.
These committees include:
• Ballarat Rail-Line Action Committee (BRAC)
• Brooklyn Community Representative Group
• Calder Highway Improvement Committee
• Community Aviation Consultation Group
• LeadWest Ltd Board
• Level Crossing Removal Project Stakeholder
Liaison Group
• Melbourne Regional Landfill Community
Reference Group
• Metropolitan Local Governments Waste
Management Forum
• Metropolitan Transport Forum
• Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV)
(State Council)
• Ravenhall Prison
• Victorian Local Governance Association (VLGA)
• Western Melbourne Tourism

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
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01 Introduction
I
The year in review
I
Message from the Mayor
Council also facilitated several advisory
committees aimed at delivering value for money
services, as well as improving social, cultural and
economic opportunities for our community and
city. These committees include:
• Audit and Risk Management Committee
• Australia Day Awards Selection Committee
• Brimbank Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Reconciliation Action Plan Consultative
Committee
• Brimbank Arts Advisory Committee
• Brimbank Community Fund Committee
• Brimbank Learning and Employment Steering
Committee (BLESC)
• Brooklyn Industrial Precinct Strategy
Committee
• Chief Executive Officer Performance Review
Committee
• Errington Precinct Master Plan
Implementation (Phase One) Community
Reference Group
• Heritage Advisory Committee
• Municipal Emergency Management Plan
Committee
• Safety Roundtable
• Social Justice Coalition – Strategic
Implementation Group (SIG)
• St Albans Community Centre Consultative
Committee
• Sunshine Leisure Centre Community
Consultative Committee
• Sunshine Town Centre Partnership Group
• Waste Management Strategy Development
Steering Committee
Just as important as advocating for our
community, this Council wants to foster
strong engagement with our community.
The Council Plan and Annual Budget
consultation was a clear message to
our community that they have a voice in
decision-making.
Through our community grants program,
$330,000 is pledged to programs, activities
and events that improve community capacity.
Our In2Sports program subsidises the cost of
playing sport for young people to engage and
connect in their community. Our participation
in International Day Against Homophobia and
Transphobia, NAIDOC Week, and Refugee
Week and involvement in other key community
festivals and events all go towards our goal of
connecting people.
We are proudly diverse, and these are just a
few of the initiatives undertaken by Council
to help the people of Brimbank engage in
community and civic life.
Thank you
This is our first annual report as the new
independent and democratically elected Council
at Brimbank. We are proud to be representing
our community and the City we call home. For
us, there is no place we would rather be.
It is a real privilege to be serving as Mayor.
On behalf of myself and my fellow Councillors,
I sincerely thank the residents and ratepayers
who have elected us to serve the community.
I would also like to thank the executive and
staff at Brimbank and our many partners who
are helping to make Brimbank a thriving and
resilient community.
We have a big task ahead of us, and I am
confident that, working together, we can
make Brimbank shine.
I look forward to what lies ahead as this new
Council puts community first.
Cr John Hedditch
Mayor, Brimbank City Council

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
Chief Executive Officer’s message
On behalf of Brimbank City Council,
I’m pleased to introduce the
Council’s 2016-2017 Annual Report.
As the CEO, the council delegates certain powers to
this position to implement their strategic decisions.
There are also a number of responsibilities set out
in Section 94 A of the
Local Government Act 1989
regarding the role. These include:
• Providing an appropriate organisational
structure for the council
• Quickly implementing council decisions
• Overseeing the daily management of council
operations with respect to the Council Plan
• Implementing and embedding a code of
conduct for council staff
• Providing timely advice to the council
• Safeguarding compliance with relevant
legislation in respect to Council operations.
Highlights
2016-2017 was another year of significant
change for the organisation. Changes included:
• Relocating staff in our ageing offices in Keilor
and Sunshine to the new purpose-built
Brimbank Community and Civic Centre in the
main strip of Sunshine, Hampshire Road
• Refurbishing the former Keilor Offices and
opening the purpose redesigned space as the
Keilor Community Hub
• Opening the Bowery Theatre and St Albans
Community Centre
• Operating within the State Government’s
newly imposed rates cap
• Welcoming an elected Council in November
2017 after eight years under administration.
This Brimbank Community and Civic Centre is the
largest capital investment in the history of the
City to date. A once-in-a-generation project, the
new award-winning facility includes the new
Sunshine library, community meeting spaces, a
new Council Chamber and the consolidation of
Council offices.
Opened in July 2016, the new centre has fast
become a hive of activity and is much loved by
the community. We have also secured a number
of tenant partners which has created an income
stream for Council.
Having the majority of staff located in one
building has had a big impact on efficiency
and has provided savings with staff no longer
required to travel between offices.
The opening of the Brimbank Community and
Civic Centre also provided us the opportunity
to repurpose the former Keilor offices into a
new Community Hub. Significant refurbishment
works have resulted in a great community space
comprising a new much larger Keilor Library,
community meeting and art spaces and a new
Customer Service Centre.
The facility also opened during the year, much
to the delight of the local community. Additional
space in the site is also being fitted out and will
be leased out in the next financial year.
During the year the Bowery Theatre and St
Albans Community Centre was also opened. This
new facility is part of a number of major projects
in St Albans which are transforming the precinct.
The Bowery Theatre is the city’s first 200-seat
performing arts venue. Located within the new
St Albans Community Centre it is a place where
art can be celebrated, ideas discussed, arts
education explored and bold entertainment
experienced.
Rate-capping was introduced for this financial
year. As a Council where almost three-quarters
of our income comes from rates, this has
been an exceptional challenge. Our executive
and management have tackled this with
perseverance and rigour.
Thanks to a commitment to business
transformation and improving service delivery,
savings have been made to help lessen the
impact in this shortfall of revenue.
In August a new mobile responsive website was
launched that included 18 new transactions
across planning, building, engineering and
waste services. The new site has resulted in an
increase of traffic and the online transactions
are allowing our community and customers to
interact with us when it suits them rather than
traditional business hours. Cost to service is also
significantly reduced through this channel.
Our planning permit process is now a fully
digitised end-to-end process; the first of many
changes planned to simplify service delivery.
Projects like this provide a better, more
responsive service to our community.
In November we saw the return of elected
representatives with the formation of a new
Council. This is a significant milestone in the
history of Brimbank and wonderful for the
community.
The new Council is diverse, passionate and
enthusiastic and since being sworn in has
focused on advocacy and engagement to
improve community outcomes. This has been
evidenced by the unprecedented level of
community engagement in the development
of the Council Plan. As an organisation we look
forward to their tenure and working under
their guidance to implement the actions of
the Council Plan that is due to be adopted next
financial year.

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
19
01 Introduction
I
Chief Executive Officer’s message
Organisational performance
Despite the intense change environment the
organisation performed well.
The Annual Budget 2016-2017 had an operating
surplus of $14.5 million. Sustaining an adjusted
underlying surplus is a critical financial strategy
that provides capacity to build new assets and
to renew the $2.2 billion of community assets
under Council’s control.
The operating result for the financial year
ending 30 June 2017 was a surplus of
$44.4 million, against a budgeted surplus of
$14.5 million, showing a favourable variance
of $29.9 million.
The increase in operating surplus is due to:
• 50 per cent of the 2017-2018 Financial
Assistance Grants of $6.75 million, received in
advance in the 2016-2017 financial year
• $4.2 million received for Open Space Public
Initiatives in Sunshine
• $2.27 million additional monetary
contributions were also received due to
higher than expected development in the
municipality and additional capital works
contributions
• $3.5 million additional non-monetary
contributions were vested in Council due
to new subdivisions that were not initially
budgeted
• $2.1 million for net gain on sale of Council
assets over the budgeted amount.
Cash balance for the financial year ended 30
June 2017 was $60.4 million, compared to
budgeted cash balance of $30.2 million.
Business transformation projects in the
organisation included working towards a
master customer database, digitising records
and becoming a paper-independent office and
launching the new website.
Having the majority of staff under one roof
has also improved our effectiveness as an
organisation.
The continued cultural program of being
‘community first’ is working toward providing the
best possible service to our community.
There is much work to be done and the
organisation is continuing to partner with the
community to ensure our services are relevant
and responsive.
Thank you
I would like to acknowledge all the former
administrators for leaving Council in such a
strong position and the new Councillors for
their passion and enthusiasm to create a better
Brimbank.
Our new Council has hit the ground running and
from day one has demonstrated a strong focus
to making sure all Council decisions are made
with a lens of improving the health, wellbeing,
safety and opportunity for our community.
I’d also like to thank our partners, the community
and our staff for their continued commitment to
this wonderful City.
Brimbank is a proud and diverse city and a great
place to live, work and play. As an organisation
we look forward to delivering services, programs
and events that meet the needs and aspirations
of the community.
Helen Morrissey
Interim Chief Executive Officer
Note: Paul Younis left Brimbank on 7 July and
Helen Morrissey took on the position as Interim CEO.

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0
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
30,000
Underlying Surplus / (Deficit) $'000
4,077
26,528
13,787
5,058
565
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
13,787
0
50
100
150
200
250
Working Capital Ratio (%)
145.44
220.1109975
200.66
93.66
117.92
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
20
I Dynamic Centre of the West
Financial summary
The 2016-2017 financial year
results reflect Council’s ongoing
commitment to financial and
infrastructure sustainability as
outlined in Council’s Long Term
Financial Plan.
Financial summary
Council’s financial position continues to remain
sound. Detailed information relating to Council’s
financial performance is included within
the Financial Statements and Performance
Statement sections of this Report.
Council has a healthy balance sheet with
$2.3 billion dollars in assets. These comprise
land, building and other infrastructure assets
such as roads, footpaths and bike paths and
drainage. Council’s balance sheet also shows
that Council has equity of $2.218 billion with a
portion of this allocated to specific reserves.
Operating position
Council achieved a surplus of $44.44 million in
2016-2017. This surplus compares favourably
to the budgeted surplus of $14.5 million. The
adjusted underlying surplus of Council, after
removing non-recurrent capital grants, cash
capital contributions and non-monetary capital
contributions, is a surplus of $26.52 million.
This compares favourably to the expected
target of >0 per cent. Sustaining an adjusted
underlying surplus is a critical financial strategy
that provides capacity to renew the $2.2 billion
of community assets under Council’s control,
and build new infrastructure to meet the
expectations of our growing community.
Liquidity
Cash has increased by 80 per cent from the
prior year mainly due to the Victorian Grants
Commission funding received in advance, receipt
of a capital grant, and additional proceeds of
sale of assets. The working capital ratio, which
assesses Council’s ability to meet current
commitments, is calculated by measuring
Council’s current assets as a percentage of
current liabilities. Council’s result of 219.37 per
cent is an indicator of satisfactory financial
position and exceeds the expected target band
of 100 per cent to 400 per cent.

image
0
10
20
30
40
50
5
15
25
35
45
Debt Ratio (%)
46
41.76
35
42
25
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
42
41.76
0
20
40
60
80
100
10
30
50
70
90
Asset Renewal
76
87
61
64
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
57
76
0 10
20 30
40 50
60 70
80
Rate Concentration (%)
76
69
76
72
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
70
76
76
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
21
01 Introduction
I
Financial summary
Obligations
Council aims to ensure that it is able to maintain
its infrastructure assets at the expected levels,
while at the same time continuing to deliver the
services needed by the community.
At the end of the 2016-2017 year Council’s debt
ratio, which is measured by comparing interest
bearing loans and borrowings to rate revenue,
was 42 per cent, which was within the expected
target band of 20-60 per cent.
Council’s asset renewal ratio, which is measured
by comparing asset renewal expenditure to
depreciation, was 87 per cent, which is slightly
below the expected target band of 90-110 per
cent. This is a significant improvement over
the past few years where capital funding had
been diverted into constructing the Brimbank
Community and Civic Centre.
Stability and efficiency
Council raises a wide range of revenues
including rates, user fees, fines, grants and
contributions. Despite this, Council’s rates
concentration, which compares rate revenue to
adjusted underlying revenue, was 69 per cent
for the 2016-2017 year, which is towards the
top end of the expected target band of 40-80
per cent. Council has focused on broadening
its revenue base for the 2016-2017 year.
This resulted in an average residential rate
per residential assessment of $1588, which
compares favourably to similar councils in the
outer metropolitan area.
Economic factors
Rate capping
The Victorian Government imposed a rate cap
on all Victorian councils of 2.0 per cent for the
2016-2017 year. Brimbank City Council did not
seek a variation to the cap.
Financial Assistance Grants
A freeze on indexation from the Commonwealth
Government’s financial assistance grants
program to local government resulted in a
reduction of $0.35 million per annum over the
period from 2013-2014 to 2017-2018.
State Government landfill levy
The Victorian Government landfill levy increased
by 2.5 per cent in 2016-2017.
Labour cost increases
Wage inflation rates as per Council Enterprise
Bargaining Agreement (EBA 7) of 2.4 per cent
is currently higher than current Consumer Price
Index (CPI) rate of 1.9 per cent.

