image
Brimbank
Annual Report
2020-2021
image
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
3
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
2
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Contents
Executive Summary
5
01 Introduction
6
Snapshot of Council
7
Highlights of the year
10
Opportunities and challenges
14
Brimbank COVID-19 relief and recovery snapshot
15
The year in review
16
Message from the Mayor
16
Chief Executive Officer’s message
17
Financial summary
18
Description of operations
20
Major changes
21
Our Council
22
About the Councillors
23
02 Our People
27
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2021
28
Organisation structure at 30 June 2021
29
Workforce profile
30
Other staff matters
32
03 Our Performance
33
Planning and Accountability Framework
34
Council Plan Goals and Strategic Objectives
35
Our Goal: An Inclusive Community
36
Our Goal: A Liveable Community
43
Our Goal: A Prosperous Community
50
Our Goal: An Innovative and Responsive
‘Community First’ Council
53
04 Governance and Management
and other information
59
Governance and Management
60
Governance and Management Checklist
68
Statutory information
70
Infrastructure and development contributions
74
2020 Community Satisfaction Survey
75
Advocacy, consultation and community engagement
77
Volunteering in Brimbank
79
Awards
80
05 Performance Statement
83
Description of municipality
84
Sustainable Capacity Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2021 84
Service Performance Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2021 85
Financial Performance Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2021 88
Retired Indicators for the year ended 30 June 2021
90
Certification of the Performance Statement
91
Independent Auditor’s Report
92
06 Financial Report
94
Contents
95
A Plain English Guide to the Annual Financial Report
96
Certification of the Financial Statements
99
Independent Auditor’s Report
100
Financial Statements
102
Acronyms
153
Index
154
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
5
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
Executive Summary
01
Introduction
Here you’ll find our major highlights and achievements of the year, messages from our Mayor and CEO,
future initiatives we plan to roll out in 2021-2022, our recovery from COVID-19, and opportunities and
challenges now and into the future.
02
Our people
General information about Brimbank, our workforce, Executive Management Team, Councillors,
organisational structure, learning and development, and occupational health and safety.
03
Our performance
Details on how we are delivering our vision for Brimbank through meeting our Council Plan 2017-
2021 goals and key strategic objectives: an inclusive community, a liveable community, a prosperous
community, and an innovative and prosperous ‘community-first’ council.
04
Governance and management and other information
Information about governance, including council meetings, local laws, committees and audits as part
of our commitment to providing good governance and ensuring that all of our operations are open,
transparent and accountable.
05
Performance Statement
Includes our Performance Statements and the Victorian Auditor General’s (VAGO) Report on our
performance.
06
Financial Report
Detailed account of our Financial Statement for the 2020-2021 financial year.
4
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
WELCOME
#WeAreBrimbank
Brimbank City Council is proud to present this
2020-2021 annual report to our community,
ratepayers, residents and stakeholders.
This annual report provides a comprehensive
summary of our operations and performance for
the 2020-2021 financial year.
It is set out in six different sections to help you
navigate information on how we are tracking in
meeting the goals and objectives laid out in our
key strategic document, the Council Plan 2017-
2021, as well as important details on finances,
governance and our organisation.
All Victorian councils are required to prepare
an annual report in accordance with the
Local
Government Act 2020
, and submit it to the
Minister for Local Government.
The Brimbank City Council Annual Report
2020-2021 aims to fulfil Council’s statutory
responsibilities under the
Local Government Act
2020
and the
Information Privacy Act 2000
.
This report has also been prepared in
accordance with the L
ocal Government
(Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014
, and
the Council Plan 2017-2021.
Our annual report is not just about meeting
our legislative obligations. It can also serve as
an important accountability measure for the
Brimbank community on our achievements
and highlights over the past 12 months, as well
as a space to celebrate our organisation and
community.
You will also find key information on how we
plan to continue serving our community in
2021-2022.
To obtain a copy of this document, please
contact Council’s Customer Service Centre
on
9249 4000
or view a copy online at
brimbank.vic.gov.au
If you have any feedback on this report, or
suggestions on what you would like to see
included in future annual reports, please
contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on
9249 4000
or email
info@brimbank.vic.gov.au
image
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
7
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
01
Introduction
Welcome to the
Report of Operations
2020-2021
Council is transparent and
accountable in reporting
to the community. The
Report of Operations
2020-2021 explains in
detail Council’s operations
and performance during
the financial year.
Snapshot of Council
About Brimbank
Who we are
Brimbank is a vibrant, growing community in the
heart of Melbourne’s west. Diversity is central
to our identity – we are proudly multicultural,
embracing people from around the world and
weaving their stories into our own. Brimbank’s
estimated resident population of 208,247
in 2020 makes it the fifth most populous
municipality in Greater Melbourne.
Where we come from
The City of Brimbank was established in 1994,
uniting the former Keilor and Sunshine Councils.
It was named after Brimbank Park in Keilor, which
gained its name from the practice of farmers
driving livestock ‘around the brim of the bank’ of
the Maribyrnong River.
Brimbank City Council respectfully acknowledges
the Traditional Custodians of this land, the
Wurundjeri People, and pays our respect to Elders
past, present and emerging.
Council also recognises the diversity of
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
who contribute to our Brimbank Community. We
pay our respect to the wisdom of Elders, past,
present and emerging.
Brimbank lies within the area occupied by the
Kurung-Jang-Balluk and Marin-Balluk clans of
the Wurundjeri People (also known as the Woi
wurrung language group), who form part of the
larger Kulin Nation. Other groups who occupied
the land in the area include Yalukit-Willam and
Marpeang-Bulluk.
We also recognise the Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander community’s continuing
spiritual connection to the land and renew our
commitment to respect their beliefs, values and
customs, as we learn to share our lives and build a
future together.
The first European settlements were
established at Keilor in the late 1840s, Sunshine
(then known as Braybrook Junction) in the
mid-1880s and St Albans in the late 1880s.
After the Second World War, many suburbs were
developed around the original settlements to
house the influx of migrants. More recently,
areas that were once industrial hubs have been
transformed into new residential suburbs that
are continuing to grow rapidly.
Our place
Brimbank spans an area between 11 and
23 kilometres west and north-west of
Melbourne’s CBD.
It is bound by the City of Hume in the north, the
Cities of Maribyrnong and Moonee Valley in the
east, the Cities of Hobsons Bay and Wyndham in
the south and the City of Melton in the west.
Fifteen per cent of Brimbank’s total area is
classified as open space, including natural
treasures such as Organ Pipes National Park
and Mount Derrimut Grasslands, as well as
Green Gully Reserve, Brimbank Park and Iramoo
Wildflower Grassland Reserve.
A total of 440 registered Aboriginal
archaeological sites exist within the area with
the oldest artefacts found to be over 30,000
years old.
Our strategic position at the heart of
Melbourne’s west has been cemented with
major infrastructure commitments from the
Victorian and Commonwealth Governments that
continue to transform the region.
Our suburbs are as diverse as our people –
from the hustle and bustle of Sunshine and
St Albans, to historic Keilor; each has its own
flavour and personality.
Sunshine: A designated metropolitan activity
centre, Sunshine’s profile is rising due to its
proximity to the city and its mouth-watering
food scene. It includes a Victoria University
campus, the Brimbank Community and Civic
Centre and significant retail and commercial
activities. It is also close to the growing
Sunshine Hospital. Sunshine services suburbs
which include Albion, Sunshine North, Sunshine
West and part of Brooklyn.
St Albans: St Albans is a designated major
activity centre that includes a Victoria University
campus, the St Albans Community Centre and
Bowery Theatre, and a thriving restaurant and
retail precinct. St Albans services neighbouring
suburbs Albanvale, Kings Park and Kealba.
Deer Park: Servicing the nearby suburbs of
Ardeer, Derrimut and Cairnlea, Deer Park has
a rich array of restaurants and shops. Major
features of the area include the Hunt Club
Community and Arts Centre, Black Powder Mill
and Brimbank Central Shopping Centre.
Sydenham: A significant major activity centre
that will continue to grow and develop.
Sydenham services suburbs including
Sydenham, Calder Park, Taylors Lakes, Delahey
and parts of Hillside. Watergardens Town Centre
is the jewel in its crown, while Calder Park
Motorsport Complex is another landmark.
Keilor: Keilor is set among rolling hills and
national and state parks, including Organ Pipes
National Park, Brimbank Park and Green Gully
Reserve. It services suburbs including Keilor,
Keilor North, Keilor Park and Keilor Downs, as
well as parts of Keilor East and Tullamarine.
Our people
Brimbank has a rich Aboriginal history. The
Wurundjeri People have been the custodians of
the land in the Port Phillip Bay region, including
parts of our current City of Brimbank, for more
than 40,000 years before European settlement.
Brimbank is one of the most culturally diverse
municipalities in Australia, with almost half of
our residents born outside Australia.
Brimbank’s suburbs boomed after World War II,
when migrants from southern Europe flowed to
the area. More recently, newly arrived Asian and
African communities have developed alongside
the more established European communities.
More than half of our residents speak a
language other than English at home, with more
than 160 languages represented. The top 10
languages, other than English, are Vietnamese,
Maltese, Italian, Greek, Macedonian, Filipino,
Cantonese, Arabic, Punjabi and Croatian.
Employment and industry
Brimbank is increasingly becoming a major
employment hub for Melbourne’s west.
Manufacturing is the key employer in
Brimbank, followed by retail, health care and
social assistance.
Brimbank is home to a range of established
organisations, including Aldi, ARC, Australia Post,
Boral, Bunnings, Caterpillar, FedEx, Ferguson
Plarre, Fisher and Paykel, Hunter Leisure, John
Deere, Lombards, Schweppes, Schiavello and
Sims Metal.
In more recent times, companies such
as IBM, Metronode, Digital Realty, Rand
Group, Preshafruit, Sleepyhead, VicRoads
and Vistaprint have also chosen to settle
in Brimbank.
Reconciliation in Brimbank
Council acknowledges the Wurundjeri People
as the Traditional Custodians of the land and
recognises their continuing spiritual connection to
the land, and renews its commitment to respect
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander beliefs, values
and customs.
6
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
12km
BALLARAT
GEELONG
BENDIGO
BRIMBANK
MELTON
GROWTH AREA
WYNDHAM
GROWTH AREA
Melbourne Airport
Port of Melbourne
INNER
MELBOURNE
SUNSHINE
8
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
9
01 Introduction
I
Snapshot of Council
About 440 Registered Aboriginal Places exist in
the Brimbank Local Government Area. The oldest
artefacts found in the city are more than 30,000
years old.
On 26 February 2008, Council adopted the
full motion passed by the Federal Government
on 13 February 2008 in saying sorry to the
Stolen Generations on behalf of the Australian
Parliament and people, and extended an apology
to those Stolen Generations on behalf of the
people of Brimbank.
On 17 April 2012, Council endorsed a Reconciliation
Statement of Commitment which was officially
signed on 29 May 2012. The Statement committed
Council to learning from the past and seeking new
ways to build relationships with the Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander community, and to
developing a Reconciliation Action Plan. It was
committed that the Reconciliation Action Plan
would be developed in consultation with internal
and external stakeholders including Council staff,
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents and
local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander service
providers and community groups.
In May 2013, Council adopted its first
Reconciliation Action Plan 2013-2017, as a
framework to support the national reconciliation
Snapshot of Council (continued)
movement, embrace unity and show respect
between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
people and other Australians. The second
Reconciliation Action Plan 2019-2021 was
adopted in July 2019. It builds on the strengths
and achievements of the first Reconciliation
Action Plan.
In September 2016, a Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) between Brimbank City
Council and the Wurundjeri Tribe Land and
Compensation Cultural Heritage Council was
signed, marking an important step toward
reconciliation and reaffirming the genuine
connection, pride and belonging of our Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander community.
Council has established a Brimbank Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Consultative Committee to
provide Council with input relating to Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander issues and advice on
development and ongoing implementation of
Council’s Reconciliation Action Plan.
Since July 2011, Council has flown both the
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags
alongside the Australian national flag every day
outside its municipal office.
Each year Council hosts a broad range of
activities during National Reconciliation and
NAIDOC Weeks, such as Aboriginal cultural
heritage tours, Sorry Day events, Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander art exhibitions, library
story-telling sessions and NAIDOC flag raisings.
Due to COVID-19 restrictions, Council has had to
change the way such events were delivered over
the past year.
Council continues to enhance its public spaces
with a diversity of contemporary art forms
which encourages reflection on unique heritage
such as Aboriginal history, culture and the
peoples, our neigbourhoods and aspirations for
our communities.
Brimbank at a glance
u
Area
123 square kilometres
u
Population count
208,247
(estimated resident population, June 2020)
u
Males
50.0%
u
Females
50.0%
u
Residents aged under 18 years 22.1%
u
Residents aged between
18 to 59 years
58.9%
u
Residents aged 60 years and over 19.0%
u
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander population 816 (0.4%)
u
Residents who speak a
non-English language at home 58.3%
u
Median house price for 2020 $630,000
Source of Data:
Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population
and Housing 2016 (usual residence). Compiled and
presented in profile.id by .id, the population experts -
http://www.id.com.au/brimbank
The median house price for 2020 was sourced
from the Valuer-General Victoria. https://www.
propertyandlandtitles.vic.gov.au/property-information/
property-prices
Vision, principles, goals, strategic
objectives and values
Brimbank’s Council Plan 2017-2021 sets out
Council’s vision, principles, goals and strategic
objectives as follows:
Vision
Brimbank – vibrant, harmonious and welcoming,
a great place to live, work and grow.
Principles
The following principles underpin the core of
Council’s work and frame the decisions made
now and into the future.
Building community resilience
Building community resilience to survive,
adapt and grow during the fast-paced
challenges of the 21st century will be
essential to help communities prepare for
change and whatever the future holds.
