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Resilient
Brimbank
Framework
2018 - 2022

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2 Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022
Why is
strengthening
resilience in
Brimbank
important?

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Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022 3
A resilient Brimbank is a socially cohesive and
connected Brimbank.
The Brimbank Council Plan 2017-2021 Vision is
Brimbank – vibrant, harmonious and welcoming, a
great place to live, work and grow
. The Council Plan
also identifies ‘Building Community Resilience’ as one
of four Principles which underpin the core of Council’s
work and decisions now and into the future.

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4 Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022
Resilient communities look after each other in good
times and challenging times. Shocks and stresses can
test community resilience sometimes. Shocks and
stresses may include violent extremist behaviour;
cyber shock; alcohol and drug abuse; safety, health
and wellbeing issues; gambling losses; costs of living;
unemployment and social isolation. The Brimbank
community is strengthened when individuals, groups
and businesses help and support each other to adapt,
survive and thrive in response to these types of
events.
Some groups within Brimbank may be more vulnerable
during and after shocks and stresses than others.
Groups which may be particularly vulnerable include
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples;
people from culturally and linguistically diverse
backgrounds, especially refugees; Lesbian, Gay,
Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer (LGBTIQ)
community members; children and young people; older
people; people with ongoing health, including mental
health conditions; those who are homeless or at risk
of homelessness and those who are experiencing
socio-economic disadvantage or unemployment.
Some people may be vulnerable in a number of the
above areas and so are at increased risk eg women
with children fleeing family violence and at risk of
homelessness and socio economic disadvantage.
The community impact of these shocks and stresses
can be softened through high levels of social cohesion
supported by:
• neighbourhood, intergenerational and family
connections
• links between community groups, institutions and
services
• great public spaces
• opportunities for lifelong learning and employment
• a sustainable environment
• secure housing
• inclusive and sustainable buildings.
The Resilient Melbourne Strategy is a metropolitan
strategy to strengthen Melbourne's communities
against current and future acute shocks and chronic
stresses which may affect community resilience
and liveability. It identifies Resilience Objectives,
Acton Areas as well as short, medium and long term
initiatives to strengthen Melbourne’s resilience.
The Resilient Brimbank Framework provides a local
response to the implementation of the Resilient
Melbourne initiative. Brimbank City Council would like
to thank the Resilient Melbourne Delivery Office for
their support in developing the Resilient Brimbank
Framework.
As noted by Resilient Melbourne, 66% of
Melbournians believe it is important to be connected
to their local area, know their neighbours and attend
community events. For Brimbank to become more
resilient, action is needed which supports and
develops all community members’ networks and
connections to their neighbourhoods and supports a
sense of hope in their ability to survive and even thrive
in their lives.
What does a resilient Brimbank look like?
When asked what resilience looks like to them, people in Brimbank said:
Strong culture, cultural
practice and identity
Strong connection to country, language,
mob, networks and family
Culturally appropriate supports
and services
Economic independence
Recognising and celebrating differences
Opportunities to learn and share
A sustainable environment
People have the tools to make a positive
change
Social justice
Neighbourhood and
community pride
Hope
We have responsibility to
ourselves and each other
Introduction