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Brimbank City Council provides a
range of services and programs that
reflect the needs and expectations
of the community.
The Annual Budget 2016-2017 focused on
delivering value to the community in a rate
capped environment.
It was a financially responsible budget that
aimed at minimising the impact of the constraint
on revenue raising while continuing to deliver
quality projects and services for the Brimbank
community.
Council found further efficiencies of $6.5 million
to meet the Victorian Government’s imposed
2.5 per cent rate cap.
The budget struck a balance between
maintaining current levels of service, reducing
operational costs and reviewing the way some
programs are delivered.
Council’s operations are broad ranging and
include managing roads and infrastructure,
waste and environment services, public
facilities, the community’s wellbeing, and other
services and programs. Community take-up
of the services and programs shows the
importance of these Council functions.
The Council Plan 2013-2017 outlines Council’s
Strategic Directions, which are supported by
a number of other Council strategies, plans
and policies. This includes the Annual Budget
2016-2017, which highlights project priorities
and spending.
Council’s Strategic Objectives are monitored
by a set of service performance indicators and
measures. They offer a corporate framework
for the delivery of services, facilities, support
and advocacy, and for achieving the vision and
objectives outlined in the Brimbank Community
Plan. The Council Plan sets out Council’s key
strategic directions and actions for a four-year
period.
Council’s actions are guided by Victorian and
Australian legislation which supports good
governance and enables Council to responsibly
deliver a community first approach.
Major capital works
During 2016-2017 Council delivered a capital
works program of $57.3 million (including
$4.8 million carried forward from 2015-2016).
Major capital work projects included the
following:
Brimbank Community and Civic Centre
The new $52 million Brimbank Community and
Civic Centre opened its doors on 25 July 2016.
The purpose-built building includes a new
Sunshine Library over two levels, a new
Sunshine Customer Service Centre, a range
of community meeting spaces, and exhibition
spaces.
The Centre also provides new offices for Council
staff previously located across various office
locations around Sunshine and Keilor, as well
as tenant spaces for other businesses.
Construction began in November 2014 and
the centre opened on 25 July 2016, with a
community open day and official opening
on 14 August.
Brimbank Multi-Deck Car Park
The new Brimbank Multi-Deck Car Park,
constructed between George and Dawson
streets in Sunshine, opened for use on 21
September 2016, offering additional, affordable
car parking in the busy Sunshine Town Centre.
The 361 space car park offers 250+ public car
spaces, with the remaining spaces used by
Council staff and tenant partners.
Parking is free for the first two hours. The car
park rate is $2 for 2-4 hours, and $4 for four
hours and more. The car park is open from
5.30am to 10pm, seven days a week.
The car park uses a fully cashless payment
system that requires all payments to be
made by debit card/credit card (payWave).
St Albans Community Centre and the
Bowery Theatre
The new $8.9 million St Albans Community
Centre (STACC) featuring the exciting Bowery
Theatre, was opened to the public on 18 March
2017. The project included a civic entry plaza,
landscaping and site improvements to integrate
the newly refurbished and expanded facility
within the wider, cohesive Errington Precinct.
STACC includes the Bowery Theatre – a
new 200-seat performing arts theatre with
the tagline “Be bold”, named in honour of
internationally recognised performance artist
and designer, the late Leigh Bowery.
The centre’s Atrium was named after former
Mayor and Councillor of Keilor, the late Jack
Sheridan. Through Mr Sheridan’s leadership
as President of the St Albans Community
Cooperative Ltd, the Cooperative contributed
$2.5 million to the redevelopment of STACC.
The Centre was designed after extensive
consultation with key stakeholders and
funded by Council ($5.9 million), the St Albans
Community Co-op ($2.5 million) and the
Victorian Government ($500,000).
Keilor Community Hub
Council completed an upgrade of the former
Keilor Office Building, transforming it into a
mixed-use facility that meets the needs of the
local community.
Works to convert the Keilor Office building to its
new use commenced after Council staff were
relocated to the new Brimbank Community and
Civic Centre in Sunshine in late July 2016. The
new Keilor Hub opened its doors in April 2017.
The refurbished building offers a relocated and
expanded Keilor Library, a customer service
centre, and more and improved community
space, and tenant partner space.
The uses were decided following consultation
in recent years with the Keilor community, local
traders and key stakeholder groups.
The Keilor Community Hub project cost
$2.7 million (excluding GST) and was funded
through Council’s 2016-2017 capital works
budget.
22
I Dynamic Centre of the West
Description of operations

image
Roads, footpaths and pedestrian facilities
Council continued to implement the Road
Management Plan through the delivery of
a $20.58 million road rehabilitation and
$1.51 million traffic management program.
Key highlights included completion of:
• Road pavement rehabilitation work of
26 streets ($12,352,600)
• Road pavement asphalt overlay program
($3,140,000)
• Footpath rehabilitation program ($505,300)
• Pedestrian facilities and missing links –
various locations ($400,000)
• Kerb replacement for property access –
Lois St, St Albans $252,900)
• On-road cycling route program – Old
Calder Highway, Keilor ($100,000)
• Traffic management (road humps) –
various locations ($156,619)
• Construction of roundabouts – George
Street/Theodore Street, St Albans and
Gillespie Road/Kingdom Avenue, Kings Park
($325,900)
• Traffic island and kerb modifications
($258,283)
• Intersection realignment treatments
($182,544)
Continuation of parks, playground and
open space upgrades
Council spent $7.21 million on open space
projects, including the ongoing implementation
of the award-winning Creating Better Parks –
Open Space and Playground Policy and Plan.
Highlights included:
The Suburban Park upgrade program which
saw the:
• Upgrade of Dellbridge Drive Reserve,
Sydenham ($440,000)
• Stage 2 upgrade of Delahey Drive Reserve,
Delahey ($300,000)
• New BMX dirt track at Ardeer Community Park
($50,000)
Neighbourhood Park upgrade program which
saw the completion of:
• Stage 2 of Selwyn Park Master Plan
implementation ($400,000)
• $400,000 for four playground upgrades at
Pioneer Park, Sydenham; Rutherglen Way,
Taylors Lakes; Glenmaggie Drive, St Albans;
and Krambruk Street Reserve, Sunshine West.
Sports facilities
Council continued to invest in upgrades at
sporting facilities across the municipality
and completed a range of projects,
including the following:
• Sportsground reconstruction rolling program
– Larisa Reserve, St Albans ($0.90 million)
• Sports reserve car parking upgrade program –
Green Gully Oval 5 ($0.65 million)
• Sports reserve lighting upgrade program –
JR Parson Reserve ($0.29 million)
• School/Community partnership program –
Floodlighting upgrade at Lionheart Oval 1
and Delahey Soccer Pitch ($0.40 million)
• Sports reserve lighting renewal program
($0.30 million)
• New Sportsground Development Program
($0.10 million)
• Tennis Court resurfacing program (50%
funded) – Overton Lea Courts 1 and 2,
Sydenham and Taylors Lakes Tennis Club
($0.10 million)
• Rolling sportsground irrigation upgrade
program – More Park and Keilor Park
Diamond 2 ($0.10 million)
Town centre works
Council delivered a range of works to improve
amenity, connectivity and ambience in town
centres. This included:
• Sunshine Town Centre – Dawson Street
Precinct upgrade ($2.69 million)
• Keilor Village Activity Centre – shopping
strip upgrade ($0.94 million)
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
23
01 Introduction
I
Description of operations

image
July 2016
• Council opened the new Brimbank Community
and Civic Centre to the public on 25 July.
A community open day was held to officially
open the Brimbank Community and Civic
Centre on 14 August.
• Brimbank City Council was awarded the
inaugural Supporting Tennis – Local
Government Recognition award at the
2016 Victorian Tennis Awards. The award
recognises the Local Government Authority
judged to be the most engaged with, and
supportive of, tennis in their community.
The award category was open to all
Victorian Councils.
August 2016
• Brimbank City Council adopted a planning
scheme amendment C150 that will help guide
the future development of the St Albans
Activity Centre as an attractive, vibrant, safe
area that provides great opportunities for
business, retail, entertainment and housing.
• Council adopted a strategy that will
guide its drive to cement Brimbank as
the economic hub of Melbourne’s west.
The Brimbank Economic Development
Strategy (2016-2020) plays a vital role in
positioning Brimbank for further growth
and development.
• Council launched a new mobile responsive
website with over 20 additional online
transactions for planning, building,
engineering, waste and city compliance
services. The new website was developed
with extensive stakeholder input and can
be updated easily based on community
feedback.
September 2016
• The new Brimbank Multi-Deck Car Park in
Sunshine opened for use on 21 September
2016, providing 361 spaces and affordable
car parking within the Sunshine Town Centre
with free parking for the first two hours.
Council has made sure the car park rates are
affordable.
• The largest energy and greenhouse reduction
project ever undertaken in Brimbank was
completed – with more than 11,600 new
energy efficient lights now in place across
the municipality. This was done as part of
the three-year, $7 million Powering Down
project. The energy efficient lights will cut
energy use by more than 3.5 million kWh and
reduce CO
2
emissions by 3800 tonnes each
year resulting in a saving to ratepayers of
more than $500,000 in electricity costs each
year. Powering Down was funded through a
partnership between Brimbank City Council
and the Australian Government Department
of Industry, Innovation and Science to deliver
environmental benefits and savings to the
Brimbank community.
• Brimbank City Council unveiled a 6-metre
Man lifting cow bronze sculpture on
Hampshire Road, Sunshine, created by
renowned Sunshine-raised international
artist John Kelly who donated his time to this
project to leave a legacy in his home-town.
24
I Dynamic Centre of the West
Significant service achievements 2016-2017

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October 2016
• Brimbank Council elections were held by
postal vote in October 2016. The election
was conducted by the Victorian Electoral
Commission (VEC). All postal votes were to
be mailed by 6pm on Friday 21 October 2016.
November 2016
• The new democratically-elected Brimbank
Council was sworn in and took an oath of
office at a Special Council Meeting on 8
November 2016.
• Council initiated The Giving Tree Program to
help members of the community who might
be struggling during the festive season.
As part of The Giving Tree Program, Council
collected and distributed non-perishable
items to the community, via local agencies,
in the lead up to Christmas to help lessen
the strain.
• Brimbank Libraries participated in 1,000
Books Before School, the first state-wide
program in Australia designed to work with
families to promote early literacy skills and
combat the scourge of adult illiteracy in
communities.
• Brimbank community members attended
a public talk on 23 November, to hear more
about taking action to stop violence against
women. This event was held in support
of White Ribbon Day 25 November – an
international, male-led campaign for the
elimination of men’s violence against women.
• Council invited the community to take part in
the One Million Stars to End Violence Project.
The project originated in Melbourne in 2012
in response to the death of Jill Meagher
and the rising incidence of violence against
women, and had worldwide participation.
Stars made by Brimbank will be displayed as
part of Festival 2018 during the Gold Coast
2018 Commonwealth Games.
December 2016
• Brimbank Disability Expo, held on 1 December
2016, was a great opportunity for local
community members to find out about
services available under the new National
Disability Insurance Scheme which rolls out
across Brimbank from late 2018. This event
was hosted in partnership with the Smith
Family, Sunshine Special Development
School, McKillop Family, Noah’s Ark, Autism
Angels and Department of Health and Human
Services.
• Sydenham Library celebrated its 10th
birthday on 10 December. The celebrations
included giveaways, competitions and special
performances.
• Brimbank Business Breakfast was held on
9 December with guest speaker, Susan
Alberti AC, one of Australia’s pre-eminent
philanthropists.
• Council officially opened its first-ever
Council owned and managed Men’s Shed at
Westvale Community Centre. Westvale Men’s
Shed provides much-needed amenities and
opportunities for men in Brimbank. This
facility will deliver programs and activities
responsive to the needs of men in the
community, including carpentry, gardening,
DIY, cooking, sustainable living, life skills to
support independent living and much more.
Westvale Men’s Shed is run day-to-day by
members, for members, and supported by
Council.
• Council hosted Carols at the Castle with
all monies raised donated to the Brimbank
Community Fund.
January 2017
• The winners of the 2017 Brimbank Australia
Day Awards were announced at a special
ceremony on 23 January attended by award
winners and nominees, their families and
friends. The winners were: Citizen of the Year:
John Puli; Young Citizen of the Year: Selina
Tsang; Community Wellbeing Award: Bharat
(Barry) Palta; Environmental Achievement
Award: Hayden O’Doherty; Cultural
Achievement Award: Thuy Dang; Educator
of the Year: Tim Blunt; Lifetime Achievement
Award: Mary Vella; Essential Services
Excellence: Greg Hitch; and Community
Sport Achievement: Henry McFerran.
• Council kicked off works on more than
$980,000 of upgrade works to improve
functionality in the Keilor Village area while
maintaining and enhancing the history and
character of the village.
• Council presented Outing Disability –
a photographic exhibition, which was part
of the Midsumma Festival and presented
in collaboration with Family Planning NSW,
GoWest and internationally acclaimed
photographer Belinda Mason.
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
25
01 Introduction
I
Significant service achievements 2016-2017