Council will draw on the strengths of our
diverse communities and geographies, to
pursue our shared interests, embrace our
differences and be stronger together.
Community first
Serving the Brimbank community is why we
exist. Every decision we make and every dollar
we spend is with the aim of continually improving
the lives of the people who live in our city. In
our decision-making and the delivery of Council
business we will place our community first.
Social justice
Council is committed to access, equity,
community participation and human rights for
all citizens. By working in partnerships with local
groups, community agencies and government
departments, Council aims to build upon our
existing community assets, strengths and
capabilities to achieve social change, fairness
and better outcomes for disadvantaged groups.
Sustainability
Council seeks to build a legacy of enabling
an engaged and resilient community that
supports a sustainable environment, containing
rich social, economic and environmental
characteristics. ‘Sustainability’ means
our actions meet current needs without
compromising the prospects of future
generations. In achieving this, Council will
incorporate environmental considerations
alongside social and economic values in our
decision-making processes and support our
community to become sustainability stewards.
Goals and strategic objectives
• Goal: An inclusive community
- Our community members are safe,
healthy and well
- People have opportunities to
participate in community life
- Services and facilities are fit-for
purpose and well-run
- Our community belongs and is proud of
where they live
• Goal: A liveable community
- Public and open spaces are safe, clean
and well-maintained
- People can get around easily on foot, by
bike, car or public transport
- Our community lives sustainably
- The natural environment supports
thriving biodiversity that is protected
and well-connected
- The urban environment
supports a growing population in
designated areas while respecting
neighbourhood character and
heritage where appropriate
• Goal: A prosperous community
- People are able to access quality
education and lifelong learning
opportunities
- People are able to find and maintain
jobs that provide income security
- The local economy is strong and
provides opportunities for the
community to thrive
- Housing is of good quality, well-located
and affordable
- Brimbank is a leading destination
for business, working, learning,
recreation and living
• Goal: An innovative and responsive
‘community first’ Council
- Council is fair, honest and transparent
- Council advocates and works in the
interests of our community
- Council manages our assets and
finances sustainably and responsibly
- Council staff are high performing and
community-focused
Values
At Brimbank all our roles impact and support the
diverse needs of our community. Our values and
behaviours demonstrate what is important to us:
We act with
INTEGRITY
I take pride in my work and commit to serving
our community.
I am honest, transparent and accountable in
all that I do.
We find
BETTER WAYS
I strive to achieve the best outcomes for our
Community.
I am open and curious about new ideas and
ways of working.
We are
RESPECTFUL
I value diversity, fairness and equity.
I demonstrate empathy and compassion.
We work
TOGETHER
I support and encourage others.
I find opportunities to connect with others
and celebrate wins.
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
image
10
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
11
Our Goal:
An Inclusive Community
Strategic objectives:
• Our community members are safe,
healthy and well
• People have opportunities to
participate in community life
• Services and facilities are fit-for
purpose and well-run
• Our community belongs and are
proud of where they live
01 Introduction
I
Highlights of the year
Highlights of the year
Our Goal:
A Liveable Community
Strategic objectives:
• Public and open spaces are safe,
clean and well-maintained
• People can get around easily
on foot, by bike, car or by
public transport
• Our community lives sustainably
• The natural environment supports
thriving biodiversity that is
protected and well-connected
• The urban environment
supports a growing population in
designated areas while respecting
neighbourhood character and
heritage where appropriate
• Implementing the performance requirements
of the Brimbank Environmentally Sustainable
Design Framework on new Council facilities
and refurbishments.
• Continuing works to improve pedestrian and
vehicular access through the various road
and footpath programs in Council’s Capital
Works Program.
• Continuing to advocate to the State
Government for improved active and public
transport in line with the Brimbank Transport
Priorities Paper.
• Completing Council’s Road Rehabilitation and
Surfacing Programs as part of Council’s 2020-
2021 Capital Works Budget.
• Updating Council’s Road Management Plan.
• Adopting the Sunshine Priority Precinct 2050
Vision document which sets the strategic
direction for the Transforming Brimbank agenda
and will guide all future strategic work within
the precinct.
Future Initiatives
• Review and refresh the Brimbank Transport
Priorities Paper to reflect current Council,
State and Federal commitments, and outline
Council’s key transport priorities.
• Work in partnership to research and design
options that use plastic and glass waste for
construction of roads.
• Develop a master plan for Alfrieda Street,
St Albans as a key destination for gathering,
shopping and socialising in a vibrant space.
• Continue implementation of the Sydenham
Park Master Plan 2020, including presenting
to Council the outcomes of feasibility studies
and preliminary investigations undertaken in
2020-2021 and an updated Sydenham Park
Master Plan for Council’s consideration.
• Continue to conduct street tree planting
programs to increase Brimbank’s tree canopy
coverage as per the Urban Forest Strategy
(2016-2046).
• Finalise building works and commission the
new Brimbank Aquatic and Wellness Centre.
• Continue to review and update Council
on State Government advice on the
implementation of Recycling Victoria - A
New Economy Policy and in particular the
Household Recycling Program (4-Bin System).
• Investigate opportunities for community
renewable energy projects such as ‘solar
gardens’ on Council owned sites such
as former landfills, and collaborate with
the Victorian Government to promote
community energy.
• Through the Creating Better Streets Program,
investigate opportunities to redesign key
streets to be walking and cycling friendly
corridors that include high levels of shade
trees, vegetation and water sensitive design
infrastructure such as raingardens.
• Develop and implement compliance initiatives
to respond to reported illegal waste dumping.
Key achievements
• Implementing the Graffiti Prevention and
Management Program to enhance the
appearance, character and experience of
Brimbank public spaces through preventing and
managing the presence of unauthorised graffiti.
• Completing lighting upgrades in the Sunshine
Town Centre (including installation of a
projection on the Brimbank Community and
Civic Centre rear wall and feature lighting in
Hampshire Road).
• Implementing the Creating Better Parks – Open
Space and Playground Policy and Plan, resulting
in all new and upgraded parks funded through
the 2020-2021 Capital Works Program being
complete.
• Completing Stage Three of the Hampshire Road
Masterplan to create a green active hub.
• Continuing to implement the Brimbank Public
Toilet Strategy (2018-2030) with upgrades at
Delahey Recreation Reserve.
• Continuing implementation of the Sydenham
Park Master Plan 2020.
• Progressing strategic network improvements
via the implementation of Year Four Actions
in the Brimbank Cycling and Walking Strategy
including the new shared user path from Davitt
Drive to Robinson Road, Deer Park.
• Continuing works on the Upper Stony Creek
Project, managed by Melbourne Water, which
are 90 per cent complete and the walking paths
are now open to the public.
• Delivering street tree planting programs to
increase Brimbank’s tree canopy coverage as
per the Urban Forest Strategy (2016-2046).
• Continuing to deliver the ‘Light Up’ program in
the Sunshine and St Albans Activity Centres
through a range of initiatives including lighting
projections, decorative and artistic lighting and
evening activation.
• Implementing the Year Two Actions of the
Brimbank Car Parking Strategy.
• Finalising the draft Aboriginal Cultural
Heritage guidelines for internal and
external stakeholders.
• Finalising the draft Planning Policy Framework,
incorporating the new Municipal Planning
Strategy and revised Clauses.
• Implementing Year Two Actions of the
Brimbank Activity Centre Strategy including
delivery of the Local Centre Activation Program.
• Supporting households to manage their food
and garden waste through the Brimbank Home
Composting Program.
• Deploying cameras in hot spot areas to respond
to reported illegal waste dumping.
• Executing actions in the Revised Sustainable
Water Management Strategy including the
Balmoral Stormwater Harvesting Scheme which
has reached practical completion.
• Continuing to administer the Sustainable Land
Management Grant Scheme.
• Facilitating the Brimbank Youth Council to
provide opportunities for young people to
represent their peers on topics of importance,
allowing Council to better understand the
lived experience of young people.
• Applying the Brimbank Coronavirus COVID-19
Safe Plan and Service Rollback Plans to
ensure the health, safety and wellbeing of
residents and staff.
• Supporting belonging and learning through
a wide range of virtual and face to face
programs at neighbourhood houses and
community centres.
• Delivering a diverse range of activities and
performances at Bowery Theatre.
• Installing murals across Brimbank including at
Glengala Hall and the Multi-Deck Car Park in
Sunshine, at the Hunt Club in Deer Park and
a mural of two local Indigenous Elders at the
Tin Shed in St Albans.
Future Initiatives
• Create opportunities to support newly
engaged communities to engage in physical
activity via the In2Sport program.
• Complete Female Sports Facilities Upgrades
that aim to increase equity, access and
opportunities for existing and emerging
female participants and officials in sport and
active recreation.
• Facilitate the Brimbank Youth Council to
provide opportunities for young people to
represent their peers on topics of importance,
allowing Council to better understand the
lived experience of young people.
• Facilitate the delivery of Mental Health First
Aid programs to increase the capacity of
people to recognise and support peers who
may be developing a mental health problem.
• Support the development of youth friendly
spaces that support an increase in the
delivery of services for young people.
• Continue to facilitate the Brimbank Collective
Action Committee to lead and initiate Impact
Brimbank aiming to close health and social
outcomes gaps for the Brimbank community
over a ten year period.
• Partner with the health and community
sector to champion actions to address the
health impacts of climate change such as
heatwaves, and promote co-benefits such as
reduced energy bills
• Map and analyse gaps in Council’s responses
to loneliness and isolation as an escalating
mental health challenge.
• Prepare a report detailing analysis of the
mental health service provision and needs
for Brimbank residents and local strategies
to improve community mental health and
wellbeing.
Key Achievements
• Implementing a range of actions from
multiple plans and strategies that aim
to continue to enhance health and
wellbeing outcomes of the Brimbank
community, including:
- Brimbank Physical Activity Strategy –
Year Three actions
- Brimbank Children’s Strategy – Year One
actions
- Brimbank Age Friendly City Plan –
Year Three actions
- Brimbank Youth Strategy – Year One
actions
- Brimbank Disability Action Plan –
Year Four actions
- Brimbank Volunteer Strategy – Year Three
actions
- Brimbank Fairness, Equality and Respect
Strategy – Year Two actions
- Brimbank Electronic Gambling Policy –
Year Two actions
- Brimbank Settlement Action Plan – Year
Three actions
- Reconciliation Action Plan – Year Two
actions
- Brimbank Cultural Strategy 2018-2022 –
Year Three actions
- Brimbank Response and Recovery
Strategy – Stages 1 and 2
- Brimbank Social Justice Charter
• Completing upgrades to sports facilities
(including pavilions, lighting, change rooms
and sports surfaces) as determined by the
Sports Facility Development Plan 2018.
• Planning and delivery of needs-based
activities and programs that aim to support
female participation as per the Women’s
Participation in Sport and Recreation in
Melbourne’s West Project Action Plan.
• Implementing a range of facility upgrades
identified in the Community Services and
Infrastructure Plan.
• Continuing to support the community during
COVID-19 via the Community Register, staffed
by volunteers.
• Facilitating the delivery of Youth Mental
Health First Aid programs to increase the
capacity of stakeholders to recognise and
support young people who may be developing
a mental health problem.
• Developing the Safe and Inclusive Brimbank
2020-2024 strategy.
• Implementing recommendations arising from
the local homelessness research project.
• Introducing Community Impact Analysis
reports that detail the impact of COVID-19
on individuals, families and communities in
Brimbank to inform Council’s community and
service provider connections, response, social
policy and advocacy.
• Continuing building works that transition St
Albans Leisure Centre into a state-of-the-art
health and wellness centre.
Highlights of the year (continued)
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
12
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
13
Highlights of the year (continued)
Our Goal:
A Prosperous Community
Strategic objectives:
• People are able to access quality
education and lifelong learning
opportunities
• People are able to find and maintain
jobs that provide income security
• The local economy is strong and
provides opportunities for the
community to thrive
• Housing is of good quality, well
located and affordable
• Brimbank is a leading destination
for business, working, learning,
recreation and living
Key Achievements
• Delivering Year Three of the Public Art
Strategy 2018-2023.
• Providing meaningful work experiences that
increase employment opportunities for young
people experiencing barriers to employment
as per the Year Three Actions of the Youth
Jobs Strategy (2018-2023)
• Working to transform Council’s
Neighbourhood Houses and Community
Centres into sites of belonging and learning
for people from all backgrounds and life
stages through the development of the
Neighbourhood House Strategy (2019-2024).
• Implementing Year One of the Brimbank
Library Strategy (2020-2025) and the
Strategic Framework for Library Collections
(2020-2025) collections, programs,
community engagement and online services.
• Successfully delivering the 2021 Brimbank
Writers & Readers Festival.
• Adding a new streaming platform of
eResources, giving the community access to
new collections of digital TV shows, movies,
eComics and eMusic, as well as greater access
to eBooks and eAudiobooks.
• Launching a new wellbeing kit collection
at Brimbank libraries, offering the
community access to resources designed
to support a variety of activities for
people living with cognitive impairments,
visual and dexterity challenges.
• Implementing a large variety of support
for young people and adults to gain
employment skills.
• Delivering the Learning for Earning
Festival which focused on learning
employment, skills.
• Promoting reading, literacy and
positive social connections through
the Little Libraries Community Book
Exchange with three structures located
throughout the municipality.
• Securing a $660,000 grant from the
Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions
to employ Jobs Victoria Advocates (JAs). The
JAs will help people who have lost their jobs
due to the effects of the pandemic and the
long-term unemployed to access employment
services, training opportunities and other
support.
• Implementing the Year Two Actions in
the Brimbank Heritage Strategy including
ongoing digital promotion of heritage
destinations.
• Continuing implementation of the
Brimbank Economic Development Strategy
Implementation Plan.