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Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022 5
Brimbank City Council is a proud member of the Resilient Melbourne initiative. Resilient Melbourne is supported
by the 100 Resilient Cities initiative which defines urban resilience as:
Like Resilient Melbourne, Resilient Brimbank supports the
Brimbank communities’ efforts to adapt to the accelerating
changes we face, to survive no matter what shocks occur
and to confidently thrive, building a Brimbank that offers a
high quality of life to its residents, businesses and visitors
now and into the future. Brimbank City Council strives to
embed resilience strengthening activities and projects
into the way we work to enhance the resilience of the
Brimbank community, its partners and key stakeholders.
Council will work with our key stakeholders and partners
to build on community strengths. We will work to lift
the structural and long term health, education and
employment outcomes in the community which continue
to be below the Melbourne average, as demonstrated
in the maps included in the Appendix. Brimbank City
Council will continue to advocate to State and Federal
Governments for better outcomes through Catch
Up programs in the areas of health, education and
employment. Council supports the work of the West of
Melbourne Economic Development Alliance (WOMEDA)
and its Economic Development Strategy.
Council acknowledges that some population groups in the
community are vulnerable to poor health and wellbeing
outcomes due to social and economic disadvantage.
One of the key goals of this Framework is to lift the health
outcomes of vulnerable groups. Council will use a public
health approach to address both modifiable health risks
and social determinants that lead to poor health and
wellbeing outcomes for vulnerable populations in the
community.
Increasingly Local Government is supporting community
led responses to significant shocks and stresses. Often
this may not require doing ‘more’ but doing things
differently to what we have done in the past. Brimbank
City Council will continue to facilitate and support
community connections and networks to bring like
minded individuals and groups together to take advantage
of opportunities to codesign prevention, early intervention
and recovery efforts.
Brimbank City Council continues to work with the
Australian Health Policy Collaboration at Victoria University
on the Growing Brimbank initiative. The long term
Growing Brimbank program builds individual capability and
community capacity as the key elements of strengthening
community resilience. These community assets, with
social, environmental and physical infrastructure play a
critical role in reducing inequity. Growing Brimbank aims
to demonstrate 'what works' best in prevention and early
intervention to reduce risks influencing health, wellbeing
and education outcomes and community prosperity.
The capacity of individuals, institutions,
businesses and systems within a city
to adapt, survive and thrive no matter
what kind of chronic stresses and
acute shocks they experience.

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6 Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022
Brimbank is
one of the
most socially
and culturally
diverse
municipalities
in Australia
44.9% 19% 58%
205,741
69,275
58.9% 22.1%
160
Key Brimbank characteristics
Brimbank’s openness in welcoming people from all parts of the globe and giving everyone a ‘fair go’ has forged a
culturally rich and resilient community.
Brimbank’s Challenges
Brimbank has areas of entrenched social and economic disadvantage which increase our community's
vulnerability to shocks and stresses. The challenges identified below increase the level of vulnerability present in
the Brimbank community.
• Brimbank is the second most disadvantaged municipality in Melbourne. The highest disadvantage in Brimbank
occurring in St Albans East and the lowest disadvantage in Keilor
• 13.4% of residents do not speak English well or at all, compared to 5.6% across Greater Melbourne
• 1 in 4 people report poor to fair health status, 28.2% above the Australian rate
• Key health challenges include Type 2 diabetes, obesity and gambling
• 7.9% of Brimbank residents have Type 2 diabetes compared with 5.3% for Victoria
• 1 in 3 women over 18 years are obese which is 18% above the Australian rate
• $134 million was lost on poker machines in Brimbank last financial year
• In 2015, 17.5% of children were assessed as developmentally vulnerable on two or more Australian Early
Development Census domains, compared with 9.9% for the rest of Victoria
• Brimbank performs poorly across all education indicators with local residents being more likely than those of Greater
Melbourne to have only completed Year 8 or below, to have not attended school or to have no qualifications
• 2016 - 31.6% of low to middle income rental households and 17.5% of low to middle income mortgage households
experience housing stress in Brimbank
• 2017 - Unemployment in Brimbank 11.7%, higher than the Melbourne average of 5.9%
of Brimbank
residents were
born overseas
people of Brimbank
speak a language
other than English
at home
languages are spoken in
Brimbank. The top 10
languages other than English are:
Vietnamese, Punjabi, Filipino/
Tagalog, Greek, Maltese, Italian,
Macedonian, Arabic, Cantonese
and Croatian
Brimbank’s population is
of residents are
aged under 18
years
of residents are
aged between
18-59 years
of residents are
aged 60+ years
Average household size is 2.95 people in
and expected to
continue to
increase, especially
those aged under
19 years
people
dwellings