image
February 2017
• Works started on a brand new $1.3 million
soccer pavilion at Ardeer Reserve that would
have two change rooms, a social room,
associated amenities, umpires room, a first
aid room, storage rooms and public amenities.
The need for this facility upgrade was
identified in the Sports Facility Development
Plan, which contains a comprehensive
strategy for the management and
development of sport and recreation
facilities in Brimbank.
• Brimbank Council asked the local community
to have their say about what they would like
to see Council focus on to keep improving
Brimbank through 10 Big Ideas community
consultation sessions from 7 February to
7 March. The feedback will inform Council’s
long-term community plan, the next four
year Council plan as well as budget for next
year.
• Brimbank Council acquired land at 21 McIvor
Road, St Albans, in the heart of the St Albans
Town Centre, to provide additional parking
in the bustling shopping destination. Council
placed a Public Acquisition Overlay (PAO)
on the land in 1989 recognising it was of
strategic importance to the town centre.
• Council teamed up with health promotion
foundation VicHealth to encourage local
residents to sign up for the H30 Challenge
and improve their health. VicHealth’s H30
Challenge encourages Victorians to make a
simple 30-day pledge to replace every sugary
drink they would normally drink, with water.
• Council welcomed a $100,000 Community
Sport Infrastructure Funding announcement
from Cricket Victoria and Sport and
Recreation Victoria. Council will upgrade
the cricket nets at Dempster Park Reserve
in Sunshine North to deliver an innovative
multi-purpose training facility to respond to
community sporting needs.
• The Brimbank Sustainable Living Expo was
held 18 February 2017 with this year’s theme
being social, economic and environmental
sustainability, providing tips and advice on
practical ways to incorporate a sustainable
approach to living.
• Council began to advocate strongly with
the Victorian Government and Federal
government to raise its serious concerns
over the proposed sale of five school sites
in Brimbank as the sites could be used for
education purposes – or they could be used
for sport and active recreation, to get more
people into sport and support our community
to get healthier.
• The 2017 Brimbank Cup was held at Kevin
Flint Memorial Reserve in Cairnlea on 17
and 18 February. A free junior football clinic
hosted by Melbourne City Football Club was
the highlight for kids at the two-day event.
Now in its sixth year, the award-winning
community football event was hosted by
Cairnlea Football Club in 2017, and delivered
in partnership with Brimbank City Council,
Victoria Police, Football Federation Victoria
and Melbourne City Football Club.
• Council began its campaign to stop the
expansion of the Ravenhall tip. On behalf of
the community and the west, Council called
on the Victorian Government to do the right
thing and reject a plan that would triple the
size of a rubbish tip that already has existing
problems.
March 2017
• The Melbourne Food and Wine Festival
returned to Sunshine with the inaugural
Sunshine FOOD Fever held on 31 March.
The event took people on a food journey
that celebrates and reflects the successive
waves of Asian, African and Pacific Island
immigration that make Sunshine one of the
most culturally diverse places in Australia.
• The new $8.9 million St Albans Community
Centre (STACC), featuring the exciting new
Bowery Theatre, opened on 18 March.
The Centre was designed after extensive
consultation with key stakeholders and
funded by Council ($5.9 million), the St
Albans Community Co-op ($2.5 million) and
the Victorian Government ($500,000). The
centre is wholly owned and operated by
Council.
• Council opened the $2.6 million Stage 1
upgrade to the Dawson Street Precinct in
Sunshine on 14 March. The upgrade of the
precinct is a significant, positive impact on the
area.
• Cultural Diversity Week was held from
18 to 26 March with events taking place
at locations across Brimbank, particularly
children’s activities including after school
craft activities and Multilingual Storytimes at
Brimbank Libraries – as well as short films, art
exhibitions and cooking demonstrations.
• Brimbank City Council hosted the
International Women’s Day event in
collaboration with the Brimbank Maribyrnong
Interfaith Network on 8 March. Council’s
vision is to create a gender equitable city
where women live free from violence – we are
committed to building a community where
women and men are equal and respected.
26
I Dynamic Centre of the West
Significant service achievements 2016-2017 (continued)

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April 2017
• The new Keilor Community Hub opened its
doors on 29 April. The Hub was created to
meet the needs of the Keilor community
and includes a Customer Service Centre,
the new contemporary Keilor Library, offers
neighbourhood house and arts programs,
and community meeting rooms.
• Council set up the Brimbank Business Training
Panel to provide essential skills training
to local businesses. The Panel will deliver
training programs in business planning,
marketing, recruitment, time management,
networking, team building, creative
leadership and more.
• In the year that marks 100 years of the
Maternal and Child Health Services in Victoria,
Council opened the new Sunshine Maternal
& Child Health Centre on 18 April. The
modern, user-friendly layout and the facilities
available here allow Council to provide better
services to meet the needs of Brimbank
families requiring important maternal and
child health services. Council has invested
$730,000 in recognition of the increasing
needs of this fast growing community.
• The newly upgraded Selwyn Park opened
to public with more playground equipment,
outdoor gym equipment, new park furniture
and a large outdoor shelter and planting of
about 130 semi-mature trees around the
park. The total cost of the current works is
$400,000.
May 2017
• Brimbank City Council won two awards at the
Parks and Leisure Australia Regional Awards
of Excellence (Vic/Tas Region). Awards were
presented for Brimbank’s Creating Better
Parks Policy and Plan: Green infrastructure
transforming liveability (Leisure and/or Open
Space Planning category) and the 2017
In2Tennis Program (Community Program of
the Year).
• Council hosted a Men’s Health Day at
Westvale Community Centre on 14 June
with guest comedian and personality Dave
Hughes. The Men’s Health Day event, as part
of International Men’s Health Week (12-18
June), aims to promote the importance of
men’s health and wellbeing to local men.
• Council hosted a Reconciliation Walk in
Sunshine on 30 May, to recognise National
Reconciliation Week. A guided tour took place
from Duke Street Community House to walk
approximately 500 metres to Matthews Hill
Reserve.
• Council called on local men to join the
Western Bulldogs’ 10-week Sons of the West
Premiership Season and make their health a
priority.
June 2017
• Community members celebrated the
$400,000 upgrade to the popular Selwyn
Park in Albion at a community day with
entertainment and a sausage sizzle, held on
Saturday 24 June. The upgrade is in line with
the Selwyn Park Master Plan adopted in 2012.
• Council took another step towards ensuring
the best future use of the former Sunshine
Municipal Office site with the adoption of
modified planning scheme amendment
C126 – Part 2, which rezoned the land to
General Residential Zone, and also applied
the Significant Landscape Overlay and
Environment Audit Overlay.
• The Brimbank Community Fund awarded
grants totalling $9,000 to two local charity
organisations working with vulnerable
Brimbank youth. Grant recipients were: The
Youth Junction Incorporated ($4,500 grant);
Better Outcomes Project (B.O.P) – multi
sports program; The Smith Family ($4,500
grant); Stevensville Primary Community Hub
– Bluearth Health.
• A sod turning was held to mark the start of
construction of the highly anticipated Sunvale
Community Park in Sunshine.
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
27
01 Introduction
I
Significant service achievements 2016-2017

image
28
I Dynamic Centre of the West
Strategies, policies and plans adopted
Council adopted the following strategies, policies and plans in 2016-2017.
2016
Creating Better Parks Policy and Plan
Update 2016 (July 2016)
Council’s award winning Creating Better Parks
Policy and Plan was updated to provide a
framework for the ongoing improvement of the
City’s already impressive park network. The plan
identifies a further 156 parks to be upgraded
in future capital works programs subject to
budget considerations.
Road Management Plan Review 2016
(July 2016)
Following a review of the Road Management
Plan (RMP), a revised plan was adopted that
reflected changes to service level standards.
The response and intervention standards set
out in the revised RMP brings Council more into
line with VicRoads standards. The standards
assist in ensuring Council complies with its RMP,
in line with resource allocation and community
expectations.
Brimbank Cycling And Walking Strategy
Update 2016 (August 2016)
The updated strategy takes a fresh look at
improving the City’s cycling and walking network.
The strategy outlines strategic network
improvements that have been indicatively
costed to provide Council with a clear plan for
implementation, and an updated framework,
to guide investment over the next five to seven
years, subject to budget consideration.
Economic Development Strategy 2016-2020
(August 2016)
Building on years of sustained economic
development work by Council the strategy will
play a vital role in positioning Brimbank for
further growth and development and guide
Council’s drive to cement Brimbank as the
economic hub of Melbourne’s west.
Facilities Capital Development Major Policy
(September 2016)
The policy is a transparent and consistent policy
that clearly defines Council and community
group responsibilities towards the capital
development of Council owned or managed
community facilities. It also ensures efficient
and effective use of Council and community
resources to maximise the capital development
and use of Council community facilities.
Community Facilities Hire, Licences
and Leases Agreement Major Policy
(September 2016)
The policy provides direction for the ongoing
allocation and management of community
facilities and ensures fair and equitable access
and use of community facilities to community
groups and residents within Brimbank, in line
with the Community Plan and Council Plan.
It also ensures optimal use of community
facilities to meet community needs.
2017
Councillor Code of Conduct (February 2017)
The Councillor Code of Conduct was reviewed
and adopted by resolution of the Brimbank
City Council on 14 February 2017 and is in
accordance with Section 76C of the
Local
Government Act 1989
.
Disability Action Plan (February 2017)
Council adopted a Disability Action Plan to guide
its work to support people with a disability,
along with their families and carers, and to
improve access and inclusion in Brimbank.
To view these documents or other Council
plans, strategies, policies or guidelines, visit
brimbank.vic.gov.au
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
29
01 Introduction
I
Strategies, policies and plans adopted
I
Major changes
Return to elected representatives
The new Brimbank City Council was elected
by a postal vote held on 22 October 2016.
The Council was sworn in and took an oath of
office at a Special Council Meeting on Tuesday
8 November 2016.
Prior to the 2016 election, Brimbank Council
had been under a period of State-legislated
Administration since November 2009.
Organisational realignment
In November 2016, Council introduced a new
organisational structure aimed at ensuring the
organisation continued to remain agile, flexible
and well placed to respond to the community’s
needs in a changing environment.
The realigned structure will help Council keep
pace with the local community and with what is
happening through the local government sector.
The new and improved services that Council
was introducing during the 2016-2017 year,
in particular the new Brimbank Community
and Civic Centre in Sunshine and the new
St Albans Community Centre to provide
enhanced contemporary service offerings to
the community, also influenced the change in
structure.
The realignment was guided by the following
principles:
• be a
community first
organisation and focus
our attention on things that matter to the
community
• ensure customer interaction is seamless and
it is easy for our customers to work with us
• be financially and ethically responsible
with community funds
• embrace working together and actively
work towards removing organisational silos
• be accountable to the community and to
each other
• minimise risk
• fulfil our legislative and civic responsibilities
• provide opportunities for change and
innovation
• provide flexibility to service delivery
• allow for the inclusion of the new service
offerings of the Brimbank Community and
Civic Centre and St Albans Centre.
The organisational realignment was an
adjustment to reflect changing priorities and
organisational needs and minimise risk. It was
another incremental step in Council’s continuous
improvement journey.
After a process of staff consultation that
commenced in August 2016, the realignment
took place in November 2016.
Major changes
Reconciliation of adopted budget with restructure
Adopted
budget
Restructure
(June 2016) (November 2016)
Net Cost
Net Cost
$’000
$’000
Council and Community Working together
16,846
16,175
Community Wellbeing
33,298
33,092
Urban Design & Infrastructure
80,171
72,930
Sustainable Environments
3,340
3,097
Industry, Economic Development and Strategic Sites
2,398
2,584
Organisational Effectiveness
12,390
12,399
Total services and initiatives
148,443
140,277
Other non-attributable
(16,958)
(8,792)
Deficit before funding sources
131,485
131,485
Funding sources:
Rates & charges
(145,397)
(145,397)
Capital grants
(595)
(595)
Total funding sources
(145,992)
(145,992)
Surplus for the year
(14,507)
(14,507)
For more information on the Council and councillors see page 30.
Resignation of CEO
On 31 May 2017 Brimbank City Council Chief
Executive Officer Paul Younis announced
his resignation in order to take up the role
of Deputy Secretary Asset and Network
Development at Transport for Victoria. He left
the Council’s senior position on 7 July after seven
years at Brimbank City Council. Helen Morrissey,
Director Corporate and Community Relations,
was appointed Interim CEO until a permanent
appointment is made.