• Delivering the Brimbank Activation Program
‘Enjoy Local’ across Brimbank Local Activity
Centres.
• Implementing business support activities
identified in the Brimbank COVID-19
Response and Recovery Strategy including
ongoing administration of the COVID-19
Business Recovery Grants Program and the
business activation program.
• Implementing Year Two Actions identified in
the Go St Albans Action Plan 2019 including
communications and engagement, marketing
and business development, streetscape
improvements and promotion of investment
opportunities.
• Delivering a range of initiatives from the
Experience Brimbank Visitor Strategy
including the promotion of the Brimbank
Think. Shop. Buy Local campaign.
• Continuing to support and promote the
operation of iHarvest Co-working Sunshine to
provide a vibrant and affordable co-working
location for start-ups, entrepreneurs,
freelancers and business.
• Coordinating implementation of Year Three
initiatives within the Experience Brimbank
Visitor Strategy.
• Implementing life stage priority actions
identified in the Brimbank Lifelong Learning
Strategy (2018-2023) that focus on cross
sector collaboration aiming to improve
learning outcomes for children and adults
• Reviewing and developing strategic plans
and planning policies to facilitate appropriate
development in line with the Transforming
Brimbank 2020 Agenda, and the Brimbank
Response Strategy to the Western Rail
Plan including Melbourne Airport Rail and
Sunshine Super Hub.
Future Initiatives
• Prioritise digital inclusion strategies for
vulnerable groups through targeted
engagement and training programs to
improve skills and enhance wellbeing.
• Implement and evaluate the Victorian Job
Advocates program to support young people
and others facing barriers to gain access to
training and employment opportunities.
• Develop and commence implementation of
the Local Jobs for Local People Program.
• Support and promote procurement of
localised products and services via Brimbank
Localised, a business-to-business platform.
• In collaboration with partners deliver
programs and services at Brimbank Learning
Futures that support re-engagement with
education, training and employment.
01 Introduction
I
Highlights of the year
Our Goal:
An Innovative and Responsive
‘Community First’ Council
Strategic objectives:
• Council is fair, honest and
transparent
• Council advocates and works in the
interests of our community
• Council manages its assets
and finances sustainably and
responsibly
• Council staff are high-performing
and community-focused
Key Achievements
• Continuing to implement the Councillor
Portfolio Program.
• Reviewing and implementing the Annual
Budget and Long Term Financial Plan in
accordance with legislative requirements.
• Implementing the Year Two Actions from the
Brimbank Innovation Framework Action Plan,
to deliver on the needs of the community
now and into the future.
• Developing and executing an implementation
plan for
Local Government Act 2020
amendments.
• Continuing to implement the Council General
Election 2020 Plan and induction program.
• Establishing systems and procedures
to enable Councillors to participate in
Council Meetings by electronic means
of communication (as permitted by the
COVID-19 Omnibus (Emergency Measures)
Act 2020)
during the COVID-19 pandemic,
including by providing all requisite training
and technological resources and support.
• Providing the community with increased
awareness and assistance in using both
online services including ‘Live Chat’ and self
service options to access information.
• Implementing ongoing marketing activities
through the ‘We are Brimbank’ brand to
promote People, Pride and Places in Brimbank.
• Continuing to implement a range of advocacy
initiatives identified and prioritised within the
Brimbank Advocacy Plan and Framework.
• Continuing to work in partnership with a
range of stakeholders to implement the
Brimbank Response and Recovery Strategy.
• Reporting on outcomes of annual Local
Government Community Satisfaction Survey.
• Implementing the Communication Strategy
to promote and position Council’s services,
assets and community through the
production of collateral in easy English
and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
languages.
• Implementing the year two actions in the
Brimbank People Strategy that aim to
attract, recruit and retain highly skilled and
experienced people to work for Council.
• Developing and implementing the Community
Engagement Policy that guides best practice
and effective community engagement
.
Future Initiatives
• Implement Emergency Management Planning
Reform at municipal level.
• Implement Brimbank’s Coronavirus (COVID-19)
Response and Recovery Strategy – Stage 2.
• Continue to execute the Implementation Plan
for
Local Government Act 2020
amendments.
• Implement various service channels that
enable residents to seek service information,
register and track requests, update
information and make payments at a time
that suits them.
• Implement a range of advocacy initiatives
identified and priorities within the Brimbank
Advocacy Plan and Framework that help
improve community outcomes with respect to
Brimbank’s People, Places, and Prosperity.
• Deliver the We are Brimbank Awards and use
Council communication channels to celebrate
and recognise the people and places in
Brimbank that enhance community pride.
Highlights of the year (continued)
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
14
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
15
Opportunities and challenges
Our population is evolving
The population of Melbourne’s Western
Metropolitan Region is rapidly growing, with
Brimbank positioned to be at the very heart
of its future expansion. While the Western
Metropolitan Region currently has a population
of approximately 964,000, by 2051 this is
projected to rise to 1.75 million, much of which
will occur in the growth areas directly to the
west and north of Brimbank.
The challenges of shifting demographics,
government policy and service model reforms,
and ensuring social equity and access
in a constrained fiscal environment, are
transforming the way in which services and
infrastructure are funded and delivered.
Social justice
Brimbank’s social, economic and cultural
diversity means we need to understand the
needs of different cultures and lifestyles. Council
will continue to work towards addressing
complex issues that arise from systemic
disadvantage. We have formed many multi
agency partnerships to support our work.
Cultural diversity
Brimbank prides itself on its cultural diversity,
embracing more than 160 nationalities
from around the globe. Brimbank has a rich
Indigenous history, going back to when the
Wurundjeri People first inhabited the region,
thriving in the Maribyrnong Valley.
As one of Melbourne’s most culturally diverse
communities, Brimbank has a wide range of
cultural traditions and arts practice including
dance, music and visual art. Diversity is central
to our identity – we are proudly multicultural,
embracing people from around the world and
weaving their stories into our own.
Our spaces are transforming
The $10 billion commitment towards
constructing the Melbourne Airport Rail
Project via Sunshine provides a transformative
opportunity to unlock the limitless potential of
Melbourne’s West.
Brimbank City Council is excited about the new
job, education, health and fairness opportunities
associated with the development of the
Sunshine Priority Precinct, the Sunshine Super
Hub and major transport projects associated
with the Melbourne Airport Rail Project,
Western Rail Plan and Suburban Rail Loop. This
once-in-a-generation investment provides the
opportunity to address key social challenges by
delivering fair outcomes for locals.
Brimbank Aquatic and Wellness Centre
The Brimbank Aquatic and Wellness Centre will
be a vibrant, welcoming multi-generational
facility, designed to become the active health
hub for not only Brimbank, but the entire
western metropolitan region.
The Centre demonstrates an innovative
approach, aimed at tackling the complex issues
of improving the health and wellbeing of the
Brimbank community. An Australian first, the
Centre will integrate aquatic/ leisure services
with social/ health support services with an
outcomes focus.
Climate change
Climate change is an immediate, real, all
encompassing threat, and an appropriate
science-based, coordinated, public policy
response is the only responsible course of
action.
Council’s declaration of a climate emergency is a
bold but necessary action that sees ‘socially just’
climate action as a necessity, to be undertaken
at scale and speed.
In Brimbank, health, equity, energy,
infrastructure, the natural environment and the
material economy are the core areas that will be
affected by climate change.
Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact
on the Brimbank community, compounding
existing issues of high levels of disadvantage
and vulnerability. Some people, who managed
in the short term, now confront a much longer
period without work, with reduced income,
reliance on income support, or no income at all.
For many, changing restrictions and uncertain
timelines have added to the pressures of
running a business, working from home, home
schooling and/or caring for vulnerable family
members and small children.
While restrictions protect health, the sustained
closure of business, services and networks
reinforced social isolation and, for some, reduced
access to basic material needs, including care,
support and connection to the community.
The safety, health, wellbeing and economic
welfare of our residents and staff remains
Council’s top priority. Brimbank’s COVID-19
Response and Recovery Strategy – Stage 2
outlines the important role Council plays to
assist our local businesses and residents during
the pandemic and as we recover and rebuild.
01 Introduction
I
Opportunities and challenges | Brimbank COVID-19 relief and recovery snapshot
Brimbank COVID-19 relief and recovery snapshot
The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic
has resulted in the most significant global
public health and economic challenge we
have faced in over a century. It has fast
become the most serious and pressing
public health, social and economic issue
facing our local community.
On 11 March 2020, the World Health
Organisation declared COVID-19 as a global
pandemic, with the Victorian Government
declaring a State of Emergency on the 14
March 2020.
Brimbank City Council adopted the
Brimbank Coronavirus (COVID-19)
Response and Recovery Strategy in April
2020 in response to these unprecedented
developments. This whole-of-council
approach helped combat the spread of
COVID-19 across Brimbank and the broader
community.
The implementation of this strategy
focused on the following pillars:
1. Health and Wellbeing Response
2. Community Support Response
(Financial Hardship and Resources)
3. Economic Development Response
4. Economic Stimulus Response
We have seen substantial health, economic and
social impacts in our municipality, as well as
innovation, adaptation and collaboration. Strict
and changing restrictions aimed at alleviating
the spread of COVID-19 have disrupted
Brimbank businesses and communities but also
highlighted the resilience and strength within
our diverse municipality.
In response to the prolonged and major impact
of COVID-19 on the Brimbank community, a
Response and Recovery Strategy – Stage 2 was
adopted by Council in April 2021.
This Stage 2 strategy was developed using
multiple methods of engagement with
residents, partner organisations, the State
Government and the business sector, seeking
advice to assist Council in understanding
community and business recovery needs.
The Brimbank Response and Recovery Strategy
– Stage 2 outlines how Council can assist our
local businesses, residents and visitors to
overcome obstacles and build on strengths as
we continue to recover, rebuild and adjust to a
‘COVID normal’ through:
1. Prioritising health and wellbeing
2. Building economic resilience
3. Supporting community resilience and equity
4. Activating public space
5. Monitoring, measuring and reviewing both
the COVID-19 situation and impact on
community
This whole-of-council Strategy is designed to
ensure that Council resources, programs and
initiatives continue to assist in responding to
the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. It works
to mobilise the pride, diversity and support that
exist in Brimbank to strengthen community
recovery.
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
16
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
17
The year in review
Message from the Mayor
I am proud of the work Council has
done over the last year to support
our community through the ongoing
pandemic, to advocate for its needs
and help build a brighter future for
Brimbank.
As a newly elected Councillor and Mayor, I am
deeply committed to working to make Brimbank
a better place for all and this commitment is
shared by my fellow Councillors.
And that is exactly what we have done!
Together, over the last 12 months we have seen
significant investment, stronger advocacy and
outcomes delivered for Brimbank more than
ever before.
The new Council that took office in November
2020 includes seven first-time Councillors and
this brought a fresh perspective and renewed
zeal for Council’s efforts to get the best
outcomes for our community.
Council’s focus has been on:
• Supporting our community through the
pandemic and advocating for government
help to support the COVID-19 recovery our
community needed in a pandemic-impacted
environment
• Advocating to get the best outcomes for our
City from the big infrastructure projects being
planned by the State and Federal Governments,
and
• Planning for the future needs of our community
and how to unlock investment, economic,
health and jobs potential across Brimbank
COVID-19 response and recovery
Supporting our community through the
prolonged COVID-19 pandemic has been a
massive focus for Council.
As part of this, Council secured almost $120
million in state and federal investment towards a
range of projects and initiatives that will provide
a pathway for economic and social recovery from
the impacts of COVID-19.
Council’s COVID-19 response and recovery work
was guided by two key plans:
• A new 19 Point Action Plan for COVID-19
Recovery and Response, adopted in August
2020, which provides government and
non-government entities with a clear
pathway to partner with Council to help
address the health, wellbeing and economic
consequences of the ongoing pandemic.
• The Stage 2 Brimbank Response and
Recovery Strategy, adopted in March 2021,
which outlines how Council can assist
local businesses, residents and visitors to
overcome obstacles and build on strengths as
we continue to recover, rebuild and adjust to a
COVID normal.
Planning and advocating
Key highlights include adopting the bold and
ambitious
Sunshine Priority Precinct Vision
2050
in April 2021, to transform the working
class area into a 21st century city through
leveraging the Melbourne Airport Rail and other
mega infrastructure investment.
This landmark document for our Council and
our community outlines a plan to help unlock
up to $8 billion of investment and development
potential and create between 20,000 and
50,000 new jobs across the precinct over the
next 30 years.
The Vision was developed after extensive
engagement with our community and key
stakeholders, and gained wide-ranging support.
Council also advocated strongly for the best
outcomes for Brimbank from the
Melbourne
Airport Rail
project, as this can be an absolute
game changer for Brimbank.
Council urged the State Government to re-affirm
its commitment to transform Sunshine Station
into a Super Hub, and reconsider plans for a
flyover through Albion as part of Melbourne
Airport Rail.
As Mayor, I also led a strong campaign calling for
the State and Federal Governments to
‘Fix the
Calder’
and had some huge wins.
This included securing $100 million from the
State and Federal Governments to fix the Calder
and getting state government commitment to
removing the
Calder Park Drive level crossing
on the Sunbury line, which addresses one of the
key asks of our campaign. These are welcome
steps towards fixing one of the most dangerous
roads in Victoria.
Council also spotlighted Brimbank at a national
level at the
Australian Local Government
Association National General Assembly
(ALGA)
in Canberra, in June 2021. This was a
crucial opportunity to influence ALGA’s federal
government advocacy, to ensure it aligns with
Brimbank priorities – such as jobs, climate
change and affordable housing.
Investing in facilities, City spaces and
reducing carbon footprint
Over the 2020-2021 year, Council invested
a significant $79.66 million to deliver new
facilities, upgrade existing ones, and upgrade
our roads, parks and open spaces. This delivered
facilities and spaces our community can enjoy
using and that meet their needs.