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Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022 7
Brimbank City Council takes a whole of Council approach to strengthening and building community resilience
through the broad range of work we do. This includes increasing shade and tree coverage to cool the municipality
during increasing heatwave events; supporting our more vulnerable members of the community in preparing
for and during extreme weather events; or strengthening social cohesion and trust to support the community in
challenges they may face such as long term unemployment, discrimination, health issues and violence. Council
has a role in increasing the resilience of the Brimbank community by ensuring service delivery and infrastructure
are not disrupted during shocks and stresses.
Vision
In Resilient Brimbank, our growing and diverse
community is inclusive, connected and is known for
its strength and willingness to share with each other.
Objectives
Action Areas
Adapt
– Reduce our exposure to future shocks and stresses
Survive
– Withstand disruptions and bounce back better than
before
Thrive
– Significantly improve people’s quality of life
Embed
– Build resilience thinking into our institutions and
ways of working
Stronger Together
Council will work with our culturally diverse
community, adjoining municipalities and partners
to address disadvantage and inequality while
building resilience and great social outcomes
over time.
Our Shared Places
All members of the community can enjoy living
in Brimbank through access to diverse and
accessible housing, quality infrastructure and
public spaces that support them to feel safe and
connected.
A Dynamic Economy
Build capacity and strengthen Brimbank's
economy and competitiveness to increase
social and economic participation as Brimbank
transitions to a low carbon and sustainable
future.
A Healthier Environment
Protecting our natural landscapes, enhancing
our biodiverse ecosystems and supporting a
network of green infrastructure that is adaptive
to climatic changes and supports an active and
healthy community.

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8 Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022
Brimbank was home to the Kurung-Jang-Balluk and Marin-Balluk clans of the Wurundjeri
which form part of the Kulin nation. Other groups in the area include the Yalukit-Willam and
Marpeang-Bulluk clans
1835-1839 - Aboriginal people in the now Brimbank region declined by 50% in the first four
years of European settlement
Late 1830s - 1840s - First migrants to the Brimbank area lived on pastoral leases in the
Sunshine and Keilor districts
1851 - Gold Rush in Victoria leads to large scale migration. Keilor used as a stopover on way to
goldfields. Significant population growth in Keilor
1890s - Economic Depression, widespread unemployment in Brimbank
1901 - 1902 - Drought made it very difficult for Brimbank's farmers and manufacturing
industry
1907 - The 'Harvester Judgement' led to the creation of a minimum living wage
for Australian workers
1908 - Australian women get the vote
1914 - 1918 - World War One
1915 - Women started attending Sunshine Technical School
1919 - New industry commences in Brimbank eg John Darling and Son Flour Mill
1923 - Fatal accident at Melbourne's first explosive factory in Deer Park led to the end of Black
Powder production
1929 - 1932 - The Great Depression - migration and development in Brimbank virtually ceased
1939 - 1945 - World War Two
1939 - 1945 - Maribyrnong, Deer Park, Sunshine and Braybrook had Australia's largest
concentration of munitions factories and laboratories. Many women began working in
factories for the first time
1939 - 1945 - Rapid industrial and population expansion led to significant impacts on the local
environment such as loss of open space and pollution from factories
1945 - 1960s - Increased immigration after World War Two. New factories emerged between
Albion, St Albans and North Sunshine.
Significant change in Keilor from Market Gardens to suburbanisation
1950s - Acute school shortage across Brimbank area due to population increasing ahead of
infrastructure
1950s - 1960s - Australia welcomed large numbers of refugees from Western and Eastern
Europe. Many settled in Brimbank
1961 - City of Sunshine was the second largest industrial area in Melbourne. More than one
third of the Sunshine population were born overseas. Migrants were mainly from Britain and
Mediterranean countries
1960s - Increased industry brought increases in pollution, noise and odours. Cars became more
popular and contributed to pollution and congestion
1962 - 1972 - Australia participated in the Vietnam War
1970 - Massey -Ferguson retrenches 900 workers (50% of employees). Sunshine could no
longer remain a 'factory city'
1970s - Refugees and other migrants come to Australia from an increased number of areas
such as Asia, Africa, Middle East, South and Central America and Afghanistan
1974 - Keilor floods cause significant damage
1975 - The Racial Discrimination Act is passed to ensure that Australians of all backgrounds are
treated equally
Brimbank's timeline
40,000
years
ago
1800s
1900 to 1980