image
HARVESTER
GRASSLANDS
HORSESHOE BEND
TAYLORS
30
I Dynamic Centre of the West
The new Brimbank City Council was
elected by a postal vote held on
22 October 2016. The Council was
sworn in and took an oath of office
at a Special Council Meeting on
Tuesday 8 November 2016.
Prior to the 2016 election, Brimbank Council
had been under a period of State-legislated
Administration since November 2009.
The newly elected Council is comprised of 11
Councillors elected from one, two-councillor
ward and three, three-councillor wards.
The 11 Councillors are the elected
representatives of all residents and ratepayers
across Brimbank. They have responsibility
for setting the strategic direction for the
municipality, policy development, identifying
service standards and monitoring performance
across the organisation.
Our Council
About the Councillors
Grasslands Ward
Cr Lucinda Congreve
Date elected: 22 October 2016
Cr Congreve is an active member of the
community and happy to be raising her family
in Brimbank. She believes Brimbank’s greatest
strength is its rich and diverse mix of cultures.
Cr Congreve was motivated to run for Council
by her experience of having her first child in
2015 and her determination to ensure adequate
services are available to families, along with
family friendly spaces, transport, infrastructure
and public safety.
Committees
• Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV)
State Council
• Audit and Risk Management Committee
E CrCongreve@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0428 887 195
Cr Victoria Borg
Date elected: 22 October 2016
Cr Borg is proud to have grown up in Brimbank,
having lived here since emigrating from Malta in
1972. She is committed to building strong and
trusting relationships between Council and the
community and to representing the people of
Brimbank with fairness and integrity.
Cr Borg aims to increase community involvement
with Council, to support mental health and
educational services and increased research
into youth disengagement and acculturation.
Committees
• Brimbank Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Reconciliation Action Plan Consultative
Committee
• Brimbank Learning and Employment Steering
Committee (BLESC)
• Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) State
Council (alternate)
• St Albans Community Centre Consultative
Committee
E CrBorg@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0429 365 527
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
31
01 Introduction
I
Our Council
I
About the Council
I
About the Councillors
Cr Duyen Anh Pham
Date elected: 22 October 2016
Cr Pham was motivated to run for Council
because of her passion for the Brimbank
community.
She believes Brimbank’s greatest strength
is its multicultural diversity. Cr Pham enjoys
volunteering and wants to support local residents
and community groups. Her aims include
increasing multicultural events in Brimbank,
encouraging participation and striving for greater
community involvement in decision-making.
Committees
• Metropolitan Transport Forum
• Errington Precinct Master Plan
Implementation (Phase One) Community
Reference Group
E CrPham@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0429 657 643
Harvester Ward
Cr John Hedditch (Mayor)
Date elected: 22 October 2016
Cr Hedditch believes Brimbank’s greatest
strengths are its people and the vibrant
community networks that make it such a great
place to live. As a resident of Sunshine for more
than 30 years, Cr Hedditch was driven to run
for Council by his desire to help make the world
a better place for future generations. His aims
are to foster a Community First Council that is
collaborative, fair and in favour of a greener,
more sustainable approach to development.
Committees
• Australia Day Awards Selection Committee
• Chief Executive Officer Performance Review
Committee
• Brooklyn Community Representative Group
• LeadWest Ltd Board
• Social Justice Coalition – Strategic
Implementation Group (SIG)
• Sunshine Leisure Centre Community
Consultative Committee
E CrHedditch@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0428 811 580
Cr Sam David JP
Date elected: 22 October 2016
Previous terms: March 1997 to September 2009
Cr David is a long-time resident of Brimbank,
former Councillor and Mayor, and active member
of many several community groups. He believes
Brimbank’s greatest strength is its rich diversity.
Cr David is concerned about housing availability,
affordability and employment; and is committed
to assisting senior citizens groups and
supporting kids to get involved in sport.
Committees
• Brooklyn Community Representative Group
• Brimbank Community Fund Committee
• Sunshine Town Centre Partnership Group
E CrDavid@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0429 355 239
About the Council
Councillors act as members of Council and govern on behalf of the citizens of Brimbank.
Brimbank City Council operates under the
requirements of the
Local Government Act
1989
. Brimbank City Council has an obligation to
achieve best value for its community and
stakeholders and to ensure the community
receives the most benefit from available
resources.
The Council Plan guides future planning in
Brimbank and establishes priorities for action.
Council’s annual planning process involves:
• Engaging with and seeking input from the
community
• Analysing social, political, economic and
natural environment factors and influences
setting the strategic objectives of the Council
• Developing strategies to achieve the
objectives
• Establishing strategic indicators for
monitoring the achievement of the objectives
• Determining financial and non-financial
resource requirements
• Coordinating the implementation of
strategies, and
• Monitoring, reporting, evaluating and
improving performance.
The Councillors are guided in their decision
making by legislation and a range of Council
policies, including, but not limited to:
Local Government Act 1989
Planning and Environment Act 1987
Road Management Act 2004
Council Plan 2013-2017
Community Plan 2009-2030
Long Term Financial Plan 2016-2026
Brimbank Planning Scheme
General Local Law 2008
Governance (Major Policy Consultation)
No. 3 2014
Governance (Meeting Procedure)
Local Law No. 1 2015
Council plans, strategies and policies
are available to view on the website,
brimbank.vic.gov.au
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32
I Dynamic Centre of the West
Cr Kim Thien Truong
Date elected: 22 October 2016
Cr Truong is a proud resident of Brimbank with
a history of volunteering in the local community
and fundraising to support children in need.
She believes Brimbank’s strengths lie in the
community’s diversity and ability of people from
different cultures to live harmoniously together.
Cr Truong is motivated to speak on behalf of the
community. She hopes to raise awareness about
important issues such as the environment,
family violence, housing affordability, transport,
productivity, sustainability and liveability.
Committees
• Brooklyn Community Representative Group
• Brooklyn Industrial Precinct Strategy
Committee
• Safety Roundtable
• Victorian Local Governance Association
(VLGA)
E CrTruong@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0429 637 601
Harvester Ward (continued)
Horseshoe Bend Ward
Cr Virginia Tachos
Date elected: 22 October 2016
A proud history of working in the local
community and advocacy led Cr Tachos to
run for Council. She believes Brimbank is a
destination for many young families to start
their dreams and aspirations. Cr Tachos’
priorities include building strong, sustainable
communities and listening to the needs of the
community. She hopes to achieve a focus on
people, improved services, and efficiencies, as
well as improving inclusion, reviewing planning
schemes, and promoting healthy outcomes of
the community.
Committees
• Community Aviation Consultation Group
• Former Keilor Library Community Consultative
Committee
• LeadWest Ltd Board (alternate)
• Melbourne Regional Landfill Community
Reference Group (December 2016-February
2017)
• Waste Management Strategy Development
Steering Committee
E CrTachos@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0428 915 671
Cr Daniel Allan
Date elected: 22 October 2016
Cr Allan has lived in Kealba for 20 years. He
believes Brimbank’s greatest strength is the
community’s vibrancy and willingness to come
together. Cr Allan has been an active volunteer
and involved with community events for many
years. He was motivated to run for Council by
his passion to help make Brimbank the best
it can be. He is particularly passionate about
encouraging young people to be more active in
the community.
Committees
• Western Melbourne Tourism
• Brimbank Arts Advisory Committee
• Former Keilor Library Community Consultative
Committee
• Keilor Interim Artefacts Committee
E CrAllan@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0429 857 339
About the Councillors (continued)
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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
33
01 Introduction
I
About the Councillors
Taylors Ward
Cr Margaret Giudice
Date elected: 22 October 2016
Previous terms: March 2000 to September 2009
Cr Giudice believes the fact that more than 160
different languages are spoken in Brimbank
and that the community lives harmoniously
within such cultural diversity, is an example
to the world. Cr Giudice was born in Brimbank
and has raised her family here, and maintains
strong connections. Her past experience as a
Councillor of Brimbank has given her a strong
understanding of community needs. She was
motivated to run for Council by her drive to help
people. Her aim is to pave the way for future
generations to enjoy living and working in
Brimbank, as much as she does.
Committees
• Audit and Risk Management Committee
• Chief Executive Officer Performance Review
Committee
• Level Crossing Removal Project Stakeholder
Liaison Group
• Waste Management Strategy Development
Steering Committee
E CrGiudice@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0428 846 647
Cr Bruce Lancashire
Date elected: 22 October 2016
Cr Lancashire believes Brimbank’s rich
cultural and linguistic diversity is not just
a significant social asset but an important
economic benefit in a world that is becoming
increasingly interconnected. He has been a
long-term resident of Brimbank, having raised
his three sons here, and has a strong belief that
Brimbank’s youth will ensure our community’s
future is in good hands. He is determined to
make the most of Brimbank’s assets to benefit
its residents.
Committees
• Ballarat Rail-Line Action Committee (BRAC)
• Calder Highway Improvement Committee
• Heritage Advisory Committee
• Melbourne Regional Landfill Community
Reference Group (February-June 2017)
• Metropolitan Local Governments Waste
Management Forum
• Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV)
Planning Committee
• Waste Management Strategy Development
Steering Committee (Chair)
E CrLancashire@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0429 637 689
Cr Georgina Papafotiou (Deputy Mayor)
Date elected: 22 October 2016
Cr Papafotiou believes Brimbank is a wonderful
city in which to live, work, study and invest.
As a resident of Taylors Ward for more than
36 years, Cr Papafotiou was motivated to
run for Council by her passion for making a
difference in her community and celebrating
its successes. Her aim is to build connections
across Brimbank’s diverse community and to
encourage opportunities for growth and a
sustainable future. As a dedicated advocate for
Victims of Crime, she would like to work with the
State Government to review current policies and
legislation to support victims.
Committees
• Chief Executive Officer Performance Review
Committee
• Former Keilor Library Community Consultative
Committee
• Municipal Emergency Management Plan
Committee
• Ravenhall Prison
E CrPapafotiou@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0429 727 192
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34
I Dynamic Centre of the West
02
Our people

image
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
35
02 Our people
I
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2017
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2017
Stuart Menzies
Director City Development
Stuart Menzies is an urban planner with over
20 years’ experience. Stuart joined Brimbank
City Council in 2005 and was appointed to the
position of Director City Development in June
2013. Prior to working with Brimbank, Stuart
held management roles at Yarra Ranges Shire
Council and Nillumbik Shire Council, and has
worked in China with Australian Volunteers
International advising on sustainability policy
and social impact assessment.
Stuart is a Vice President – Local Government
of the Planning Institute of Australia’s Victorian
Committee.
Bachelor of Applied Science (Planning),
Graduate Diploma in Public Policy,
Masters of Environmental Studies.
Kath Brackett
Director Community Wellbeing
Kath is an experienced senior manager who has
worked in a variety of roles in local government
for the past 20 years. Prior to this, she worked
in the not-for-profit and peak NGO sectors. She
is also an experienced non-executive board
director.
Kath has a strong commitment to social justice
and a passion for local democracy and engaging
local communities.
Bachelor of Social Work and a Certificate in
Human Resource Management, Masters of
Arts (Social Policy), Graduate of the Australian
Institute of Company Directors (GAICD).
Helen Morrissey
Director Corporate and Community Relations
With over 30 years’ experience in local
government Helen joined Brimbank in November
2010. Previously Helen was the General
Manager of Corporate Services at Maribyrnong
City Council. Helen has worked in a variety of
management roles in both community services
and corporate areas at Darebin City Council.
Helen has been in the position of Interim Chief
Executive Officer of Brimbank City Council since
7 July 2017 and has been appointed until a
permanent appointment is made.
Graduate Diploma in Social Science, Diploma
Human Service Research & Evaluation,
Certificate of Marketing Practice.
Neil Whiteside
Director Infrastructure and City Services
Neil Whiteside has worked in local government
for over 20 years in various management roles.
In October 2015 Neil was appointed to
the position of Director Infrastructure and
Environment (now Infrastructure and City
Services). He previously held the position of
Director Community Wellbeing from June 2012,
and prior to that held the position of Group
Manager Operations at Council from January
2008. Prior to joining Brimbank, Neil held several
management positions at Whittlesea City
Council.
Bachelor of Education/Environmental Science,
Masters in Environmental Science, Williamson
Leadership Fellow. Neil is currently completing
a Masters of Public Policy and Management.
Paul Younis
CEO
Paul Younis was appointed Chief Executive
Officer of Brimbank City Council in 2015. He has
over 20 years of experience in a range of senior
management positions within local government
and the private sector.
Paul commenced with the City of Brimbank
in 2010 as Director Infrastructure and
Environment. During this time Paul was
seconded for six months as Acting Chief
Executive Officer of Buloke Shire Council in
Western Victoria. Before joining Brimbank, Paul
was Chief Executive Officer of Corangamite
Shire Council, where he had previously held
the position of Director Infrastructure and
Development. Along with experience in the
water sector, Paul has also worked at consulting
engineering companies based in Frankston and
Mornington.
Bachelor of Civil Engineering, Post Graduate
qualifications in Law, Graduate Diploma in
Business.