A key project was construction of the new
Brimbank Aquatic and Wellness Centre
on
the site of the former St Albans Leisure Centre in
Keilor Downs. We look forward to delivering this
new centre by mid-2022.
Council also focused on protecting the environment
and building healthy and resilient communities.
Council continued powering towards its goal of
zero emissions
in its operations by 2030. In
May 2021, Council signed a contract to power
all of its buildings, sports grounds, community
venues, leisure centres and street lights by 100
per cent renewable electricity.
I’m proud to say Brimbank was one of 46
Victorian councils to form VECO, the Victorian
Energy Collaboration – the largest emissions
reduction project ever undertaken by the local
government sector in Australia.
Creating a more sustainable Brimbank is an
ongoing priority for Brimbank.
Future priorities
Our key priorities for Brimbank are boosting jobs,
health, fairness and education.
As a Council we look forward to continuing to
work with our community and other stakeholders
and advocate strongly for our community’s
needs to achieve a transformed Brimbank that is
beautiful, thriving, healthy and connected.
We will continue to work to address priority issues
for our community, support COVID-19 recovery and
make the most of opportunities available.
This includes getting the best outcome for our
community from key infrastructure projects
led by other levels of government, whether it is
building a better Calder Freeway or advocating
for the Sunshine Priority Precinct Vision 2050 to
be delivered to Brimbank’s benefit.
Thank you
I would like to take this opportunity to thank the
outgoing CEO Helen Morrissey who retired in July
after 11 years with Council, including almost four
as CEO.
Thank you also to my fellow Councillors for
working beside me with the shared vision of a
brighter future for Brimbank.
I’d also like to thank Council staff who have
worked with commitment and innovation
to serve the community and help build a
#BetterBrimbank.
Cr Ranka Rasic
Mayor, Brimbank City Council
Chief Executive Officer’s message
On behalf of Brimbank City Council,
I am pleased to introduce the
2020-2021 Annual Report.
The past year has presented challenges
and uncertainties – but also opportunities.
Brimbank has responded with courage and
creativity in the way we serve our vibrant,
growing and diverse community in the heart
of Melbourne’s west.
Throughout 2020-2021, our focus has been on
helping our community, particularly vulnerable
residents, to navigate the impacts of the
pandemic, as well as on longer-term social and
economic recovery for our whole community.
Brimbank was hard-hit by the pandemic. Case
numbers were high in our community, which is
among Victoria’s most diverse with high existing
levels of disadvantage.
Throughout the year Council supported
businesses and vulnerable community members
with a range of measures including rates relief,
a zero per cent rates increase, COVID-19 support
services, grants, and supporting local cafes and
restaurants to safely prepare for outdoor dining.
Key pillars of this support included Council’s
$300,000 Community Recovery Grants
Program for innovative community-led and
community based initiatives that support
COVID-19 recovery, and the $300,000
Business Recovery Grants Program to support
local start-ups and small businesses to adapt
and respond to COVID-19.
This work was guided by the Brimbank
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Response and Recovery
Strategy, and Council’s 19 Point Action Plan for
COVID-19 Recovery and Response.
I am grateful for the way our Councillors, council
officers, stakeholders, partner organisations and
staff members have responded to uncertainty
with resilience and adaptability – continuing to
put our community first. Throughout lockdowns,
we have adapted the way we work in order
to maintain essential services and important
connections for our community.
Alongside this work, Brimbank continued to
respond to the normal and expected constraints
facing councils across Victoria, including
rate capping, shifting demographics, and
government policy and service model reforms.
An ongoing challenge in local government
is to balance the provision of high-quality
services and infrastructure now and into
the future, with the fiscally constrained
environment we work in. The organisation’s
financial position remains sound. Council
achieved a surplus of $24.7 million in 2020-
2021, which compares favourably to the
budgeted surplus of $$0.897 million.
Capital works projects will be key to Brimbank’s
recovery from the pandemic, and in continuing
to meet our community’s changing needs and
population growth moving forward from this
crisis. We know that community infrastructure
helps to build community resilience, and with
that in mind, Brimbank continues to focus on
urban renewal as a driver for COVID-19 recovery.
During 2020-2021, Council delivered a healthy
$79.66 million capital works program (including
$18.38 million carried forward from 2019-2020).
This included $28.8 million for the new state-of
the-art Brimbank Aquatic and Wellness Centre,
on the site of the old St Albans Leisure Centre,
as part of $38.54 million invested in sports
facilities upgrades across Brimbank. Council also
invested $5.03 million in the transformation of
town centres such as Sunshine and St Albans,
and $2.73 million in open space projects in parks
and gardens across Brimbank.
In August 2020, Council endorsed an ambitious
proposal to transform Brimbank into the
powerhouse of Melbourne’s west by 2050.
Leading with Vision, Transforming Brimbank
Future Priorities 2050 demonstrates a
pathway for economic and social recovery from
COVID-19 by articulating opportunities for
future investment across the city. This includes
leveraging major infrastructure projects, such
as Melbourne Airport Rail, and generating
unprecedented business, job, health, education
and social opportunities.
Brimbank’s 2020-2021 advocacy helped to
secure more than $160 million in State and
Federal Government investments in our
community, including the State and Federal
Governments each committing $50 million
for much-needed improvements to the
Calder Freeway in response to Brimbank’s
‘Fix the Calder’ campaign.
Council will continue to advocate both the
State and Federal Governments to advance our
community and future priorities for Brimbank.
The past year also saw the election of a new
Council. Eleven Councillors, including seven
first-time Councillors, were sworn in for a four
year term on Tuesday 10 November 2020. It has
been exciting and inspiring to work with a group
of people who are passionate about serving our
community. I wish to thank our Councillors for
working alongside us to represent the views
of their communities, and for the way they
have embraced their important role in decision
making and community advocacy. I’d also like to
thank the outgoing Council for their leadership
and setting a solid foundation from which we
were able to achieve positive outcomes under
exceptional circumstances.
To our community members who support,
work, volunteer and advocate with Council
led activities – thank you for your continued
support, passion and enthusiasm for Brimbank
and our work.
Helen Morrissey
Chief Executive Officer
01 Introduction
I
The year in review | Message from the Mayor
I
Chief Executive Officer’s message
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
image
0
5000
10000
15000
20000
25000
30000
Adjusted underlying surplus / (decit) $'000
26,528
12,557
6,005
19,607
2016-17 2017-18
2018-19 2019-20
2020-21
4,626
0
50
100
150
200
250
Working capital ratio (%)
219.37
161.79
174.23
2016-17 2017-18
2018-19 2019-20
2020-21
182.94
234.55
0 5
15
25
35
45
10
20
30
40
50 60
Debt ratio (%)
42
42
40
40
52
2016-17 2017-18
2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
0 20
40 60
80 100
120
Asset renewal (%)
103
68
66
87
2016-17 2017-18
2018-19
2019-20 2020-21
107
0 10
20 30
40 50
60 70
80
Rate concentration (%)
73
69
73
78
76
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
2019-20
2020-21
18
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
19
01 Introduction
I
Financial summary
Financial summary
The 2020-2021 financial year
results reflect Council’s ongoing
commitment to financial and
infrastructure sustainability as
outlined in Council’s Long Term
Financial Plan.
Council’s financial position continues to remain
sound. Detailed information relating to Council’s
financial performance is included within
the Financial Statements and Performance
Statement sections of this report.
Council manages over $2.4 billion in assets.
These comprise land, building and other
infrastructure assets such as roads, footpaths
and bike paths and drainage.
Operating position
Council achieved a surplus of $24.7 million in
2020-2021. This surplus compares favourably
to the budgeted surplus of $0.897 million. The
adjusted underlying surplus of Council, after
removing non-recurrent capital grants, cash
capital contributions and non-monetary capital
contributions, is $6.0 million. Sustaining an
adjusted underlying surplus is a critical financial
strategy that provides capacity to renew the
$2.4 billion in community assets under Council’s
control, and build new infrastructure to meet
the expectations of our growing community.
Liquidity
The working capital ratio, which assesses
Council’s ability to meet current commitments,
is calculated by measuring Council’s current
assets as a percentage of current liabilities.
Council’s result of 174.23 per cent is an indicator
of satisfactory financial position and is in line
with the expected target band of 100 per cent
to 400 per cent.
Obligations
Council aims to ensure that it is able to
maintain its infrastructure assets at the
expected levels, while at the same time
continuing to deliver the services needed by
the community.
At the end of the 2020-2021 year Council’s
debt ratio, which is measured by comparing
interest bearing loans and borrowings to rate
revenue, was 52 per cent, which was within
the expected target band of 20-60 per cent.
Council’s asset renewal ratio, which is
measured by comparing asset renewal
expenditure to depreciation, was 107 per cent,
which was within the expected target band of
90-110 per cent.
Stability and efficiency
Council raises a wide range of revenues
including rates, user fees, fines, grants and
contributions. Despite this, Council’s rates
concentration, which compares rate revenue
to adjusted underlying revenue, was 78 per
cent for the 2020-2021 year, which is towards
the top end of the expected target band of
40-80 per cent. The average residential rate
per residential assessment was $1,668, which
compares favourably to similar Councils in the
outer metropolitan area.
Economic factors
Rate capping
The Victorian Government imposed a rate cap
on all Victorian councils of 2.0 per cent for
the 2020-2021 year. Brimbank City Council
increased rates by zero per cent.
State Government landfill levy
The State Government landfill levy increased by
zero per cent in 2020-2021.
Labour cost increases
Wage inflation rates for the 2020-2021 year
were as per Council Enterprise Bargaining
Agreement (EBA 8) of 2.20 per cent. The June
2021 Consumer Price Index (CPI) rate was 3.8
per cent.
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
20
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
21
01 Introduction
I
Description of operations
I
Major changes
Description of operations
Brimbank City Council provides a
range of services and programs that
reflect the needs and expectations
of the community.
The Annual Budget 2020-2021 focused on
delivering value to the community in a rate
capped environment.
It was designed as a financially responsible
budget that aimed at minimising the impact
of the constraint on revenue raising while
continuing to deliver quality projects and
services for the Brimbank community.
The budget attempted to strike a balance
between maintaining current levels of service,
reducing operational costs and reviewing the
way some programs are delivered.
Council’s operations are broad ranging and
include managing roads and infrastructure,
waste and environment services, public
facilities, the community’s wellbeing and other
services and programs. Community take-up
of the services and programs shows the
importance of these Council functions.
The Council Plan 2017-2021 (adopted in August
2017) outlines Council’s Strategic Directions,
which are supported by a number of other
Council strategies, plans and policies. This
includes the Annual Budget 2020-2021, which
highlights project priorities and spending.
Council’s Strategic Objectives are monitored
by a set of service performance indicators and
measures. They offer a corporate framework
for the delivery of services, facilities, support
and advocacy, and for achieving the vision
and objectives outlined in the Brimbank
Community Plan. The Council Plan sets out
Council’s key strategic directions and actions
for a four-year period.
Council’s actions are guided by Victorian and
Australian legislation which supports good
governance and enables Council to responsibly
deliver a community first approach.
Major capital works
During 2020-2021, Council delivered a $79.66
million capital works program (including $18.38
million carried forward from 2019-2020). Major
capital works projects included:
Roads, footpaths and pedestrian facilities
and traffic management works
Council delivered a $23.93 million road works
and $1.91 million traffic management program,
which continued the implementation of the
Roads Management Plan, designed to manage
Brimbank’s road network in a safe, sustainable
and financially responsible way.
Key highlights included:
• Road pavement rehabilitation projects,
including forward design ($15.384 million)
• Road pavement asphalt overlay projects -
various locations ($5.044 million)
• Footpath rehabilitation program - various
locations ($2.195 million)
• Road works associated with the St Albans
Leisure Centre Upgrade ($661,080)
• Kerb replacement for property access
($639,931)
• Local area traffic management works in
Ardeer ($561,080)
• Deer Park local area traffic management
projects ($361,595)
Town centre works
Council progressed a range of works to the value
of $5.03 million to improve amenity, connectivity
and ambience in town centres. These projects
included:
• Sunshine Town Centre Hampshire Road -
Stage 3 upgrade ($3.285 million)
• Medium sized activity centres - place
upgrades ($491,314)
• Devonshire Road pedestrian signals
($275,064)
• Clarke Street - formalisation of footpath
eastern side ($253,029)
• Town Centre lighting strategy ($193,368)
• St Albans Town Centre - Victoria University/
McKechnie Street Link ($153,748)
Sports facilities
Council continued to invest $38.54 million
in upgrading sporting facilities across the
municipality to help improve health and
wellbeing outcomes in the community. A range
of these projects were completed, including:
• St Albans Leisure Centre, Keilor Downs -
redevelopment ($28.867 million)
• More Park Stage 1 - New Sports Pavilion and
Car Park Upgrade ($1.700 million)
• Bon Thomas Reserve Pavilion ($1.453 million)
• Rolling sports surface/ground reconstruction
program ($1.372 million)
• Delahey Reserve New Sports Pavilion -
Delahey ($1.217 million)
• Sports reserve lighting upgrade program
($1.015 million)
• Female Sports Facilities Upgrades ($677,025)
• More Park Stage 2 Sports Facility Upgrades
($396,705)
• Female SF Upgrade-Keilor Park Synth
($380,089)
• Churchill Reserve - car park construction
($315,678)
• Errington Reserve Sports Ground Lighting
Upgrade Program ($237,679)
Parks, playground and open space upgrades
Council spent $2.73 million on open space projects,
including the ongoing implementation of the
award-winning Creating Better Parks – Open
Space and Playground Policy and Plan. This
plan and policy is ensuring Council meets the
needs of existing and future communities by
creating an attractive, integrated, accessible and
comprehensive open space network for Brimbank.