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Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022 9
Brimbank was home to the Kurung-Jang-Balluk and Marin-Balluk clans of the Wurundjeri
which form part of the Kulin nation. Other groups in the area include the Yalukit-Willam and
Marpeang-Bulluk clans
1835-1839 - Aboriginal people in the now Brimbank region declined by 50% in the first four
years of European settlement
Late 1830s - 1840s - First migrants to the Brimbank area lived on pastoral leases in the
Sunshine and Keilor districts
1851 - Gold Rush in Victoria leads to large scale migration. Keilor used as a stopover on way to
goldfields. Significant population growth in Keilor
1890s - Economic Depression, widespread unemployment in Brimbank
1901 - 1902 - Drought made it very difficult for Brimbank's farmers and manufacturing
industry
1907 - The 'Harvester Judgement' led to the creation of a minimum living wage
for Australian workers
1908 - Australian women get the vote
1914 - 1918 - World War One
1915 - Women started attending Sunshine Technical School
1919 - New industry commences in Brimbank eg John Darling and Son Flour Mill
1923 - Fatal accident at Melbourne's first explosive factory in Deer Park led to the end of Black
Powder production
1929 - 1932 - The Great Depression - migration and development in Brimbank virtually ceased
1939 - 1945 - World War Two
1939 - 1945 - Maribyrnong, Deer Park, Sunshine and Braybrook had Australia's largest
concentration of munitions factories and laboratories. Many women began working in
factories for the first time
1939 - 1945 - Rapid industrial and population expansion led to significant impacts on the local
environment such as loss of open space and pollution from factories
1945 - 1960s - Increased immigration after World War Two. New factories emerged between
Albion, St Albans and North Sunshine.
Significant change in Keilor from Market Gardens to suburbanisation
1950s - Acute school shortage across Brimbank area due to population increasing ahead of
infrastructure
1950s - 1960s - Australia welcomed large numbers of refugees from Western and Eastern
Europe. Many settled in Brimbank
1961 - City of Sunshine was the second largest industrial area in Melbourne. More than one
third of the Sunshine population were born overseas. Migrants were mainly from Britain and
Mediterranean countries
1960s - Increased industry brought increases in pollution, noise and odours. Cars became more
popular and contributed to pollution and congestion
1962 - 1972 - Australia participated in the Vietnam War
1970 - Massey -Ferguson retrenches 900 workers (50% of employees). Sunshine could no
longer remain a 'factory city'
1970s - Refugees and other migrants come to Australia from an increased number of areas
such as Asia, Africa, Middle East, South and Central America and Afghanistan
1974 - Keilor floods cause significant damage
1975 - The Racial Discrimination Act is passed to ensure that Australians of all backgrounds are
treated equally

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1980s - 1990s- Old established industries from the Sunshine area close down
eg Darling Flour Mill
1980s - 1994 - Leigh Bowery from Sunshine influenced the international arts worlds. His vision to
'Be Bold' continues to influence many people to be whoever they want to be
1991 - Poker Machines introduced in Brimbank
1994 - City of Brimbank declared following amalgamation of the former Cities of
Sunshine and Keilor
1996 - 1999 - First Islamic buildings arrive in Brimbank - Bosnian Islamic Centre in Albanvale and the
Islamic Mosque in Sunshine
2000s to present - poor air quality events across southern parts of Brimbank on some days
2009 - Black Saturday bushfires - 173 deaths, 2,133 homes destroyed, 370 deaths from heat across Victoria
2011 - Widespread and destructive hail storms
2014 - Major heatwave - 97% increase in cardiac emergencies in Melbourne compared to 2013
2016 - Corkman Pub in Carlton demolished. Asbestos from site dumped in Cairnlea
2016 - John Kelly's 'Man Lifting Cow' sculpture installed in his home town Sunshine celebrates Brimbank's
transition from its industrial past and the resilience of its people
2016 - 2018 - Introduction of National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)
2017 - Thunderstorm asthma event
2017 - Incident in Bourke St, Melbourne, pedestrians killed by car
2017 - Closures of Holden and Toyota Factories in Brimbank
Increasing pressure on services like transport, healthcare, homelessness, family services, English
language services, employment and training
A changing climate expected with more severe weather events
Ageing population
Changing future skills required by our children in digital literacy, bi-bilingualism, problem solving and creativity
Increasing pressure on Brimbank's natural assets
Increasing population leading to requirement for additional housing
1980 to 2017
2018-2040
10 Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022

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Brimbank’s Current
Resilient Strengthening
Commitments
Action Areas
Adapt
Resilience Objectives
Current Council commitments
Stronger
Together
Our
Shared
Places
A Dynamic
Economy
A Healthier
Environment Council role
Sustainable Water Strategy 2013 – 2023
Lead
Climate Change Adaptation Framework
2017 – 2022
 