image
>
CEO
Paul Younis
Director Community
Wellbeing
Kath Brackett
Director
Infrastructure
and City Services
Neil Whiteside
Director
Corporate and
Community Relations
Helen Morrissey
Manager
Engineering
Services
Adrian Ashford
Manager
Urban Design
Adrian Gray
Group Manager
Operations
Tom Razmovski
r
Manager People
and Performance
Helen Lawless
Manager
Financial Services
Andrew Brae
Manager
Governance
Melanie Fleer
Chief Financial
Strategist
Shane Marr
Manager
Property
Trent Prince
Manager
Asset Services
Dominic Di Martino
Manager
Customer Service
Paul Tate
Director
City Development
Stuart Menzies
Manager
Community Learning
and Participation
Christine McAllister
Manager Community
Planning, Culture
and Development
Lynley Dumble
Manager
Community Care
John MacDonagh
Manager
Leisure Services
Ashley Fleming
Manager Building
Services and
Environmental Health
Ashley Hansen
Manager
City Strategy
Leanne Deans
Manager City
Planning
Kristen Gilbert
Acting Manager
City Compliance
John Petroro
Manager
Environment
Matthew Aquilina
Manager
Engineering
Services
Matthew Aquilina
Manager
Media and
Communications
Rebecca Solomon
Manager
Business Support
Shane Buckley
36
I Dynamic Centre of the West
Organisation structure at 30 June 2017

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
37
02 Our people
I
Organisation structure at 30 June 2017
I
Workforce profile
Workforce profile
As at 30 June 2017, Council employed 1325 people (837 full-time equivalent), which is a slight increase from 2015-2016.
Overall workforce turnover decreased slightly to 11.54 per cent, a 0.4 percentage point decrease on 2015-2016. Headcount increased by four for the
year, with full-time equivalent (FTE) figures increasing by 10 overall. The average age of Council’s workforce is 45.98 years. Over 17 per cent of Council
employees are in the 61-plus age group, with these staff predominantly employed as School Crossing Supervisors and within Council’s Operations Centre.
Council staff
Age groups
Age Group Female Male Total 2017
< 21
26 19
45
21 - 25
45 46
91
26 - 30
62 35
97
31 - 35
67 36
103
36 - 40
77 66
143
41 - 45
87 55
142
46 - 50
105 64
169
51 - 55
92 52
144
56 - 60
102 58
160
Brimbank total employment status
Status
2016- 2017
< 21
45
21 - 25
91
26 - 30
97
31 - 35
103
36 - 40
143
41 - 45
142
46 - 50
169
51 - 55
144
56 - 60
160
A summary of the number
Division
Status
Female
Male
Total
CEO & Councillors
Full-Time
4
1
5
Part-Time
0
0
0
Casual
0
0
0
Corporate & Community Relations
Full-Time
45
31
76
Part-Time
25
2
27
Casual
3
1
4
Infrastructure & Environment
Full-Time
19
242
261
Part-Time
10
5
15
Casual
0
0
0
City Development
Full-Time
35
38
73
Part-Time
61
70
131
Casual
11
13
24
Community Wellbeing
Full-Time
107
41
148
Part-Time
306
68
374
Casual
140
47
187
Brimbank Total
766
559
1325

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38
I Dynamic Centre of the West
A summary of the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) Council staff by organisational structure, employment type and gender is set out below.
Status
Gender
CEO &
Councillors
City
Development
Community
Wellbeing
Corporate &
Community
Relations
Infrastructure
& Environment
Total
Casual
Female
0
2
19
0
0
21
Male
0
3
6
0
0
9
Full-time
Female
4
35
104
45
19
207
Male
1
38
40
31
242
352
Part-time
Female
0
19
161
16
6
202
Male
0
16
25
2
3
46
Total
5
113
355
94
270
837
Note:
Casuals recorded as .14 of FTE. Council has 215 casuals that are contracted to five hours per week, which brings FTE for casuals down.
A summary of the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff categorised by employment classification (band) and gender is set out below.
Employment classification (Band)
Female FTE Male FTE
Total
Band 1
25
13
38
Band 2
21
106
127
Band 3
59
71
130
Band 4
67
16
83
Band 5
82
56
138
Band 6
74
38
112
Band 7
42
49
91
Band 8
21
24
45
Other
39
34
73
Total
430
407
837
Workforce profile (continued)

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
39
02 Our people
I
Workforce profile
I
Equal Opportunity
I
Other staff matters
Brimbank has an internal e-learning Equal
Opportunity (EO) training program that focuses
on the policies and procedures relating to EO.
In addition, field-based employees who do
not have access to a computer receive formal
classroom training on EO. For both platforms,
employees are required to complete an
assessment in addition to signing a statement
of attestation.
Brimbank has benchmarked that employees are
required to receive EO training every two-to
three years with training on both platforms
completed in late 2014. The online training
module will be re-released to all PC users to
complete in the second-half of 2017; field-based
staff will receive formal training from September
2017. Council promotes equity and diversity outcomes
to ensure an inclusive workplace culture and EO,
and recognises the importance of equity and
diversity and optimises our service design and
delivery to the broader community.
The Brimbank Leadership Essentials Program
includes a module on Diversity @ Work. In this
program the focus is on unconscious bias,
gender, diversity and inclusion, inter-cultural
communication, disability awareness and inter
generational awareness. This module is also
made available more broadly to all staff via the
corporate training calendar.
Brimbank City Council was selected to be part
of the pilot for a program called ‘Listen, Learn,
and Lead Gender Equity program’ coordinated
by Local Government Victoria. The Executive
Management Team endorsed a number of
recommendations designed to support gender
equity in the workplace focusing on:
• Gender equity at management level
• Upskilling and networking
• Leading by example
• Supporting flexible arrangements.
Equal Opportunity Other staff matters
Preventing men’s violence against
women and children
In 2016-2017, Council actively worked to
advance gender equity and prevent violence
against women and children in the community
by implementing the
Brimbank City Council’s
Plan to Prevent Men’s Violence Against Women
,
2015-2019
.
Achievements:
Council continued to support the following
strategic alliances and partnerships aimed
to prevent violence against women and
children and advance gender equity: the
Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV)
Preventing Violence Against Women Network,
the Western Integrated Family Violence
Committee (WIFVC) and Preventing Violence
Together (PVT) partnership.
Youth Services participated in the Partners
in Prevention State-wide Network and
the Respectful Relationships Education
Sub-Group both run by Domestic Violence
Resource Centre.
Leisure Services participated in the
Preventing Violence Together (PVT) Gender
Equity and Sports Practice Group.
Council’s Policy, Advocacy and Research Unit
staff collected and interpreted data on family
violence for evidence-based planning.
Council’s Policy, Advocacy and Research Unit
staff provided sex disaggregated data to
inform community indicators.
Youth Services established two young
mums’ groups after consultation with 90
young mothers. The groups have supported
members to become linked to the community,
and with one another, and supported the
development of how other services, such
as Maternal and Child Health, support the
specific needs of young mothers.
Youth Services team commenced meetings
with the Gender Equity Intern at Maribyrnong
City Council to scope opportunity to complete
a gender diversity access audit of the Visy
Cares Hub.
Youth Services reviewed the Brimbank Online
Youth Directory and updated information
about specialist services for young women
living in Brimbank.
The Maternal and Child Health Service made
assessment in relation to family violence at
each consultation and provided information
and advice to support each client based on
their needs. Staff members also referred
clients to specialist family violence services.
Library Services organised three Robogals
sessions to encourage girls to get interested
in Science, Technology, Engineering and
Mathematics courses. 36 participants
attended these sessions.
Library Services organised Coderdojo
sessions once every fortnight at Sunshine
Library to encourage girls to get interested
in Science, Technology, and Engineering
and Mathematics courses. Approximately
14 participants attended each session.
Council, in partnership with Brotherhood
of St Laurence and Small Business Victoria,
implemented the Stepping Stones Small
Business Program for refugee, asylum seeker
and migrant women. The program aims to
educate participants about money, and build
their understanding of how to start a small
business in Australia. It also aims to teach
business and government leaders about how
micro-businesses help refugee and migrant
women, and why communities need more of
these small businesses. A total of 20 Brimbank
women received support and assistance.
Council provided support to Sunshine
Business Association (SBA) and Maurice
Blackburn Lawyers to organise the healthy
relationship breakfast aimed to promote
awareness of violence against women among
local business leaders in Brimbank.
Cairnlea Community Hub, in partnership
with Kangna Indian Women’s Network,
delivered Creating Happy and Healthy Family
Relationships program sessions once every
month. The program aims to break cycles
of isolation and loneliness within families
disrupted by violence, to support happy
and healthy relationships, and to promote
wellbeing and lifelong learning. Approximately
10-12 people attended each session.
Council hosted the Elder Abuse Awareness
Day morning tea as part of the senior’s forum.
Council, in partnership with Brimbank
Maribyrnong Interfaith Network and
CommUnity Plus, hosted the International
Women’s Day forum to celebrate women’s
leadership and explore the role faith plays
for women in leadership. Approximately 70
community members attended the event.
Council, in partnership with Joining the Dots,
Brimbank Maribyrnong Interfaith Network
and New Hope Foundation, supported female
community members to coordinate and
facilitate a community welcome dinner as
part of Refugee Week.
Sydenham Neighbourhood House, in
partnership with Kangna Indian Women’s
Network, ran a monthly session as part of the
healthy relationships program for men from
the sub-continent of India. The program aims
to raise awareness and prevent family violence.
Approximately 15 men attended each session.
Council, through its community grants
program, provided funding to 12 local
organisations to implement initiatives aimed
to prevent violence against women and
advance gender equity.
Youth Services, in partnership with South
Sudanese Association of Victoria and Victoria
University, implemented the New Change
program that provided support for South
Sudanese young women to work through
issues impacting on their lives including
domestic violence.

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
Youth Services continued to provide support
and counselling services for young women
experiencing gender-based violence.
Youth Services, in partnership with
Copperfield College, implemented the Girls
Making Change program that aims to enhance
health and wellbeing literacy for young
women in Brimbank.
Youth Services worked in partnership with
the Department of Education and Training
staff to assist in the local roll-out of the
Respectful Relationships in Schools program
– a recommendation of the Royal Commission
into Family Violence.
Council, in partnership with cohealth,
Maribyrnong City Council, Hobsons Bay City
Council, Moonee Valley City Council and CASA
West, delivered respectful relationships
sessions. The sessions adopted the human
rights strength-based approach to inform
people with an intellectual disability about
respectful relationships and to train them to
deliver similar trainings to other people with
disabilities.
Maternal Child Health Service partnered with
Grace – Western Melbourne Families Against
Domestic Violence, to provide care packages
for women experiencing family violence.
Council, in partnership with HealthWest, IPC
Health, cohealth and Women’s Health West,
implemented the Working Together with
Men project that aims to engage men living in
Brimbank to take an active role in preventing
violence against women and advancing
gender equity.
Leisure Services, in partnership with Women’s
Health West, Melton, Wyndham, Maribyrnong,
Moonee Valley, Hobsons Bay and Melbourne
councils, was successful in the Sport and
Recreation Victoria’s regional planning
grants for a project aimed to increase female
participation in sports.
Council implemented the Brimbank
Community Leadership Program that aims
to provide an opportunity for community
members to build and strengthen their
capacity in community leadership and
participation. Thirty-four community
members participated in the program with
equal representation of female and male
participants.
Youth Services and the Arts and Culture
Unit provided support to the young women
participating in the New Change program to
develop their skills in program management.
14 women applied for the Council’s Neighbour
Day Grants and hosted successful events at
their respective local areas.
Council implemented the community
governance training program that aims to
build the capacity of community groups in
planning, operations and decision-making. 335
people participated in the program with equal
representation of female and male participants.
Council implemented the Dynamic
Young Citizens of Brimbank project that
aims to increase the opportunities for
children in Brimbank to participate in the
local community, increase their social
connectedness and sense of pride, and allow
them to have meaningful input into local
decisions that affect them. Eighty-eight
children from four local primary schools
participated in the project.
Council took part in the Local Government
Victoria Listen, Learn and Lead Gender Equity
Program. The project provided an opportunity
for the Chief Executive Officer to develop a
deeper level of insight into the workplace
barriers for women that need to be tackled to
improve gender equity in the workplace.
Council continues to provide support to staff
members who are victims of family violence
through provision of leave and the Employee
Assistance Program.
Leisure Services completed a female facilities
audit of sport facilities across Brimbank. The
audit information will be used to develop an
implementation plan to improve the facilities
in order to provide greater opportunities for
females to participate in sports.
Council continues to facilitate gender balance
of council-led committees and reference
groups.
Brimbank White Ribbon Working Group
organised a White Ribbon Forum for staff
and community members with guest
speakers who presented on the role of men
in preventing violence against women and
advancing gender equity. The forum was
attended by approximately 40 people.
Brimbank White Ribbon Working Group, in
partnership with Brimbank Social Club, hosted a
White Ribbon lunch for staff. The guest speaker
presented on the role of men in preventing
violence against women. The lunch was
attended by approximately 50 staff members.
Neighbourhood House staff and volunteers
attended training on identifying family
violence and providing appropriate support
to victims. The training was coordinated by
Network West.
Council staff and community members
participated in the One Million Stars project
aimed to end violence against women.
Approximately 3,500 stars were woven. The
stars will contribute toward the One Million
Stars project that will be installed during
2018 Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast.
Council ran a communication campaign to
promote the Preventing Violence Together
(PVT) 16 days Activist Challenge internally
and across the municipality.
Library Services displayed Safe Steps posters
in all Council libraries and neighbourhood
houses. Safe Steps is a 24/7 state-wide
family violence response centre for
intervention, support and advocacy.
Council distributed over 1000 men’s and
women’s family violence help cards at
community events.
Youth Services and the Arts and Culture Unit
provided support to South Sudanese young
women participating in the New Change
program to create a spoken word video
titled “Breaking News” aimed at addressing
misrepresentation of Sudanese-Australians
in the media.
Learning and development
Employee development is a key focus for
Council, with a suite of programs offered
across the organisation to meet behavioural,
technical and compliance obligations as well as
enhance the knowledge, skill, experience and
competency of our employees.
Development is delivered formally, self-paced
or via Brimbank’s own e-learning tool bTrain.
Modules are made available to staff to learn at
their own pace, at their convenience.
Modules on bTrain include Equal Opportunity,
Fraud and Corruption Awareness, Code of
Conduct and Privacy.
A total of 96 corporate training calendar courses
were coordinated in 2016-2017 with 228
sessions and a total of 2,806 participants.
Learning programs offered took into
consideration departmental, interpersonal and
organisational needs to help employees meet
Council’s objectives.
Some of the key programs included:
• Front Line Adaptive Communication – Dealing
with Aggressive Customers
• PRINCE2 Project Management
• Microsoft Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint)
• Communicating with Others – the PEDO Model
• Corporate Induction
• Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)
• Effective Time Management
• Occupational Health and Safety (OHS)
• Emotional Intelligence
• Crucial Conversations
• Records Manager
• Business Writing Skills
• Diversity @ Work
• Team Management Profiling
• Conducting Annual Discussions
Other staff matters (continued)