Highlights included the completion and/or
continuation of works at these parks:
• Suburban Park upgrade program ($551,001)
• The Lakes Reserve, Taylors Lakes - Flagship
Park upgrade ($393,258)
• Neighbourhood Park upgrade program
($379,793)
• Public toilets ($239,899)
• Fenced dog off-leash park ($200,551)
• Park playground renewal program ($172,697)
• Park and street furniture response program
($170,798)
• Local reserves upgrade program ($151,789)
Sustainability projects
Council seeks to build a legacy of sustainability
to enable an engaged and resilient community
that supports a sustainable environment
containing rich social, economic and
environmental characteristics. Council invested
$1.04 million in sustainability programs
including:
• Water security program ($658,156)
• Sunshine Energy Park, Albion and Carrington
Drive Reserve Albion ($171,427)
Bike paths and shared paths
Council completed a range of bike paths and
shared paths projects worth $0.92 million to
connect Brimbank, including the following:
• Replace poor condition shared trails
segments identified through inspection
audits and community feedback ($364,853)
• Local cycle route connection program
($238,748)
• Sydenham Rail Corridor Bicycle Track
($125,368)
Construction has also progressed for works
on the Sydenham Rail Corridor Bicycle Track
($194,362), an off-road cycling route linking
the Sydenham, St Albans and Sunshine
town centres.
Community facilities
Council invested $1.371 million in improvements
to community facilities, such as neighbourhood
houses, libraries and children’s centres,
to provide suitable spaces for community
activities. This includes improvements to
kitchens, heating/cooling systems, storage,
flooring and playgrounds.
Drainage rehabilitation
Council spent $1.160 million on drainage
rehabilitation, including underground drainage
upgrades, installation of water quality devices
and minor improvement works.
Providing services during the
COVID-19 pandemic
The continuing coronavirus (COVID-19)
pandemic, as well as frequent lockdowns
for Metropolitan Melbourne and
associated restrictions, meant Council
had to work differently to continue
providing services to the community.
Through much of the year Council
office staff worked remotely from
home, while staff delivering essential
services continued to do so in a safe
and permitted manner. Staff from
Council centres that had to shut were
redeployed to deliver essential services
as well as services to vulnerable
members of the community.
Council also continued to deliver several
services in different ways, to ensure
that while Council facilities remained
shut, community members still received
services online or in innovative ways.
Online programs and classes, services
such as Library to Your Door and Click
and Collect services, and active online
options continued to be made available
for residents.
Major changes
Additional staff through State
Government’s Working for Victoria
initiative
Brimbank secured up to $8 million to
employ more than 150 local unemployed
people to deliver and work on Council
projects and initiatives in response
to COVID-19, as part of the Victorian
Government’s Working for Victoria
initiative.
The additional temporary staff worked
with Council for a six-month period,
supporting Council to maintain and
expand its grassroots services through
the COVID-19 crisis.
Resignation of CEO
On 19 May 2021 CEO Helen Morrissey
announced she would be retiring as
Council CEO effective 15 July 2021.
Following a Special Council Meeting on 6
July 2021 Warren Roberts was appointed
the interim CEO. Mr Roberts stepped out
of retirement to take up the position
while a recruitment process takes place
for the ongoing role.
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
22
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
23
01 Introduction
I
Our Council
I
About the Councillors
HARVESTER
GRASSLANDS
HORSESHOE BEND
TAYLORS
The current Brimbank City Council
was elected on 6 November 2020.
The Council was sworn in for a
four-year term and took an oath
at an official ceremony on Tuesday
10 November 2020 that was live
streamed to the public.
Brimbank Council is comprised of 11 Councillors
elected from one two-councillor ward and three
wards that are three-councillor.
The 11 Councillors are the elected
representatives of all residents and ratepayers
across Brimbank. They have responsibility
for setting the strategic direction for the
municipality, policy development, identifying
service standards and monitoring performance
across the organisation. The Councillors are
listed on the next page.
Our Council
About the Councillors
Grasslands Ward
Cr Sarah Branton
Date elected: 6 November 2020
Cr Branton has been volunteering and
working on native grasslands in Brimbank for
over six years, and now lives locally to work
in her favourite ecosystem. She is committed
to causes including mental health support,
protection of grasslands, open green spaces
and lowering youth unemployment. Cr
Branton aims to increase Council’s connection
with the community, find ways to engage
with young people in enabling and exciting
ways, create more local job and training
opportunities, and provide mental health
support in multiple languages.
Committees
• Brimbank Disability Advisory Committee
(Co-Chair)
• Social Justice Coalition
• Brooklyn Community Representative Group
• Audit and Risk Committee (substitute)
Portfolio
#HealthyBrimbank
E CrBranton@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0407 836 064
Cr Thuy Dang
Date elected: 6 November 2020
Cr Dang happily lives in Brimbank and for
over a decade has been involved with
community events including White Ribbon
Day, Clean-Up Australia Day for Brimbank and
other health, wellbeing and safety projects.
She is interested in multiculturalism and
is excited by Brimbank’s diversity. Cr Dang
understands the limitations of language and
wants to help break down language barriers,
and is committed to bringing about change
in this area.
Committees
• Brimbank Arts Advisory Committee (Chair)
• Brimbank Community Fund Committee
• Collective Action Committee
Portfolio
#VibrantBrimbank
E CrDang@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0437 744 803
Cr Victoria Borg
Date elected: 6 November 2020 (returned,
previously elected 22 October 2016)
Cr Borg is proud to have grown up in Brimbank,
having lived here since emigrating from Malta
in 1972. She is committed to building trust
between Council and the community and to
representing the people of Brimbank with
fairness and integrity. Cr Borg aims to increase
community involvement with Council, to support
mental health and improve educational services.
As a former educator she is passionate about
youth, and reaching better education, training
and employment outcomes.
Committees
• Brimbank Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Reconciliation Action Plan Consultative
Committee (Co-Chair)
• Brimbank Disability Advisory Committee
• Chief Executive Officer Employment Matters
Committee
Portfolio
#PeopleBrimbank
E CrBorg@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0429 365 527
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
image
24
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
25
01 Introduction
I
About the Councillors
Harvester Ward
Cr Sam David JP
Date elected: 6 November 2020 (returned,
previously elected 22 October 2016)
Previous terms: March 1997 to September 2009
Cr David is a long-time resident of Brimbank,
former Mayor and Deputy Mayor, and active
member in several community groups. He
believes Brimbank’s greatest strength is its rich
diversity. Cr David is concerned about housing
availability, affordability and employment; and
is committed to assisting senior citizens groups
and supporting young people to get involved
in sport.
Committees
• Audit and Risk Committee
• Brooklyn Community Representative Group
• Chief Executive Officer Employment Matters
Committee
• Safety Roundtable
• Sunshine Town Centre Partnership Group
Portfolio
#LiveableBrimbank
E CrDavid@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0429 355 239
Cr Trung Luu
Date elected: 6 November 2020
Cr Luu is a long-time resident of Brimbank, and
has a young family. He wants to ensure that a
sustainability urban development strategy is
entrenched in the city’s future planning policy.
His greatest concern for Brimbank is that not
enough attention and investment is being
allocated to the municipality by various levels
of government. He believes in stepping up
to overcome the hurdle, and to be part of the
solution not the problem. Cr Luu loves calling
Brimbank home.
Committees
• Brooklyn Industrial Precinct Strategy
Committee (Chair)
• Metropolitan Transport Forum
Portfolio
#ConnectingBrimbank
E CrLuu@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0437 826 450
Cr Jasmine Nguyen
(Deputy Mayor
6 November 2020-30 June 2021)
Date elected: 6 November 2020
Cr Nguyen was born and bred in Brimbank and
has lived, worked and volunteered here for
all of her life. She is passionate about giving
back to the community, and her most pressing
concern is helping Brimbank to recover from
the COVID-19 pandemic. Cr Nguyen strives
to address local youth disengagement and
unemployment, and take stronger action on
issues such as climate change and mental
health. Her aims include being a voice for the
youth and vulnerable culturally and linguistically
diverse (CALD) communities and to drive better
sustainable outcomes for future generations of
Brimbank.
Committees
• Brimbank Youth Council (Co-Chair)
• Brooklyn Community Representative Group
• Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) (State
Council) (substitute)
• Brimbank Community Fund Committee
(substitute)
• Local Government Working Group on
Gambling
Portfolio
#InnovationBrimbank
#ProsperousBrimbank
E CrNguyen@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0437 740 042
Horseshoe Bend Ward
Cr Virginia Tachos
Date elected: 6 November 2020 (returned,
previously elected 22 October 2016)
Cr Tachos lives and works in Brimbank and has
a proud history of volunteering and advocating
for the community. Building strong, sustainable
communities, listening to residents’ needs and
supporting harm minimisation through strong
advocacy for stricter gambling controls are
important to Cr Tachos. The COVID-19 pandemic
and the response and recovery phase are at the
forefront of her priorities, and she would like
to advocate for more funds for this vulnerable
community, especially in mental health, family
support, skills training and digital literacy.
Committees
• Australian Local Government Women’s
Association (Victorian Branch)
• Australian Mayoral Aviation Committee
• Collective Action Committee (Co-Chair)
• LeadWest Special Committee (Alternative)
• Local Government Working Group on
Gambling
• Municipal Emergency Management Plan
Committee
• Social Justice Coalition (Chair)
• St Albans Town Centre Partnership Group
Portfolio
#BrimbankCOVID-19ResponseandRecovery
E CrTachos@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0428 915 671
Cr Jae Papalia
Date elected: 6 November 2020
Cr Papalia is a Brimbank local and has lived here
all of her life. She sees cultural diversity as
Brimbank’s strength; a place where people can
come from near or far and seize opportunities
and build a life for their families. Cr Papalia is
passionate about investing in young people
including youth education, jobs and resources.
She wants to see better tree canopy coverage in
Brimbank, which is among the lowest in Greater
Melbourne and aims to build a cleaner, greener
Brimbank as we move into the future.
Committees
• Brimbank Arts Advisory Committee
• Brimbank Youth Council
• Chief Executive Officer Employment Matters
Committee
Portfolio
#SustainableBrimbank
E CrPapalia@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0437 838 710
About the Councillors (continued)
About the Councillors (continued)
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
image
26
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
27
Taylors Ward
Cr Ranka Rasic
(Mayor 6 November 2020-30 June 2021)
Date elected: 6 November 2020
Brimbank is special to Cr Rasic. It was her
first home when she came to Australia in the
90s, and it is the place where she sent her
children to local schools, where she gained
her first job and where she now runs her small
business. Connection to one another and being
included are stand out features of the Brimbank
community. Cr Rasic is a strong advocate and
she aims to address key issues including the
need for better local roads, improved community
and mental health services, additional parks and
creating a more sustainable and greener city,
while making sure Brimbank gets its fair share
of funding.
Committees
• Brimbank Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Reconciliation Action Plan Consultative
Committee (Co-Chair)
• Brimbank Arts Advisory Committee
• Calder Highway Improvement Committee
• Chief Executive Officer Employment Matters
Committee
• Collective Action Committee (Co-Chair)
• LeadWest Special Committee
• Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) (State
Council)
Portfolio
#ResilientBrimbank
E CrRasic@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0437 861 296
Cr Maria Kerr
Date elected: 6 November 2020
As a resident of Brimbank since 1986, Cr
Kerr is determined to make sure the western
suburbs are not neglected or overlooked, and
she is passionate about the community and
motivated to make Brimbank a better place
for all. Cr Kerr aims to attract more visitors
and investors to experience Brimbank’s rich
and diverse community and she would love
to see more open green spaces, parks with
updated equipment, and better services for
the disadvantaged, a focus on youth and the
widening of Taylors Road.
Committees
• Audit and Risk Committee
• Brimbank Disability Advisory Committee
• Western Melbourne Tourism Committee
Portfolio
#ProudBrimbank
E CrKerr@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0437 796 630
Cr Bruce Lancashire
Date elected: 6 November 2020 (returned,
previously elected 22 October 2016)
Cr Lancashire is a long term-resident of Brimbank
and he is passionate about its diverse people
and the vibrant community networks that make
it a great place to live. He has an ongoing desire
to help make the world a better place for future
generations. Disengaged youth, Aboriginal
people, health and wellbeing, the liveability
of places with population growth and low
investment, education, environment, economy
and jobs are all areas of concern and where Cr
Lancashire is determined to make a difference.
Committees:
• Heritage Advisory Committee (Chair)
• Metropolitan Local Government Waste
Management Forum
• Metropolitan Regional Landfill Community
Reference Group
Portfolios:
#ProsperousBrimbank
#InnovationBrimbank
E CrLancashire@brimbank.vic.gov.au
M 0429 637 689
About the Councillors (continued)
02
Our people
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
image
Executive
Program Manager
Aiden Mullen
CEO
Helen Morrissey
Director
City Development
Kelvin Walsh
Manager
City Compliance
John Petroro
Manager
City Strategy
Leanne Deans
Manager
City Planning
Kristen Gilbert
Manager
Environment
Matthew Aquilina
Manager
Building Services &
Environmental Health
Ashley Hansen
Director
Community
Wellbeing
Lynley Dumble
Manager
Community Care
John MacDonagh
Manager
Community Learning
& Participation
Christine McAllister
Manager
Leisure &
Community Facilities
Ashley Fleming
Acting Manager
Community Planning,
Culture & Dev
Glenn Menner
Community Projects
Manager
Rachel Deans
Director
Infrastructure
& City Services
Neil Whiteside
Manager
Urban Design
Adrian Gray
Group Manager
Operations
Tom Razmovski
Manager
Facilities &
Major Projects
Trent Prince
Manager
Asset & Property
Services
Dominic Di Martino
Manager
Engineering
Services
Adrian Ashford
Director
Organisational
Excellence
Shane Marr
Manager
Business Support
Shane Buckley
Manager
Financial Services
Andrew Brae
Executive Ocer
Lead West
Sue La Greca
Manager
Projects &
Innovation
Pallav Ahuja
Manager
People &
Performance
Yvette Fuller
DIrector Advocacy
Partnerships and
Community
Engagement
Daniel Hogan
Acting Manager
Customer Service
Aamanda Rigby
Manager
Media &
Communications
Rebecca Solomon
Manager
Governance
Julian Sakarai
28
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
29
02 Our people
I
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2021
I
Organisation structure at 30 June 2021
Executive Management Team at 30 June 2021
Kelvin Walsh
Director City Development
Kelvin is an experienced director, who has
worked in fields including planning, urban
design, business development and place
making in Australia and overseas. He has varied
experience in local and state government and
the private sector.