Lead
Brimbank Greenhouse Reduction Strategy
2013 – 2023
Lead
Brimbank Heat and Social Vulnerability Mapping
2017
Lead
Urban Forest Strategy 2016 – 2046
   
Lead
Brimbank Housing Strategy 2014
Lead
Brimbank Industrial Land Strategy 2012
Lead
Brimbank Activity Centre Strategy 2008
Lead
Building a Safe Community Together. Brimbank
Community Safety Strategy 2015 – 2019
   
Lead
Change management in Council’s Community
Wellbeing division
Lead
Brimbank Children's Plan 2015 – 2019
  
Lead
Creating Better Parks 2016
 
Lead
Brimbank Youth Strategy 2015 – 2019
 
Lead
Brimbank Reconciliation Action Plan 2013 – 2017
   
Lead
Brimbank Settlement Action Plan 2013 – 2017
 
Lead
Sports Facility Development Plan 2016
   
Lead
Community Plan 2009 – 2030
   
Partnership
1980s - 1990s- Old established industries from the Sunshine area close down
eg Darling Flour Mill
1980s - 1994 - Leigh Bowery from Sunshine influenced the international arts worlds. His vision to
'Be Bold' continues to influence many people to be whoever they want to be
1991 - Poker Machines introduced in Brimbank
1994 - City of Brimbank declared following amalgamation of the former Cities of
Sunshine and Keilor
1996 - 1999 - First Islamic buildings arrive in Brimbank - Bosnian Islamic Centre in Albanvale and the
Islamic Mosque in Sunshine
2000s to present - poor air quality events across southern parts of Brimbank on some days
2009 - Black Saturday bushfires - 173 deaths, 2,133 homes destroyed, 370 deaths from heat across Victoria
2011 - Widespread and destructive hail storms
2014 - Major heatwave - 97% increase in cardiac emergencies in Melbourne compared to 2013
2016 - Corkman Pub in Carlton demolished. Asbestos from site dumped in Cairnlea
2016 - John Kelly's 'Man Lifting Cow' sculpture installed in his home town Sunshine celebrates Brimbank's
transition from its industrial past and the resilience of its people
2016 - 2018 - Introduction of National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)
2017 - Thunderstorm asthma event
2017 - Incident in Bourke St, Melbourne, pedestrians killed by car
2017 - Closures of Holden and Toyota Factories in Brimbank
Increasing pressure on services like transport, healthcare, homelessness, family services, English
language services, employment and training
A changing climate expected with more severe weather events
Ageing population
Changing future skills required by our children in digital literacy, bi-bilingualism, problem solving and creativity
Increasing pressure on Brimbank's natural assets
Increasing population leading to requirement for additional housing
Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022 11

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Action Areas
Survive
Resilience Objectives
Current Council commitments
Stronger
Together
Our
Shared
Places
A Dynamic
Economy
A Healthier
Environment Council role
Climate Change Adaptation Framework
2017 – 2022
 
Lead
Age Friendly City Plan 2018 - 2022
 
Lead
Building a Safe Community Together. Brimbank
Community Safety Strategy 2015 – 2019
Lead
Brimbank Children's Plan 2015 - 2019
   
Lead
Brimbank Youth Strategy 2015 - 2019
 
Lead
Brimbank Settlement Action Plan 2013 – 2017
 
Lead
Brimbank Reconciliation Action Plan 2013 – 2017
   
Lead
Brimbank Community Services and Infrastructure
Planning
 
Lead
Sports Facility Development Plan 2016
   
Lead
Community Plan 2009 - 2030
Partnership
Council Plan 2017 - 2021
  
Lead
12 Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022

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Action Areas
Thrive
Resilience Objectives
Current Council commitments
Stronger
Together
Our Shared
Places
A Dynamic
Economy
A Healthier
Environment Council role
Climate Change Adaptation Framework 2017-2022
Lead
Sustainability Victoria's Healthy Homes Program
2018
Partnership
Solar Savers Program 2018
Partnership
Age Friendly City Plan 2018-2022
 