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
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02 Our people
I
Other staff matters
Council recognises the importance of all new
staff receiving a comprehensive induction to
Council on commencement, ensuring they
understand:
• Council functions, processes and policies
• The requirements of their role and the
functions of the directorate where they work
• The policies and procedures that apply to
their behaviour and performance in the
workplace.
To assist with this, all staff must complete a
three-step Brimbank Induction Program. This
includes the commencement kit provided with
the letter of offer, the first day departmental
induction checklist and attendance to
Brimbank’s formal corporate induction.
As part of the on boarding process, new
employees were given access to ‘Welcome to
Brimbank’ — an interactive program designed
to provide newly recruited employees with
information on Brimbank City Council, our
community first culture and the benefits of
working at Brimbank.
The formal, one-day Corporate Induction
Program continued to run on a bi-monthly
basis and was revamped to ensure a more
interactive, informative and engaging session
to formally welcome new employees to Council.
The corporate induction, coupled with Council’s
eLearning modules, aims to pass on vital
information to new employees as well as meet
statutory compliance obligations.
Leadership Essentials
The Brimbank Leadership Essentials program
is targeted at new or aspirational leaders,
and has been designed to have an immediate
impact on individuals as it brings theory and
work related experience together. It is practical,
contemporary and focuses on both personal and
professional development.
The program looks at the real issues occurring
in the workplace and assists participants
in discovering relevant solutions to these
issues. The program confirms the need for
a professional and productive workplace
and aims to provide ways to create a more
positive culture. It also assists participants in
establishing strategies for the implementation
of their learning back into their workplaces.
The program provides an opportunity to gain
in-depth knowledge of business functions
and build foundational skills to integrate these
functions into the organisation, examine new
techniques and technologies for driving results,
identifying problems and formulating solutions,
and adapting to change and expand capacity to
lead cross-functional initiatives.
The program has been aligned so that upon
completion, participating staff gain a Diploma
of Leadership Management through Victoria
University. Base units are facilitated formally
and core electives are completed using
Recognition of Prior Learning.
Upon commencement of the program in March
2014, 77 employees have completed the
program and 76 employees have successfully
obtained the Diploma of Management. The
Leadership Essentials Program underwent a
realignment to adhere to new government
standards and a group of 14 coordinators
participated in the new program in March 2017.
Occupational Health and Safety (OHS)
Council is committed to a positive and safe
work culture and the 2016-2017 year has
seen noteworthy improvements. Particular
improvement has been made across several
areas which include the OHS Management
System (OHSMS), training, governance and
strategic planning.
The OHS Strategic plan is now in its second year,
and we continue to achieve targets. The strategic
direction for OHS was organised to deliver safe,
precise and predictable outcomes that our
stakeholders and the community demand.
Significant achievements have included:
• Completion of the core OHS Management
System.
• Revised quarterly and annual reporting
delivering accurate streamlined data.
• Exhaustive completion of the organisation’s
OHS Training Needs Analysis. This has served
to provide accurate training requirements,
which has included capturing all compliance
training.
• Completion of risk registers.
• Consolidation of the Executive Safety Council
as the key body providing corporate oversight
of OHS.
Key performance indicators and workers’ compensation
Year
Lost time
injuries
WorkCover
claims
Days lost due to
workplace injury
2016 - 2017
13
14
1163
2015-2016
15
27
1443
2014-2015
21
34
986
2013-2014
24
37
973
2012-2013
18
30
1568
2011-2012
31
46
1346
2010-2011
21
34
1302
2009-2010
28
53
1481
2008-2009
25
36
1942
Days lost by division
City Development
287
Community Wellbeing
244
Infrastructure & Environment
632
Corporate & Community Relations
0
Total days lost
1163
The total number of days lost is made up of the
following:
• New claims in the reporting period 2016-2017
• Days lost to existing claims
There has been a steady improvement in
the reduction of Lost Time Injuries (LTIs) and
their effects from the previous year, i.e. a 20
per cent reduction in actual LTIs, 51 per cent
reduction in claims and 20 per cent reduction
in the number of days lost to claims. This has
arisen due to Council’s continued efforts and
hard work with its early intervention initiatives
of onsite physiotherapy consultancy, off-site
physiotherapy treatment, and working closely
with managers to facilitate immediate return to
work programs

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
03
Our
performance

image
Time horizon
Medium term
Short term
Planning
Reporting
Timing
Council plan
• Strategic objectives
• Strategies
• Strategic indicators
Stakeholder
and
community
engagement
Annual report
• Report of
operations
• Financial
statements
• Performance
statement
Strategic resource plan
• Financial statements
• Statements of
non-nancial resources
Budget
• Services and initiatives
• Service outcome indicators
• Major initiatives
• Financial statements
Jan – Jun
Feb – Jun
Mar – Jun
Jul – Sep
Year End
Accountability
Audited Statements
30 years +
Long Term Planning
{
Community Plan
Medium Term Planning
and Sustainability
4 years
{
Council Plan
12 months
Short Term Planning
{
Budget
{
Community vision, Mission, Values,
Long term financial plan, Asset management plan
Strategic objectives, Strategies, Strategic indicators,
Strategic resource plan, (incl, Standard statements)
Standard statements, Activities & initiatives,
Key strategic activities, Other information
Standard statements, Financial statements,
Performance statement
Brimbank’s planning framework
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
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03 Our performance
I
Planning and Accountability Framework
The
Local Government Act 1989
requires councils to prepare the
following planning and reporting
documents:
• A Council Plan within the six months
after each general election or by 30 June,
whichever is later
• A Strategic Resource Plan for a period of
at least four years and include this in the
Council Plan
• A Budget for each financial year
• An Annual Report in respect of each
financial year.
The diagram shows the relationships between
the key planning and reporting documents
that make up the planning and accountability
framework for Local Government. It also shows
that there are opportunities for community and
stakeholder input and feedback at each stage of
the planning and reporting cycle.
Brimbank’s integrated planning framework
ensures that strategic and financial resources
are aligned in order to deliver the Council Plan.
Engaging with and consulting the community is
a vital element of this process.
Brimbank’s planning framework
Planning and Accountability Framework
Brimbank Community Plan
The
Brimbank Community Plan 2009-2030
(updated 2013) describes the community’s
vision and priorities for the next 20 years and
establishes a shared basis for joint planning,
service delivery and advocacy.
The Community Plan was first endorsed by
Council in 2009. The Community Plan is Council’s
primary planning document and all other Council
plans and activities relate to this document.
The plan has been shaped by a community
consultation process that explored the
community’s understanding of the strengths
within the community and the opportunities for
improvement, and came up with a vision for the
future.
Council Plan 2013-2017
The Council Plan is one of Brimbank’s primary
strategic documents. It is directly aligned to the
Community Plan and provides a four-year medium
term outlook. The Council Plan informs the
development of Council’s Annual Plan and Budget.
The
Council Plan 2013-2017
(updated 2016)
outlines Council’s strategic directions and
focus for the next four years. It also details
the objectives and key actions that are to be
completed over the financial year in order to
achieve these directions, and the measures to
monitor performance in delivering services to
the community and fulfill Council’s commitment
to ongoing improvement.
It is the 2016-2017 performance that is reported
in this Annual Report.
Council Budget
The Annual Budget documents the financial
resources required to implement the key
activities identified in the Council Plan, which
will be undertaken in order to achieve Council’s
strategic objectives.
Community engagement and
consultation
The community’s involvement in planning
and policy development, service delivery and
advocacy is supported by increasing community
awareness and education and opportunities
for community members to be consulted and
involved in all aspects of community life. The
information gathered is also used to develop the
strategies and commitments in the Council Plan.

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
Council Plan Strategic Objectives
Council Plan
The
Council Plan 2013-2017
includes strategic objectives, strategies for achieving these for the four-year period, strategic indicators for monitoring
achievement of the strategic objectives and a strategic resource plan. The following are the six strategic objectives as detailed in the Council Plan.
01
Council and the
Community Working
Together
Brimbank City Council
is committed to working in close
collaboration with the community
Council facilitates a wide cross-section of community participation, including ‘hard to reach’ groups, through a variety of forums and partnerships to
better engage, develop, represent, and communicate with our diverse community. Brimbank City Council will fulfil its statutory and legal obligations to the
community and manage the municipality in a financially sustainable manner to meet the current needs of our community and those of future generations.
• Developing leadership in the community
• Governing responsibly and community advocacy
• Keeping the community informed and involved
• Working in partnership
• Responsible financial management.
02
Community
Wellbeing
Brimbank City Council is committed
to creating an enhanced quality of
healthy and active community life
Our rich cultures are celebrated, embraced and connected to the broader community. Within a strong foundation of social justice, Council is committed
to the provision of affordable services and community infrastructure that builds healthy people and communities through education, recreation, arts
and culture, and sport.
• Creating connected, supported and welcoming communities
• Celebrating our history, creativity and diversity
• Creating healthy, safe communities
• Creating a community of lifelong learners
• Building economically sustainable communities.
03
Urban Design and
Infrastructure
Brimbank City Council
is committed to fostering strong
pride for residents and visitors
Council creates an urban environment that is attractive, clean and green and which improves living and housing, business and recreational
opportunities, demonstrates environmental leadership and fosters a sustainable economy.
Council is also committed to developing its five town centres and its many smaller urban villages, across the municipality, as a network of safe, attractive,
vibrant, liveable and prosperous places that provide accessible retail, business, community, social activities, employment and residential opportunities.
• Contributing to an accessible, connected city
• Enhancing the character and identity of our city
• Providing a range of places for people to play, relax and meet
• Ensure that there are sustainable plans for the management of Brimbank’s physical assets.