Kelvin commenced with Brimbank City
Council in May 2018 and his brief is to create
a great place where people want to live,
raise their families and participate in active
community life. Kelvin has a passion for the
west, particularly Brimbank and its exciting
transformation.
Bachelor of Applied Science (Planning),
Bachelor of Architecture (Honours), Master of
Metropolis (Architecture and Urban Culture),
Executive Master of Public Administration.
Lynley Dumble
Director Community Wellbeing
Lynley is an experienced local government
professional who has worked in
Melbourne’s west for over 20 years.
Her areas of focus have included social
policy analysis and development, public
health research, community engagement,
strategic advocacy, community
infrastructure planning, family, youth
and children services, arts and cultural
development, stakeholder management
and community capacity building programs.
Lynley commenced with Brimbank
City Council in August 2016. In April
2020, Lynley was appointed Acting
Director Community Wellbeing and was
permanently appointed in December 2020
into the role.
Master of Public Health, Diploma of
Applied Science, Graduate Diploma Health
Promotion and Education.
Helen Morrissey
CEO
With over 35 years’ experience in local
government, Helen joined Brimbank in
November 2010 as Director Corporate and
Community Relations. Previously Helen
was the General Manager of Corporate
Services at Maribyrnong City Council. Helen
has worked in a variety of management
roles in both community services and
corporate areas at Darebin City Council.
Helen was appointed Chief Executive
Officer at Brimbank City Council on 20
December 2017.
Graduate Diploma in Social Science, Diploma
Human Service Research & Evaluation,
Certificate of Marketing Practice, Graduate of
the Australian Institute of Company Directors.
Neil Whiteside
Director Infrastructure and City Services
Neil is an experienced senior executive and
has worked in local government for over 20
years in various management roles.
In October 2015, Neil was appointed to the
position of Director Infrastructure and City
Services. He previously held the position of
Director Community Wellbeing from June
2012, and preceding that held the position
of Group Manager Operations at Council from
January 2008. Prior to joining Brimbank,
Neil held several management positions at
Whittlesea City Council.
Bachelor of Education/Environmental Science,
Masters in Environmental Science and
Williamson Leadership Fellow. Neil is currently
completing a Masters of Public Policy and
Management.
Shane Marr
Director Organisational Excellence
Shane has over 30 years’ experience in
governance and finance roles in both local
government and the private sector.
Shane commenced with Brimbank City
Council in late 2014, and his role covers the
responsibilities of Finance, Business Support,
Projects and Innovation, and People and
Performance.
Prior to joining Brimbank, Shane held the
position of General Manager Corporate
Services at Moorabool Shire Council.
Bachelor of Business, Graduate Diploma in
Accounting, CPA.
Dan Hogan
Director Advocacy, Partnerships and Community
After starting his career in the private sector,
Dan has spent the last 13 years working
within Victorian local government in various
management roles, beginning with the peak
representative body, the Municipal Association
of Victoria.
Dan brings a marketing sensibility to Council,
looking to solve community challenges
through improved community engagement,
advocacy and strategic partnerships.
Bachelor of Business, Marketing.
Organisation structure at 30 June 2021
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
31
02 Our people
I
Workforce profile
Workforce profile
As at 30 June 2021, Council employed 1186 people (812 full-time equivalent, or FTE), which is a decrease in FTE
staff from 2019-2020.
Overall workforce turnover increased to 14.17 per cent, a 2.15 percentage point decrease on 2019-2020. Headcount decreased in comparison to 2020, with FTE
figures decreasing by 26 overall. The average age of Council’s workforce is 46.96 years. Over 19.48 per cent of Council employees are in the 61-plus age group,
with these staff predominantly employed as school crossing supervisors and within Council’s Operations Centre.
.
Age groups
Age
group Female Male
Total
2020
< 21
6
11
17
21 - 25
46 32
78
26 - 30
46 32
78
31 - 35
64 36
100
36 - 40
84 64
148
41 - 45
69 63
132
46 - 50
79 55
134
51 - 55
86 71
157
56 - 60
68 43
111
≥ 61
106 125
231
Total
654 532
1,186
Brimbank total employment status
Status
2020-2021
Casual
202
Full-time
599
Part-time
385
Total
1,186
Employees by division and employment status
Division
Status
Female
Male
Total
CEO & Councillors
Full-time
2
0
2
Part-time
0
0
0
Casual
0
0
0
Advocacy Partnerships and Community
Engagement
Full-time
44
12
56
Part-time
25
1
26
Casual
1
0
1
Infrastructure & City Services
Full-time
27
239
266
Part-time
9
1
10
Casual
0
0
0
City Development
Full-time
43
41
84
Part-time
63
65
128
Casual
5
11
16
Community Wellbeing
Full-time
95
37
132
Part-time
179
37
216
Casual
119
64
183
Organisation Excellence
Full-time
35
24
59
Part-time
4
1
5
Casual
2
0
2
Brimbank Total
653
533
1,186
A summary of the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) Council staff by organisational structure, employment type and gender is set out below.
Division
Gender
Casual
Full-time
Part-time
Total
Advocacy, Partnerships & Community Engagement
Female
0
45
14
59
Male
0
11
1
12
CEO & Councillors
Female
0
2
0
2
Male
0
0
0
0
City Development
Female
1
42
19
62
Male
2
41
16
59
Community Wellbeing
Female
17
95
103
215
Male
9
37
20
66
Organisation Excellence
Female
0
35
3
38
Male
0
24
1
25
Infrastructure & City Services
Female
0
27
7
34
Male
0
239
1
240
Total
29
598
185
812
Note:
Casuals recorded as .14 of FTE. Council has 202 casuals that are contracted to five hours per week, which brings FTE for casuals down.
A summary of the number of FTE staff categorised by employment classification (band) and gender is set out below.
Employment classification (band)
Female FTE Male FTE
Total
Band 1
15
10
25
Band 2
21
100
121
Band 3
6
62
68
Band 4
62
18
80
Band 5
93
48
141
Band 6
87
43
130
Band 7
55
56
111
Band 8
27
32
59
Other
44
33
77
Total
410
402
812
Workforce profile (continued)
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
32
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Other staff matters
Gender equality and the prevention of
violence against women
Council implemented the Year 2 Implementation
Plan of Brimbank City Council’s Fairness,
Equality and Respect: Brimbank Strategy for
Gender Equality, Respectful Relationships and
Prevention of Family Violence 2019-2023. The
Strategy outlines a whole-of-council approach,
in partnership with community organisations
and the broader community, to create a
respectful, gender equitable and violence-free
organisation and municipality.
Key achievements include:
• For 16 Days of Activism, Council promoted
the Respect Victoria’s Active Bystander ‘Call
It Out’ Campaign, as well as developing a
Brimbank library campaign focused on gender
equality in books. Council also supported an
active bystander workshop for young people
in partnership with cohealth’s Agents for
Change Program and developed a series of
videos for staff on male allyship.
• In partnership with Football Victoria, Council
delivered two Go Football school holiday
programs to support soccer clubs to deliver
social soccer programs for women and girls.
Four local soccer clubs were involved and two
ongoing social soccer programs have been
launched since the program was delivered.
• Council launched the Empowering Moves
Program, a weekly boxing program for young
men aged 14-25. The program aimed to
facilitate recreational sessions and personal
development discussions on important issues
such as social expectations of masculinity,
positive choices and support services to
prevent violence in the community.
• Council participated in the Preventing Violence
Together in partnership with the International
Women’s Day film festival ‘Taking the Lead’.
The film festival involved partners in the
western region screening films online and in
person about women who took the lead and
chose to challenge gender inequity.
Learning and development
Employee development is a key focus for
Council, with a suite of programs offered across
the organisation to meet behavioural, technical
and compliance obligations as well as enhance
our employees’ knowledge, skills, experience
and competency.
Usually, development is delivered in both face
to-face and self-paced modes or via Brimbank’s
own e-learning tool bTrain. Modules are made
available to staff to learn at their own pace and
convenience. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic
lockdowns, 97 per cent of face-to-face training
was delivered via Zoom.
Modules on bTrain include COVID-19 Safety,
Cybersecurity Awareness, Family Violence,
Equal Opportunity, Fraud and Corruption
Awareness, Code of Conduct, Privacy and
Occupational Health & Safety.
A total of 167 training sessions were
coordinated in 2020-2021 with a total of 1,895
participants attending programs. In addition,
19 online training modules were completed by
4,548 staff members.
Learning programs offered took into
consideration departmental, interpersonal and
organisational needs to help employees meet
Council’s objectives.
Occupational health and safety (OHS)
In 2020-2021, we focused on implementing
Year One of the Health and Safety Strategy
whilst continuing to support the operational
needs of the organisation.
Our key achievements in 2020-2021
include:
• Implementation of a new health, safety and
wellbeing policy that is aligned with the
organisation’s values.
• Ongoing review of the Occupational Health
and Safety Management System, to ensure
it remained responsive to the needs of the
organisation and aligned with our compliance
obligations.
• Provision of health and safety support, as
services continued to adapt and respond to
the changing COVID-19 environment, e.g.
risk assessments, safe work procedures,
ergonomic assessments for staff working
from home etc.
• Implementation of an online JSA (Job Safety
Analysis) tool, to support our higher risk
services to identify and control hazards and
risks prior to commencing work.
• Completion of dangerous goods audits at
Keilor Operations Depot, Sunshine Operations
Depot, Keilor Golf Course and Sunshine
Leisure Centre.
• Expansion of the roll out of emergency
response procedures across a number of
our facilities and the completion of warden
training and emergency exercises.
• Launch of a hazardous manual handling
program, which aims to raise awareness
of and better control of hazardous manual
handling tasks which are performed across
the organisation.
• Development of a resource library, consisting
of safety conversation topics, safety alerts
and presentations, that supervisors and
managers can utilise to raise awareness of
health and safety in their work areas.
• Development and review of a number of safe
working procedures across the organisation.
Key performance indicators and workers’ compensation
Year
Lost time
injuries
WorkCover
claims
Days lost due to
workplace injury
2020-2021
18
24
957
2019-2020
19
14
779
2018-2019
12
18
713
2017-2018
8
13
574
2016-2017
13
14
1163
2015-2016
15
27
1443
2014-2015
21
34
986
2013-2014
24
37
973
2012-2013
18
30
1568
2011-2012
31
46
1346
2010-2011
21
34
1302
2009-2010
28
53
1481
2008-2009
25
36
1942
Days lost by division
City Development
38
Community Wellbeing
124
Infrastructure & City Services
795
Advocacy, Partnerships & Community Engagement
-
Organisational Excellence
-
Total days lost
957
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
33
03
Our
performance
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
Long-term
(10-20 years)
Medium-term
(4 years)
Short-term
(annual)
Outcome
measures:
Community
indicators
Impact
measures:
Key Performance
Indicators
Output
measures:
Annual Report
(Operations,
Financial &
Performance
Statements)
Community Vision 2040
Municipal Public Health & Wellbeing Plan
Long Term Financial Plan
Council Plan
Annual Action Plan
Annual Budget
Business Plans
An Inclusive
Community
A Liveable
Community
A Prosperous
Community
An Innovative
and Responsive
‘Community
First’ Council
Council Policies, Plans & Strategies
Municipal Strategic Statement, Sustainability Policy, Social Justice Charter
Reporting &
Measurement
34
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
35
The
Local Government Act 2020
requires
councils to prepare the following planning and
reporting documents:
• A Council Plan for a period of at least the next
four financial years by 31 October in the year
following a general election
• A Community Vison for at least the next 10
financial years, adopted by 31 October in the
year following a general election
• A Financial Plan for at least the next 10
financial years, adopted by 31 October in the
year following a general election
• A Budget for each financial year by 30 June
each year
• An Annual report in respect of each
financial year
Brimbank’s integrated planning
approach
Council has an integrated planning approach that
aligns our strategic, financial and operational
policies, plans and strategies with the
community’s aspirations. This ensures that all of
Council’s activity is generated towards putting the
community first, both now and into the future.
The integrated planning approach is based on
the vision and goals identified in the Brimbank
Council Plan 2017-2021 and how these will be
achieved according to the timeframe: short term
(annual), medium term (four years), and long
term (10-20 years).
The integrated planning approach provides a
basis for reporting and measuring Council activity
to demonstrate what has been achieved and
progress towards meeting the vision for Brimbank.
Brimbank Community Vision 2040
The Brimbank Community Vision 2040 (updated
2018) describes the community’s vision and
priorities for the next 20 years, centred around
three key themes: People, Place and Prosperity.
Planning and Accountability Framework
It establishes an ambitious and shared
framework for the community and partner
organisations to work towards.
These partners include:
• Community members
• Service providers
• Local organisations and groups
• State and federal government agencies
• Other Councils
The Community Vision will be reviewed in 2021
to ensure that it is continuously aligned with the
community’s aspirations.