Lead
Brimbank Walking and Cycling Strategy - 2016
  
Lead
Building a Safe Community Together. Brimbank
Community Safety Strategy 2015 – 2019
Lead
Growing Brimbank
   
Partnership
Brimbank City Council's Plan to Prevent Men's
Violence Against Women, Towards Gender Equity:
2015 – 2019
Lead
Brimbank Children's Plan 2015 – 2019
   
Lead
Brimbank Social Justice Charter 2012
Lead
Brimbank Community Services and Infrastructure
Planning
Lead
Brimbank Electronic Gambling Policy 2015
Lead
Creating Better Parks 2016
 
Lead
Brimbank Youth Strategy 2015 – 2019
 
Lead
Sports Facility Development Plan 2016
   
Lead
Community Strengthening Policy 2014
Lead
Neighbour Day Program
 
Lead
Brimbank Volunteering Program
   
Lead
Brimbank Service Providers Network meetings
   
Lead
Brimbank Economic Development Strategy
2016 - 2020
Lead
Municipal Development Contributions Plan 2017;
Sunshine Town Centre Development Contributions
Plan 2014
 
Lead
Library Strategy 2020
 
Lead
Brimbank Community Learning Strategy 2014 - 2017
Lead
Western Youth Employment Project
Partnership
Brimbank Neighbourhood House Strategic
Partnership Agreement and Action Plan 2018 - 2021
 
Partnership
Local Historical Societies Support Policy 2017
Lead
Community Plan 2009 – 2030
   
Partnership
Brimbank Council Plan 2017 – 2021
   
Lead
Dynamic Young Citizens of Brimbank
   
Lead
Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022 13

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Action Areas
Embed
Resilience Objectives
Current Council commitments
Stronger
Together
Our
Shared
Places
A Dynamic
Economy
A Healthier
Environment Council role
Climate Change Adaptation Framework
2017-2022
Lead
Brimbank City Council's Plan to Prevent Men's
Violence Against Women, Towards Gender
Equity: 2015-2019
Lead
Change management in Council’s Community
Wellbeing division
 
Lead
Brimbank Children's Plan 2015 -2019
   
Lead
Social Justice Charter 2012
Lead
Brimbank Community Services and Infrastructure
Planning
 
Lead
Brimbank Urban Forest Strategy 2016 - 2046
   
Lead
Values Realignment Plan
Lead
Leadership Development Program/Leadership
Competency Framework
Lead
Community Engagement Policy 2018
 
Lead
Brimbank Reconciliation Action Plan 2013 – 2017
   
Lead
Brimbank Settlement Action Plan 2013 -2017
 
Lead
Brimbank Disability Action Plan 2017 – 2021
 
Lead
Brimbank Community Plan 2009 – 2030
   
Partnership
Brimbank Community Services and Infrastructure
Planning
Lead
Brimbank Council Plan 2017 - 2021
Lead
Growing Brimbank
   
Lead
14 Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022

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Monitoring
and evaluation
Council will monitor implementation of the above policies and initiatives.
This will ensure Brimbank continues to strengthen its community resilience
and prepare for the impact of shocks and stresses which may threaten
the cohesion and liveability of our community. Monitoring will commence
during the first year of the Framework’s implementation however a
three year implementation report will be presented to Council following
implementation of the current Council Plan.
Implementation
As well as implementing the above commitments, Council will communicate
with community organisations advising them of the Resilient Brimbank
Framework and the support and partnership opportunities available to work
together with Council to strengthen the Brimbank community’s resilience.
Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022 15

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Appendices
2016 SEIFA index of relative socio-economic disadvantage
16 Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022

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Residents not in employment, education or training
Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022 17

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Residents not fluent in English
18 Resilient Brimbank Framework 2018-2022

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Brimbank City Council
Telephone
9249 4000
Email
info@brimbank.vic.gov.au
Post
PO Box 70, Sunshine, VIC 3020
Hearing or speech impaired?
• TTY dial
133 677
• Speak & Listen
1300 555 727
www.relayservice.gov.au
, then enter
03 9249 4000
Find us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube
www.facebook.com/brimbankcouncil
www.twitter.com/brimbankcouncil
www.youtube.com/brimbankcitycouncil
Brimbank Language Link
www.brimbank.vic.gov.au
9209 0140
Local call costs apply
072 - 0318