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Annual Report 2016-2017 I
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03 Our performance
I
Council Plan Strategic Objectives
04
Sustainable
Environments
Brimbank City Council is committed to
promoting the long-term sustainable
development of the municipality
Council will do this by facilitating a dynamic and accessible environment that is supported by a healthy and informed community that enjoys rich
environmental characteristics within the municipality. Council is committed to environmental protection, planning for sustainable developments,
improving the sustainability of our building stock, and reducing our ecological footprint.
• Reducing the city’s ecological footprint
• Protecting and enhancing our natural environment
• Fostering sustainable urban development.
05
Industry and
Economic Development
and Strategic Sites
Brimbank City Council is committed to
providing local employment and business
development opportunities whilst also
ensuring that such activities do not have a
detrimental impact on local communities
The municipality contains a range of strategic sites (outside of town centres or urban villages) that, due to their location, size, environment or current
or past use, can greatly assist Council achieve its economic, social or environmental objectives.
• Promoting and advocating for appropriate recognition, development and use of Brimbank’s strategic sites
• Increasing local employment, business, office and economic development
• Facilitating future industrial, commercial or residential development at strategic sites.
06
Organisational
Effectiveness
Brimbank City Council is committed to
the ongoing delivery of a broad range
of services that meet the needs
and aspirations of the diverse and
growing Brimbank community
Guided by the Australian Business Excellence Framework, the ongoing development of our staff is a critical element to our continuous improvement
of service delivery. We will continue to benchmark services to ensure best practice, lead by example, and implement best practice services to the
community.
• Developing our people
• Creating a high performance organisation through continuous improvement.

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
Performance
Council’s performance for the 2016-2017 year has been reported against each strategic objective to demonstrate
how Council is performing in achieving the
Council Plan 2013-2017
.
Performance has been measured as follows:
• Results achieved in relation to the strategic indicators in the Council Plan
• Progress in relation to the major initiatives identified in the Budget
• Services funded in the Budget and the persons or sections of the community who are provided those services
• Results against the prescribed service performance indicators and measures.
Strategic Objective 1:
Council and the Community Working Together
Strategic indicators
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Strategic indicator/measure
Result
Comments
Developing leadership in the community
Actively promote the roles and skills of Community Resource
Members across relevant Council work areas to ensure their
participation in local projects.
-
The Community Resource Member model has been reviewed
and alternative opportunities for civic participation will be
explored in 2017-2018.
Governing responsibly and community advocacy
Resident perception of Council performance on lobbying on
the behalf of the community.
54
This is 3 points lower than 2015-2016 and equal to the state
average.
Resident perception that Council is generally heading in the
right direction.
59
This is 2 points lower than 2015-2016, though significantly
higher (6 points) than the state average.
Keeping the community informed and involved
Resident perception of Council performance on community
consultation and engagement.
55
This is 1 point higher than 2015-2016 and equal to the state
average.
Resident perception of Council performance on informing
the community.
56
This is 2 points lower than 2015-2016, and 3 points lower
than the state average.
Working in partnership
Number of meetings with the Sunshine, Sydenham and
St Albans Town Centre Partnership Groups.
2
Meeting numbers are lower as the St Albans Partnership
Group dissolved in June 2016 and the Sydenham Partnership
Group in 2015. Work is underway to re-establish the St Albans
Partnership Group.
Responsible financial management
Debt servicing ratio.
1.20%
Target achieved.
Adjusted Working Capital Ratio.
315.66%
Target achieved.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2016-2017 Budget for the year.
Major Initiatives
Progress
Deliver Council’s Community Governance training program to community groups,
small not-for-profit organisations and interested individuals across Brimbank to
support good governance practice in community organisations.
Council delivered 20 Community Governance training
sessions to 335 participants.

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03 Our performance
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Strategic Objective 1: Council and the community working together
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2016-2017 Budget and the persons or sections of the
community who are provided the service.
Service
Description
Net Cost
Actual Budget
Favourable/
(Unfavourable) $’000
Governance Governance
supports Council’s formal decision-making processes and structures, including
coordination of the Council Meeting cycle and delegations, with oversight and coordination of
legislative governance for Council, including requirements of the
Local Government Act 1989
,
privacy, Freedom of Information and geographic place naming.
Governance provides strategic and operational risk services, in-house legal services, insurance
and claims management, and coordinates business continuity planning and reviews.
It delivers a fraud awareness program for the organisation and is responsible for protected
disclosure reporting. The department also facilitates Council’s internal audit function and
supports the Audit and Risk Management Committee.
5,050 4,518
(532)
Media and
Communications
Media and Communications
gather and communicate information through a variety of channels
to reach all corners of the community.
These channels include mainstream and local media, corporate publications and posters, advice
and consultation, website and social media, advertising, speeches and events.
By promoting Brimbank through various channels the community is kept up-to-date with
information relating to where they live, work and socialis.
2,339 2,576
237
Financial
Services
Financial Services
provides a fully integrated financial service and support function across
Council. It is supported by two core units – Finance and Business Support.
Finance
is responsible for calculating and collecting annual rates and charges as well as
valuing every property within the municipality; and for coordinating the preparation of the
annual financial statements, monitoring Council’s cash and investments to maximise interest
earnings, paying suppliers and ensure compliance with legislation, and accounting standards.
Business Support
coordinates the Annual Budget and long-term financial plan. It also
provides financial analysis of Council’s business to help support decisions, maintains and
support Council’s financial systems and provides training to staff, and maintains policies and
procedures.
Management of strategic policies, procedures and guidelines for Council’s purchases of
goods and services, providing a centralised process for all public tenders, and assistance
with procurement matters across all service units providing procurement advice, governance
on procurement activities and where required conduct procurement activities on behalf of
Council.
5,393 5,182
(211)
Customer
Support
Customer Support
provides professional services through a number of contact channels including
over the phone, face-to-face and written communications to best meet the needs of customers at
the initial point of contact.
Seeking out, monitoring and analysing customer feedback to better understand the customer
experience and to drive service delivery improvement programs.
Information management
services are also provided which includes the registration,
management, storage and retrieval of all information received by Council in accordance with
legislative requirements.
All service processes are designed around optimal use of digital practices and consideration of
technology opportunities.
3,845 3,899
54

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
Service indicator/measure
Results
Material Variations
2015
2016
2017
Governance
Transparency
Council decisions made at meetings closed to the public
[Number of Council resolutions made at ordinary or special
meetings of Council, or at meetings of a special committee
consisting only of Councillors, closed to the public/number of
Council resolutions made at ordinary or special meetings of
Council or at meetings of a special committee consisting only
of Councillors ] x100
.63%
.34%
1.83% This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Consultation and engagement
Satisfaction with community consultation and engagement
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how Council has
performed on community consultation and engagement]
58
54
55 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Attendance
Councillor attendance at council meetings
[The sum of the number of Councillors who attended each
ordinary and special Council meeting/(number of ordinary and
special Council meetings) × (number of Councillors elected at
the last Council general election)] x100
94.20% 93.65% 98.53% This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Service cost
Cost of governance
[Direct cost of the governance service/number of
Councillors elected at the last Council general election]
$161,679.00 $172,219.55 $98,521.38 The decrease in the cost of
governance result reflects the
new governance arrangements in
2016-2017; the end of the period
of administration and the swearing
in of 11 Councillors on 8 November
2016. In addition, there were no
CEO recruitment or performance
costs in 2016-2017.
Satisfaction
Satisfaction with Council decisions
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how Council has
performed in making decisions in the interest of the community]
55
57
56 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
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03 Our performance
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Strategic indicators
Strategic Objective 2: Community Wellbeing
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Strategic indicator/measure
Result
Comments
Creating connected, supported and welcoming
communities
Resident perception about Council’s general town planning
policy.
58
This is 2 points higher than 2015-2016 and 5 points higher
than the state average.
Celebrating our history, creativity and diversity
Resident perception about Council performance on
community and cultural activities.
64
This is 3 points lower than 2015-2016 and 5 points lower
than the state average.
Creating a community of lifelong learners
Resident perception about Council performance on art
centres and libraries.
72
This is 4 points higher than 2015-2016 with 66% of
residents rating performance ‘good’ or ‘very good.’ The score
is 3 points higher than the state average.
Building economically sustainable communities
Resident perception about Council performance on business
and community development and tourism.
58
This is 1 point higher than 2015-2016 and 3 points lower
than the state average.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2016-2017 budget for the year.
Major Initiatives
Progress
Develop a new Brimbank Community and Civic Centre in Sunshine including a new
library.
The Brimbank Community and Civic Centre and Library were
opened on 25 July 2017.
Start construction of the St Albans Community and Performing Arts Centre.
The St Albans Community Centre, which features the Bowery
Theatre performance space, opened on 18 March 2017.
Conduct Community Leadership Training.
Thirty-four participants from diverse communities
completed the Community Leadership Training Program.
Develop and operate the Brimbank Education Development Centre.
The Education Development Centre will be established at
Visy Hub in Sunshine in 2017-2018.
Develop and operate a new Keilor Library as part of the Keilor Office redevelopment
project.
The Keilor Community Hub, which incorporates the Keilor
Library, opened in April 2017.
Tender and implement a new Library Management System.
Tender process has been completed. The Library
Management System will be implemented in 2017-2018.
Strategic Objective 2:
Community Wellbeing

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2016-2017 Budget and the persons or sections of the
community who are provided the service.
Service
Description
Net Cost
Actual Budget
Favourable/
(Unfavourable) $’000
Community
Planning,
Culture and
Development
Community Planning
, Culture and Development undertakes a range of initiatives, partnerships, policy
and strategy development to enhance community health and wellbeing and promote cultural development
across the following four department units. The department is responsible for the preparation of the Council
Plan, Community Plan and reporting.
Arts & Cultural Development
unit manages our two main arts centres – St Albans Community Centre and
Bowery Theatre. It commissions public and visual artworks, and creates arts spaces within the municipality
by developing and managing exhibition venues, studios, shop fronts, performance and rehearsal spaces.
Brimbank is proud to own an art collection that has grown over the years, and partners with the local arts
community in creative projects that are accessible and enjoyable for people living in Brimbank and beyond.
This unit also develops policy positions and strategies around arts and cultural development.
Diversity & Inclusion
promotes social inclusion and access through the delivery of the Metro Access
program, language services, seniors development, Indigenous and cultural awareness programs, and delivery
of Council’s Annual Community Grant Program.
Connected Communities
facilitates Council’s community engagement, capacity building and social
inclusion through establishing governance and consultation structures and builds community capacity
through community leadership programs such as the Community Governance Training Program.
Policy Advocacy and Research
monitor and analyse data and research to understand the community
demographic profile as well as emerging social issues and trends impacting the community. The unit
develops health and social policy and strategy and convenes the Brimbank Social Justice Coalition.
5,674 6,055
382
Lifelong
Learning &
Community
Participation
Lifelong Learning & Community Participation
ensure lifelong learning is accessible to all age groups and
abilities through a diverse range of library services and a network of community centres and neighbourhood
houses.
Library services
operate in five libraries as well as an online library and home library service. The service
includes quality collections, computers and wireless internet. It supports customers with research, study and
information, and provides places for study, reading and socialising. Library programs support lifelong learning
and help foster a culture of reading and literacy.
Council’s five
Neighbourhood Houses
provides community meeting spaces, capacity building activities and
programs for the community such as volunteering opportunities and community lunches, delivers programs
that include short courses and workshops, coordinates the Brimbank Neighbourhood Houses Strategic
Partnership Agreement and enters into Collaborative Partnership Agreements with community groups and
organisations.
9,960 9,769
(192)
Community Care Community Care
provides a wide range of services that support older people, people living with a disability,
families and youth.
Ageing & Inclusion
supports and encourages older people, and people with a disability, to maintain and
enhance their physical, social and emotional well-being by accessing in-home and community-based services
provided by Council. Services such as domestic assistance, personal and respite care, social support and
planned activity groups, delivered meals, community transport and maintenance help older residents live a
fulfilling life, independently.
Families & Early Years
provides a range of services for children and families in the community through the
Early Education & Care and Maternal & Child Health teams. Families’ health and wellbeing is well supported
with playgroups, kindergartens, family day care and other child care services operating throughout the
municipality. Maternal and Child Health services are available at eight locations, providing health and
wellbeing information for parents and children aged from 0-5 years, and intensive support for vulnerable
families experiencing parenting difficulties.
Youth Services
offers a number of services to guide young people through their personal development
and encourages them to participate positively in community life through support, counselling and youth
programs that strengthen and build resilience in young people The unit also fosters partnerships with other
local services that support young people.
10,679 12,030
1,351