Council Plan 2017-2021
The Council Plan is one of Brimbank’s primary
strategic documents. It is directly aligned to
the Community Vision and provides a four year
medium term outlook. The Council Plan informs the
development of Council’s Annual Plan and Budget.
The Council Plan 2017-2021 was adopted in August
2017, and sets out the agreed objectives, activities
and strategic indicators for Council to achieve its
strategic directions for: An Inclusive Community, A
Liveable Community, A Prosperous Community, and
An Innovative and Responsive ‘Community First’
Council.
It is the 2020-2021 performance that is reported in
this Annual Report.
Annual Budget and Financial Plan
The Financial Plan and Annual Budget document
the financial resources required to achieve the
goals and strategic objectives in the Council Plan
2017-2021. The Financial Plan 2021-2031 and
Annual Budget were adopted on 15 June 2021.
Municipal Strategic Statement
The Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS)
provides a strategic vision for Brimbank’s future
by setting out objectives for prospective land
use and development in Brimbank. It sets out
land use directions through policy themes,
objectives, strategies and guidelines, such as:
• Natural environment
• Built environment
• Housing
• Retailing and activity centres
• Industrial land use
• Transport and infrastructure
• Community and leisure facilities
Brimbank Sustainability Policy and
Framework
Brimbank Sustainability Policy and Framework
strategically addresses sustainability issues,
aiming to:
• Build a legacy enabling an engaged
and resilient community that supports
a sustainable environment containing
rich social, economic and environmental
characteristics
• Show that ‘Sustainability’ means our actions
meet current needs without compromising
the prospects of future generations
• Support our community in taking action
on the local impacts of resource depletion,
pollution and climate volatility
Brimbank Social Justice Charter
Council is committed to being a leader in the
area of social justice, and strives to create a
more just society where difference does not
lead to disadvantage.
Working in partnership with community,
service providers, business and other levels of
government, Council aims to build a municipality
where all residents, workers and visitors can
thrive socially and economically, regardless of
their personal circumstances or where they
were born.
The Brimbank Social Justice Charter was
updated in 2018 (after being first developed in
2008) and articulates Council’s commitment to
social justice and human rights.
It builds on the strengths and successes of the
previous Charter, while remaining relevant and
continuing to grow and shape a culture of social
justice and human rights in Brimbank.
Community engagement and consultation
Public participation in decisions that impact
people’s lives is critical to good governance
and community wellbeing. Council’s approach
to community engagement is guided by the
Community Engagement Policy 2021 which
articulates a commitment to genuine and best
practice community engagement to enable
meaningful and inclusive opportunities for the
community to be involved in and inform decision
making processes. Community engagement is
undertaken by Council to inform policy, planning
and delivery of services and infrastructure, and
advocating on behalf of the community.
03 Our performance
I
Planning and Accountability Framework
I
Council Plan Strategic Objectives
Council Plan Goals and Strategic Objectives
Council Plan
The Council Plan 2017-2021 identifies a
series of goals and strategic objectives that
describe what Council is aiming for in order
to achieve the vision for Brimbank.
Each strategic objective contains a number
of strategies that describe what Council
will do over the next four years in order to
achieve the goal.
Relevant Council policies and services are
identified in support of the goal, together
with indicators or measures of progress.
Goal
Strategic Objective
01
An Inclusive
Community
• Our community members are safe, healthy and well
• People have opportunities to participate in community life
• Services and facilities are fit-for-purpose and well-run
• Our community belongs and are proud of where they live
02
A Liveable
Community
• Public and open spaces are safe, clean and well-maintained
• People can get around easily on foot, by bike, car or public transport
• Our community lives sustainably
• The natural environment supports thriving biodiversity that is protected and well
connected
• The urban environment supports a growing population in designated areas while
respecting neighbourhood character and heritage where appropriate
03
A Prosperous
Community
• People are able to access quality education and lifelong learning opportunities
• People are able to find and maintain jobs that provide income security
• The local economy is strong and provides opportunities for the community to thrive
• Housing is of good quality, well located and affordable
• Brimbank is a leading destination for business, working, learning, recreation and living
04
An Innovative
and Responsive
‘Community First’
Council
• Council is fair, honest and transparent
• Council advocates and works in the interests of our community
• Council manages its assets and finances sustainably and responsibly
• Council staff are high performing and community-focused
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
36
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
37
Performance
Council’s performance for the 2020-2021 year has been reported against each goal to demonstrate
how Council is performing in achieving the Council Plan 2017-2021.
Performance has been measured as follows:
• Results achieved in relation to the strategic indicators in the Council Plan
• Progress in relation to the major initiatives identified in the Budget
• Results against the prescribed service performance indicators and measures
Our Goal –
An Inclusive
Community
• Our community are safe, healthy and well
• People have opportunities to participate in community life
• Services and facilities are fit-for-purpose and well-run
• Our community belongs and are proud of where they live
Strategic indicators
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Brimbank Council Plan.
Strategic indicator/measure
Result
2021 commentary
Resident perception of performance in providing
recreational facilities
71
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 6 points higher than
the score in 2020, the same score as the state average and 4 points
lower than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s performance in
providing art centres and libraries
72
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 3 points lower than the
score in 2020, 1 point lower than the state average and 1 point lower than
the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s performance in
delivering family support services
67
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 2 points higher than
the score in 2020, 1 point higher than the state average and the same
score as the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s performance in
delivering elderly support services
67
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 3 points higher than
the score in 2020, 2 points lower than the state average and 1 point
higher than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s performance in
delivering disadvantaged support services
65
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 6 points higher than
the score in 2020, 2 points higher than the state average and 1 point
higher than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s performance in
delivering community and cultural activities
67
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 1 point higher than
the score in 2020, 2 points higher than the state average and 1 point
higher than the Metro region.
Number of attendees at arts and cultural activities
395,030
Approximately 395,030 individuals attended a range of arts and
cultural activities that were delivered in Brimbank. This included online
and physical performances at Bowery Theatre, exhibitions, festivals,
events and cultural development activities.
Number of applications for Neighbour Day
activities and number of people that participated
0
Due to COVID–19 lockdowns and restrictions, Neighbour Day Grants
were not offered this year. There were social media posts encouraging
neighbours to check on each other and reconnect virtually.
The Neighbour Day Grants funding was allocated
to Brimbank Community Recovery Grants Stage 2
138
A total of 138 grants were allocated to various community groups and
support offered to address priorities connected to creating an inclusive
community.
Number of community grants supported (Healthy,
Equitable and Connected Communities)
45
During 2020-2021, Council implemented Community Recovery Grants
which included two categories: partner organisations and community
organisations. This was a departure from previous grant categories
included as indicators. A total of 14 grants were allocated to various
partner organisations to support the community as part of the
Brimbank COVID–19 Response and Recovery Strategy. A total of 31
grants were allocated to Community Organisations.
Major initiatives
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2020-2021 budget for the year.
Major initiatives
Progress – annual action plan
Create opportunities to support newly engaged
communities to engage in physical activity via the In2Sport
Program.
The In2Sport Program is a program to help children living in Brimbank take
part in community sport, regardless of financial circumstances. There was
a total of 278 of summer and winter applications for the in2sport Program.
148 were first time applicants and 49 were female.
Implement the ‘seedlings to schools’ urban farming program to support
Brimbank schools to grow, harvest, cook and eat healthy food; and to
recycle food waste.
The ‘Seedling to Schools’ Program, via Dame Phyllis Frost Women’s Centre,
was expanded to include two rounds of vegetable seedlings in autum and
spring.
Continue to facilitate the Brimbank Collective Action Committee to
lead and initiate Impact Brimbank aiming to close health and social
outcomes gaps for the Brimbank community over a ten year period.
Key actions include:
• Complete implementation and analysis of the Community
Conversation Tool
• Identification of the key focus area/s
• Program development
Community members analysed over 700 responses to the
community conversation survey. Two workshops were held
to examine results and refine the area of focus for program
development. Funding for the Impact Brimbank Program was
received from the Victorian Department of Jobs, Precincts and
Regions.
Facilitate the Growing Brimbank Collaboration to improve community
outcomes through service enhancements in the areas of early years,
nutrition and physical activity.
The Collaboration’s work included supporting Victoria University in
development of the Pathways in Place Program by drawing on the
expertise and established networks of Council’s youth teams, analysis
of data about use of St Albans Leisure Centre prior to closure to support
evaluation of the future Brimbank Aquatic and Wellness Centre, Impact
Brimbank and commencement of the World Gardens Program at Westvale.
Support the development of youth friendly spaces that support an
increase in the delivery of services for young people in Sunshine and West
Sunshine.
The Brimbank Youth Recreation Centre Co-design Study was endorsed
by Council in August. Recommendations from the report supported the
development of ‘pop-up’ initiatives in Sunshine. COVID-19 has delayed the
development and implementation of targeted youth programs in West
Sunshine and Sunshine. Information about youth programs has been
shared through Councillor portfolio briefings.
Commence building works that transition St Albans Leisure Centre into a
state of the art health and wellbeing hub.
The Australian Building Construction Company (ADCO) continue to
progress site works including the basement structure, 50 metre pool and
managing subcontractors to ensure resources are allocated to complete
critical path works. The project is currently on budget and on track for
completion mid-2022.
Continue to provide support for Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC Week to
celebrate our Aboriginal heritage and inform our broader community of
our Aboriginal history and the contributions made by our Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander residents.
Brimbank annual NAIDOC Week celebrations were held on 8–15 November
2020 and 29 May–4 June The theme was, ‘Always Was, Always Will Be’.
Council hosted a series of events and activities including:
• Flag raising
• Story of Who I am and Stories From the Heart
• Dance with Wilay
• Koori Homework Club
• Special First Nations Yarning Circle events
• Australian Ballet ‘Wilay-gu’
• Endangered Fauna Art at Home
• Posting positive messaging on social media
The planned Little Long Walk was cancelled due to COVID-19 lockdowns.
Facilitate youth mental health first aid programs to increase the capacity
of young people to recognise and support peers who may be developing a
mental health problem.
A total of 13 staff completed the online youth mental health first aid Zoom
training to increase capacity of young people to recognise and support
peers who may be developing a mental health problem.
Develop community impact analysis reports that detail the impact of
COVID-19 on individuals, families and communities in Brimbank to inform
Council’s community and service provider connections/engagement,
response, social policy and advocacy.
Two community impact analysis reports were completed. The reports
examine the impact of COVID-19 on individuals, families and communities
in Brimbank through each stage of the pandemic. They include a mix of
data and local observations to provide insights, not only on the impact but
also the community’s lived experience of COVID-19 in Brimbank.
Our Goal –
An Inclusive
Community
03 Our performance
I
Our Goal – An Inclusive Community
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
38
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
39
Services
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2020-2021 Budget and the persons or sections of the
community who are provided the service.
Service/Description
Net cost
actual budget
favourable/
(unfavourable) $’000
Community Planning and Advocacy
Community Planning & Advocacy
work towards enhancing community health and wellbeing. This includes Connected
Communities, Community & Council Planning, and Policy Advocacy & Research.
Connected Communities
facilitates Council’s community engagement, capacity building and social inclusion through establishing
governance and consultation structures, language services, Indigenous and cultural awareness programs, community leadership
programs such as the Community Governance Training Program and delivery of Council’s Annual Community Grant Program.
Community & Council Planning
ensures Council is delivering on its commitment to the community by developing, reporting and
monitoring the Community Vision and Council Plan.
Policy Advocacy & Research
addresses key issues in the community including social justice, safety, inclusion, disability support,
addiction problems, men’s violence against women and gender equity. This is achieved by developing policies, strategies, projects
and partnerships that improve health and wellbeing in the community, while undertaking important evaluation, research and data
analysis in order to meet requirements under the Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan.
2,656 2,904
248
Community Projects
Community Projects
build internal capacity through the implementation of service planning and project management frameworks,
and through the application of evidence that will improve service and project delivery across the Community Wellbeing Directorate,
resulting in better outcomes for the community.
314 491
177
Community Care
Community Care
provides a range of services that support older people, people living with a disability, children, families and youth.
Ageing & Inclusion
supports older people, and people with a disability, to maintain and enhance their physical, social and
emotional well-being by accessing in-home and community-based services provided by Council. Services such as in-home care
services, social support and planned activity groups, delivered meals, community transport and home maintenance to help residents
live a fulfilling and independent life.
Families & Early Years
provides a range of services for children and families in the community including Maternal and Child Health
Services, community and supported playgroups and kindergarten registration. Maternal and Child Health services are available
at eight locations, providing health and wellbeing information for parents and children aged 0-5 years, and intensive support for
vulnerable families experiencing parenting difficulties.
Youth Services
offers a number of services to guide young people through their personal development and encourages them to
participate positively in community life through support, counselling and youth programs that strengthen and build resilience in
young people and builds partnerships with other local services to support young people.
8,845 17,724
8,879
Performance (continued)
03 Performance
I
Our Goal: An Inclusive Community
Service/Description
Net cost
actual budget
favourable/
(unfavourable) $’000
Leisure and Community Facilities
Leisure and Community Facilities
is comprised of Sports and Recreation, Community Facilities, Leisure and Community Facilities
Planning and Major Leisure Facilities including the Sunshine and St Albans Leisure Centres, the Keilor Basketball and Netball Stadium
and Keilor Public Golf Course.
Sports and Recreation
develops and delivers sport and recreation projects, programs and events to meet the diverse needs
of the community. This includes the allocation of 49 sports pavilions, 79 playing fields, pitches, diamonds, bocce pitches and
greens, 7 indoor courts and 64 outdoor tennis courts. The team supports clubs in capacity building, business planning and funding
applications, and takes regular bookings for the Keilor Park Synthetic Sports Fields and Synthetic Athletics Track.
Community Facilities
manages regular, casual and function bookings at Council’s 35 halls and meeting rooms. In addition they
support, guide and develop community groups such as Senior Citizens, Scouts and Girl Guides by managing venue tenancy
agreements.