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
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03 Our performance
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Strategic Objective 2: Community Wellbeing
Service
Description
Net Cost
Actual Budget
Favourable/
(Unfavourable) $’000
Leisure and
Community
Facilities
Leisure and Community Facilities
manage Sport & Recreation, Community Facilities, Leisure & Community
Facilities Planning & Policy and major leisure facilities including the Sunshine and St Albans Leisure Centres,
the Keilor Basketball & Netball Stadium and Keilor Public Golf Course.
Sports & Recreation
develops and deliver leisure, sport and recreation projects and programs to meet the
diverse needs of the community.
This includes more than 180 outdoor sports areas including 46 sports pavilions, 95 playing fields, pitches
and greens and over 40 outdoor courts. The team supports clubs in capacity building, business planning and
funding applications, and takes regular bookings for the Keilor Park Synthetic Sports Fields and Synthetic
Athletics Track.
Community Facilities
supports, guides and develops community groups such as Scouts, Girl Guides and
Senior Citizens by managing venue tenancy agreements and bookings at Council’s 35 halls and meeting
rooms available for regular hire, casual events and functions.
Leisure & Community Facilities Planning & Policy
manages the four major leisure facilities in Brimbank
– Keilor Basketball and Netball Stadium, St Albans Leisure Centre, Sunshine Leisure Centre and Keilor Public
Golf Course. These centres provide a diverse and affordable range of health, fitness and community activities
and programs that offer the community opportunities to participate in physical activity and a safe place for
social interaction.
Research and analyses trends are undertaken to detect issues and barriers that may impact the local leisure
industry in Brimbank, and identifies Capital Works Projects that provide continuous improvements in leisure
and recreation services and facilities.
5,023 5,238
216
The following statement provides the results of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation of
material variations.
Service indicator/measure
Results
Material Variations
2015
2016
2017
Aquatic Facilities
Service standard
Health inspections of aquatic facilities
[Number of authorised officer inspections of Council aquatic
facilities/ number of Council aquatic facilities]
4.00
4.00
4.00 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Service standard
Reportable safety incidents at aquatic facilities
[Number of WorkSafe reportable aquatic facility safety
incidents]
0
0
0
This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Service cost
Cost of indoor aquatic facilities
[Direct cost of indoor aquatic facilities less income received/
number of visits to indoor aquatic facilities]
$4.83
$3.86
$4.11 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Utilisation
Utilisation of aquatic facilities
[Number of visits to aquatic facilities/ municipal population]
2.78
2.85
2.80 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
Service indicator/measure
Results
Material Variations
2015
2016
2017
Home and Community Care
Timeliness
Time taken to commence the HACC service
[Number of days between the referral of a new client and
commencement of HACC service/Number of new clients who
have received a HACC service]
NA
13.57 days
NA Reporting on HACC ceased on 1 July
2016 due to the introduction of the
Commonwealth Government’s NDIS
and CHSP programs.
Service standard
Compliance with Community Care Common Standards
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how Council has
performed on community consultation and engagement]
100.00% 100.00%
NA Reporting on HACC ceased on 1 July
2016 due to the introduction of the
Commonwealth Government’s NDIS
and CHSP programs.
Service cost
Cost of domestic care service
[Cost of the domestic care service/Hours of domestic care
service delivered]
NA
$56.08
NA Reporting on HACC ceased on 1 July
2016 due to the introduction of the
Commonwealth Government’s NDIS
and CHSP programs.
Cost of personal care service
[Cost of the personal care service/Hours of personal care
service delivered]
NA
$56.08
NA Reporting on HACC ceased on 1 July
2016 due to the introduction of the
Commonwealth Government’s NDIS
and CHSP programs.
Cost of respite care service
[Cost of the respite care service/Hours of respite care service
delivered]
NA
$56.08
NA Reporting on HACC ceased on 1 July
2016 due to the introduction of the
Commonwealth Government’s NDIS
and CHSP programs.
Participation
Participation in HACC service
[Number of people that received a HACC service/Municipal
target population for HACC services] x100
12.81%
5.41%
NA Reporting on HACC ceased on 1 July
2016 due to the introduction of the
Commonwealth Government’s NDIS
and CHSP programs.
Participation in HACC service by Culturally and Linguistically
Diverse (CALD) people
[Number of CALD people who receive a HACC service/Municipal
target population in relation to CALD people for HACC services] x100
12.20%
4.95%
NA Reporting on HACC ceased on 1 July
2016 due to the introduction of the
Commonwealth Government’s NDIS
and CHSP programs.
Libraries
Utilisation
Library collection usage
[Number of library collection item loans/Number of library
collection items]
4.96
13.57 days
4.34 Library collection usage increased
in 2016-17; this reflects increased
borrowing, particularly at the newly
rebuilt Sunshine library.
Resource standard
Standard of library collection
[Number of library collection items purchased in the last 5
years/Number of library collection items] x100
73.60% 69.43% 72.32% This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Service cost
Cost of library service
[Direct cost of the library service/Number of visits]
$5.91
$6.39
$5.64 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Participation
Active library members
[Number of active library members/Municipal population] x100] 16.54%
14.07%
15.61% This result falls within the range
expected by Council.

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
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03 Our performance
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Strategic Objective 2: Community Wellbeing
Service indicator/measure
Results
Material Variations
2015
2016
2017
Maternal and Child Health (MCH
Satisfaction
Participation in first MCH home visit
{Number of first MCH home visits/Number of birth notifications
received] x100
100.30% 107.06% 109.31% This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Service standard
Infant enrolments in MCH service
[Number of infants enrolled in the MCH service (from birth
notifications received)/Number of birth notifications received]
x100
94.20% 100.00% 100.00% This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Cost of the MCH service
[Cost of the MCH service/Hours worked by MCH nurses]
NA
$83.69
$86.79 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Participation
Participation in the MCH service
[Number of children who attend the MCH service at least once (in
the year)/Number of children enrolled in the MCH service] x100
72.46% 72.90% 69.82% This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Participation in MCH service by Aboriginal children
[Number of Aboriginal children who attend the MCH service at
least once (in the year)/Number of Aboriginal children enrolled
in the MCH service] x100
68.29% 53.76% 58.33% The level of participation for this
community increased during this
period.

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
Strategic indicators
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Strategic indicator/measure
Result
Comments
Enhancing the character and identity of our city
Resident perception of Council performance around
condition of local streets and footpaths.
Resident perception of Council performance on the
appearance of public areas.
55 61
This is 1 point higher than 2015-2016 and 2 points lower
than the state average.
This is the same result as 2015-2016 and 2 points above
target.
Providing a range of places for people to play,
relax and meet
Resident perception of Council performance on
recreational facilities
64
This is 1 point higher than 2015-2016 and 1 point below
target.
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2016-2017 budget for the year.
Major Initiatives
Progress
Implement the Road Asset Management Plan through the delivery of a $18.4
million road rehabilitation and upgrade program.
The Road Rehabilitation and Upgrade Program was delivered
to 94.6% completion rate.
Strategic Objective 3:
Urban Design and Infrastructure

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
55
03 Our performance
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Strategic Objective 3: Urban Design and Infrastructure
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2016-2017 Budget and the persons or sections of the
community who are provided the service.
Service
Description
Net Cost
Actual Budget
Favourable/
(Unfavourable) $’000
Engineering
Services
Engineering Services
ensures that Brimbank is a safe, liveable and attractive place to live and work. This is
achieved through planning, design, construction, maintenance and renewal/disposal of local roads, drainage
systems and other vital infrastructure.
2,986 3,129
143
Environment Environment
engages and encourages the community to value Brimbank’s natural areas and understand
local environmental impacts in an effort to becoming a more environmentally sustainable city.
This is achieved by providing leadership and education while providing direction and coordination in resource
efficiency measures including integrated water management, climate change mitigation and adaptation; and
community engagement in the conservation, management and restoration of Brimbank’s natural areas including
grasslands, waterways and rocky escarpments and manages issues associated with former landfill sites.
2,313 2,551
238
Asset and
Property
Services
Asset and Property Services
provides a comprehensive range of services to improve the operational
performance of Council’s infrastructure assets. This includes providing information, support and strategic
advice to the community; coordinating Council’s annual Capital Works Program; and keeping up-to-date with
spatial mapping, analysis and predictive modelling innovations.
1,510 1,451
(59)
Urban Design
Urban Design
undertakes tree planting in streets and main roads, along with landscaping and other amenity
improvements projects for parks, activity centres, and off-road and on-road shared user trails. This work
ensures Brimbank’s community spaces are well designed and cared for.
3,202 3,415
213
Operations
Operations
oversee Fleet Services, Park Services, Roads and Cleansing, Waste Services, Pedestrian Facility
Services and Emergency Management.
Truck, plant and vehicle fleets are purchased responsibly and maintained through
Fleet Services
, which
ensures they are compliant with all legislative requirements.
Parks, sportsgrounds and the outdoor spaces surrounding Council-owned facilities are maintained by
Park Services
.
Road and drainage is managed by
Roads and Cleansing
in accordance with Council’s Road Asset
Management Plan, and are responsible for the overall cleanliness of Council land.
Waste Services
organises the community’s weekly kerbside waste collection and fortnightly recycling and
green waste collections. It also manages Council’s Resource Recovery Centre and delivers an annual hard
waste collection service to residents.
Pedestrian Facilities Services
program and implement Council’s annual footpath and concrete works
rehabilitation program.
Emergency Management
coordinates the use of Council resources for emergency response and recovery in
accordance with
Emergency Management Act 1986
&
2013
, including coordination of a Municipal Emergency
Management Planning Committee; and development and maintenance of the Municipal Emergency
Management Plan.
45,932 47,034
1,102
Facilities &
Major Projects
Facilities & Major Projects
manages Council’s vast property portfolio, with activities that includes fire
services, heating and cooling, electrical, plumbing, vandalism and graffiti removal, and security and hall
keeping requirements on Council facilities; the Facilities Asset Management Program within Council’s Capital
Works Program; and lease negotiations with tenants.
13,197 13,748
551
Building
Services and
Environmental
Health
Building Services and Environmental Health
implements legislation through education, advice and
enforcement to ensure a safe and high standard of public health is maintained across the City of Brimbank.
This includes enforcing the
Building Act 1993
,
Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008
,
Food Act 1984
, and
Tobacco Act 1987
&
Environment Protection Act 1970
. It also issues and inspects building permits and
manages customer requests to ensure the safety of the built environment within Brimbank.
1,186 1,601
415

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I Dynamic Centre of the West
The following statement provides the results of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation of
material variations.
Service indicator/measure
Results
Material Variations
2015
2016
2017
Roads
Satisfaction
Sealed local road requests
[Number of sealed local road requests/Kilometres of sealed
local roads ] x100
56.29
42.62
49.70 Brimbank City Council endeavours
to respond to all residents’ requests
for sealed local roads within the
approved requirements of the
Road Asset Management Plan. The
number of requests for 2016/2017
is very similar with that of the
previous 12 months (2015/2016).
Condition
Sealed local roads below the intervention level
[Number of kilometres of sealed local roads below the renewal
intervention level set by Council/Kilometres of sealed local
roads] x100
89.63% 81.91% 83.38% This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Service cost
Cost of sealed local road reconstruction [Direct cost of sealed
local road reconstruction/Square metres of sealed local roads
reconstructed]
$94.66
$85.83
$87.24 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Service cost
Cost of sealed local road resealing
[Direct cost of sealed local road resealing/Square metres of
sealed local roads resealed]
$28.91
$25.29
$25.08 Brimbank City Council undertakes
all road resealing works via
contracts, which are awarded
following a competitive public
tender process. The cost is
indicative of continued competitive
market conditions in the road
construction industry.
Satisfaction
Satisfaction with sealed local roads
[Community satisfaction rating out of 100 with how Council has
performed on the condition of sealed local roads]
60.00
58.00
58.00 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Waste Collection
Satisfaction
Kerbside bin collection requests
[Number of kerbside garbage and recycling bin collection
requests/Number of kerbside bin collection households] x1000
239.86
202.62
194.34 Brimbank City Council endeavours to
deliver an effective, cost efficient bin
collection service for the community.
The bin collection service includes
replacement of damaged bins, repair
of broken bins, and the collection
and disposal of missed bins from
residential properties within the
municipality. There was a significant
reduction in ‘bin not emptied’
requests resulting in an improved
result this financial year.
Quality
Service standard
Kerbside collection bins missed
[Number of kerbside garbage and recycling collection bins
missed/Number of scheduled kerbside garbage and recycling
collection bin lifts] x10,000
12.16
10.62
11.92 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.

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Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2016-2017 I
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03 Our performance
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Strategic Objective 3: Urban Design and Infrastructure
Service indicator/measure
Results
Material Variations
2015
2016
2017
Cost
Service cost
Cost of kerbside garbage bin collection service
[Direct cost of the kerbside garbage bin collection service/
Number of kerbside garbage collection bins]
$104.18 $106.17 $105.89 This result falls within the range
expected by Council.
Service cost
Cost of kerbside recyclables bin collection service
[Direct cost of the kerbside recyclables bin collection service/
Number of kerbside recyclables collection bins]
$29.05
$11.54
$7.97 Brimbank City Council endeavours
to deliver an effective, cost efficient
kerbside recyclables collection
service for our community. The
kerbside recyclables collection
service provided includes the
collection and processing of
recyclable material collected from
residential properties within
the municipality. There was a
significant reduction in cost for the
service this financial year due to an
increase in the rebate for recyclable
material provided by our processing
contractor.
Waste diversion
Kerbside collection waste diverted from landfill
[Weight of recyclables and green organics collected from
kerbside bins/Weight of garbage, recyclables and green
organics collected from kerbside bins] x100
37.98% 38.80% 40.08% This result falls within the range
expected by Council.

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I Dynamic Centre of the West