Major Leisure Facilities.
The four major leisure facilities in Brimbank are the Keilor Basketball and Netball Stadium, the St Albans
Leisure Centre, the Sunshine Leisure Centre and the Keilor Public Golf Course. These centres provide a diverse and affordable range
of health, fitness and community activities and programs that offer the community opportunities to participate in physical activity
and a safe place for social interaction.
Leisure and Community Facilities Planning
undertake strategic work to determine the leisure and facility related needs of the
Brimbank community and the most appropriate way for Council to meet these needs now and in the future. This work informs
Council’s Capital Works Program and determines the priorities for funding based on evidence and demand.
3,944 4,444
500
Facilities and Major Projects
Facilities and Major Projects
is responsible for the delivery of Council’s Facilities Asset Management Plan and Major Projects
including the ongoing maintenance of Council’s facilities and buildings.
11,969 11,840
(129)
Building Services and Environmental Health
Building Services and Environmental Health
implements legislation through education, advice and enforcement to ensure a safe
and high standard of public health is maintained across the city. This includes enforcing the
Building Act 1993
,
Building Regulations
2018, Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008, Public Health & Wellbeing Regulation 2019, Food Act 1984
, and
Tobacco Act &
Environment Protection Act
. It also issues and inspects building permits and manages customer requests to ensure the safety of the
built environment and health of the community within Brimbank.
979 1,156
177
City Compliance
City Compliance
enforces local laws, which are important for residents and businesses to enjoy a safe, clean, well-functioning
living and working environment. Council provides community information and education around parking controls, fire mitigation,
litter control, event approvals, animal management and school crossing supervision. It will also prosecute individuals or businesses
where necessary.
2,744 3,415
671
Our Goal –
An Inclusive
Community
Our Goal –
An Inclusive
Community
(continued)
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
40
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
41
Service performance indicators
The following statement provides the result of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation of material
variations.
Service
indicator
2018 result
2019 result
2020 result
2021 result 2021 commentary
Cost of indoor
aquatic facilities
$3.55
$3.32
$9.49
$10.11
Brimbank City Council continues to place a high emphasis on
delivering services in a cost efficient manner. Both the closure
of the St Albans Leisure Centre (due to the planned upgrade to
the Brimbank Aquatic and Wellness Centre) and adherence to
COVID-19 restrictions resulting in facility closures has continued
to negatively impact the number of visits and, hence, income.
Despite these factors this result remains within the range
expected by Council. Find out more about our leisure centres at
www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/leisure-parks-and-facilities
Utilisation of
aquatic facilities
2.85
2.83
1.98
0.81
Brimbank City Council saw just over 170,000 visits to the
Sunshine Leisure Centre throughout the 2020-2021 financial
year. The decrease in visits when compared to previous years is
attributed to closure of the St Albans Leisure Centre on 18 March
2020 to commence construction of the new Brimbank Aquatic
and Wellness Centre. COVID-19 restrictions saw the closure of
Sunshine Leisure Centre throughout the reporting period, further
impacting utilisation of facilities. Find out more about our leisure
centres at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/leisure-parks-and-facilities
Time taken to
action food
complaints
1.36
1.13
1.14
1.15
Brimbank City Council places a strong emphasis on food safety
and public health. Reports of food complaints and related
requests continue to be promptly responded to with the majority
of complaints investigated on the day of receipt or the following
day to ensure a high level of food safety monitoring and customer
satisfaction. This result remains within the range expected by
Council. Find out more about food safety at www.brimbank.vic.
gov.au/business/types-businesses/food-premises-and-safety
Food safety
assessments
100%
101.07% 100.45%
101.19%
Brimbank City Council seeks to deliver an effective and cost
efficient food safety service for our community. Throughout
the 2020-2021 reporting period some premises received an
additional assessment as a means to assist new proprietors
with the sale of safe food. This result remains within the range
expected by Council. Find out more about food safety at www.
brimbank.vic.gov.au/business/types-businesses/food-premises
and-safety
Cost of food
safety service
$239.12 $253.93 $241.26
$260.90
Brimbank City Council seeks to deliver an effective and cost
efficient food safety service for our community. The 2020-2021
cost of service result has seen a slight increase of 8% due to the
impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic including fixed, temporary
and mobile premises closing due to COVID-19 (Stay at Home)
directions. Despite these challenges this result continues to
exceed the range expected by Council. Find out more about food
safety at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/business/types-businesses/
food-premises-and-safety
Critical and major
non-compliance
outcome
notifications
100%
100%
100%
100.00%
Brimbank City Council seeks to deliver an effective and cost
efficient food safety service for our community. This result
demonstrates the urgency with which all critical and major non
compliance notifications were followed up throughout 2020-
2021 reporting period. In addition to this, extra follow ups are
conducted prior to renewal of registration to ensure the premises
is meeting compliance. This result exceeds the range expected
by Council. Find out more about food safety at www.brimbank.vic.
gov.au/business/types-businesses/food-premises-and-safety
Performance (continued)
03 Performance
I
Our Goal: An Inclusive Community
Service
indicator
2018 result
2019 result
2020 result
2021 result 2021 commentary
Library collection
usage
5.84
5.48
3.90
3.75
The Brimbank City Council library collection continues to be well
utilised with community members accessing both printed and
digital materials at our five library branches and through the home
library service. Due to COVID-19, our libraries were closed for
much of the year and alternative service models were introduced
including, ‘Libraries at Your Door’ and Click and Collect services.
Council saw a slight decrease in comparison to the previous year,
however a 51% overall increase in borrowing of e-resources was
noted throughout the 2020-2021 financial year. Find out more
about Brimbank libraries at www.brimbanklibraries.vic.gov.au
Standard of
library collection
58.63% 64.38% 67.66%
78.54
Brimbank City Council's library collection continues to be
reflective of community needs and demands with over
78% of the collection under five years of age. This 16%
improvement when compared to the 2019-2020 result is
attributed to updated purchasing and maintenance systems
that saw 100% of customer requests for library collection
items purchased. This improved result remains in the range
expected by Council. Find out more about Brimbank libraries
at www.brimbanklibraries.vic.gov.au
Cost of library
service per
population
$35.69
$36.00
$34.36
$33.38
Brimbank City Council has continued to work towards ensuring the
cost of the library service remains stable whilst modifying service
delivery to ensure residents could safely access Brimbank’s library
collections throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Examples of the
ways in which the library service continued within COVID-19 (Stay
at Home) restrictions included the non-contact home delivery
service, ‘Libraries at Your Door’ and Click and Collect services. This
result sees a 2.45% cost reduction compared to 2019-2020 and
remains within the result set by Council. Find out more about
Brimbank libraries at www.brimbanklibraries.vic.gov.au
Active library
members
12.55%
12.01%
20.27%
11.97%
Brimbank City Council continues to see a steady demand for
library services irrespective of the ongoing challenges the library
service is confronted with throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.
Despite service closures, residents have continued to access
the library collection via alternative service models including,
‘Libraries at Your Door’ and Click and Collect. A technical error was
identified from the 2019-2020 reporting and auditing period that
overstated the number of active library borrowers. The actual
result for this period was 12.09% highlighting a consistent result
over the past three years that remains in the range expected
by Council. Find out more about Brimbank libraries at www.
brimbanklibraries.vic.gov.au
Participation in
first maternal
and child health
(MCH) home visit
107.31% 99.55% 97.27%
98.04%
Brimbank City Council is pleased to record an attendance rate
of 98% of infants at the 4-week Key Age and Stage Visit
in the 2020-2021 financial year. This result sees a marginal
increase when compared to the 2019-2020 financial year and
remains in the range set by Council. Find out more about the
MCH Service at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/health-family-and
support/maternal-and-child-health
Infant enrolments
in the MCH
Service
100%
100%
101.42%
101.21%
Brimbank City Council has continued to achieve more than
100% infant enrolments in the MCH Service, highlighting
100% engagement over a five year period. This result
continues to remain in the range set by Council. More
information about the MCH Service can be found at www.
brimbank.vic.gov.au/health-family-and-support/maternal
and-child-health
Our Goal –
An Inclusive
Community
Our Goal –
An Inclusive
Community
(continued)
(continued)
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
image
42
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
43
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
Our Goal –
A Liveable
Community
• Public and open spaces are safe, clean and well-maintained
• People can get around easily on foot, by bike, car or public transport
• Our community lives sustainably
• The natural environment supports thriving biodiversity that is protected and well
connected
• The urban environment supports a growing population in designated areas while
respecting neighbourhood character and heritage where appropriate
Strategic indicators
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation
to the strategic indicators included in the Council Plan.
Strategic indicator/measure
Result 2021 commentary
Resident perception of Council’s
performance in enforcement of local
laws
65
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 6 points higher than the score in 2020,
1 point higher than the state average and 1 point lower than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s
performance in managing the
appearance of public areas
67
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 3 points higher than the score in 2020,
6 points lower than the state average and 7 points lower than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s
performance in managing the condition
of local streets and footpaths
63
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 5 points higher than the score in 2020,
4 points higher than the state average and 2 points lower than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s
performance in managing the condition
of sealed local roads
64
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 4 points higher than the score in 2020,
7 points higher than the state average and 4 points lower than the Metro region.
Resident perception of importance
and Council’s performance in traffic
management
63
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 4 points higher than the score in
2020, 4 points higher than the state average and 4 points higher than the Metro region.
Resident perception of importance
and Council’s performance in providing
parking facilities
59
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 3 points higher than the score in
2020, 1 point higher than the state average and 1 point higher than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s
performance in waste management
69
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 3 points higher than the score in 2020,
the same score as the state average and 3 points lower than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s
performance in general town
planning policy
60
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 1 point lower than the score in 2020, 5
points higher than the state average and 4 points higher than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s
performance in planning and
building permits
59
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 1 point lower than the score in 2020, 8
points higher than the state average and 5 points higher than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s
performance in planning for
population growth
60
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 5 points higher than the score in 2020,
7 points higher than the state average and 7 points higher than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s
performance in environmental
sustainability
63
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 2 points higher than the score in 2020,
1 point higher than the state average and 1 point lower than the Metro region.
Reduction in greenhouse gas
emissions from Council operations
13,247 T
CO2-e
Greenhouse gas emissions from Council operations have been reduced by 50% since 2011.
Reduction in Council’s potable water use,
increase in alternative water use and
improvement in water quality entering
waterways in Brimbank.
Potable Water
Consumption
175.19 ML
Alternative
water use: 59.7
Potable water consumption decreased by 42% compared to the 2019-2020 result. This was
primarily a result of reduction in demand as a result of COVID-19 related restrictions, aided by
above average rainfall.
Alternative water use (stormwater harvesting) decreased by 17% compared to the 2019-
2020 result due to natural variability in rainfall patterns.
Number of community grants supported
(Our Community Living Sustainably)
45
During 2020-2021, Council implemented Community Recovery Grants which included
two categories: partner organisations and community organisations. This was a
departure from previous grant categories included as indicators. A total of 14 grants
were allocated to various partner organisations to support the community as part of
the Brimbank COVID–19 Response and Recovery Strategy. A total of 31 grants were
allocated to Community Organisations.
Performance (continued)
Service
indicator
2018 result
2019 result
2020 result
2021 result 2021 commentary
Cost of the MCH
Service
$80.53
$81.10
$82.24
$74.04
Brimbank City Council places a high emphasis on delivering
services in a cost efficient manner. The 2020-2021 cost
of service result has seen a decrease of 10% highlighting
Council’s continued commitment to delivering the MCH
Service within the expected budget and requirements. This
improved result remains within range set by Council. Find
out more about the MCH Service at www.brimbank.vic.gov.
au/health-family-and-support/maternal-and-child-health
Participation in
the MCH Service
71.5%
70.49% 68.92%
63.05%
Brimbank City Council is committed to the delivery of well
targeted MCH services. Our overall participation rate reduced
over 2020-2021 due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.
These service adjustments included the need to prioritise
newborn babies and Aboriginal children, increasing the length
of appointment times to allow for infection control and providing
additional support for families during this stressful time. Clients
were provided with an initial tele-health appointment and follow
up physical assessments. Due to this prioritisation, routine
appointment times were limited for older children. However,
children and families with additional or complex needs were
able to access the service when required. The result remains in
the range expected by Council. Find out more about the MCH
Service at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/health-family-and-support/
maternal-and-child-health
Participation in
the MCH Service
by Aboriginal
children
62.11%
55.26% 70.00%
71.72%
Brimbank City Council continues to embed continuous
improvement initiatives to engage indigenous families registered
in the MCH Service, including targeted engagement strategies.
Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic Aboriginal children were
prioritised, resulting in 71 of the 99 registered Aboriginal children
participating in the service over the 2020-2021 financial year.
This result is in the range expected by Council. Find out more
about the MCH Service at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/health
family-and-support/maternal-and-child-health
03 Performance
I
Our Goal: An Inclusive Community | Our Goal: A Liveable Community
Performance (continued)
Our Goal –
An Inclusive
Community
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
image
44
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
45
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
03 Performance
I
Our Goal: A Liveable Community
Major initiatives
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2020-2021 Budget for the year.
Major initiatives
Progress
Install feature lighting and a welcoming and inviting entrance to Sunshine
as determined by the ‘Gateway to Sunshine’ Project funded by the Victorian
Department of Justice and Community Safety’s Public Infrastructure Fund.
Lights have been installed at the ‘Gateway to Sunshine’ on Ballarat
Road/Hampshire Road as part of the MB Lynch Memorial Gardens
upgrade.
Continue to deliver the ‘Light Up’ Program in the Sunshine and St Albans
Activity Centres through a range of initiatives including lighting projections,
decorative and artistic lighting and evening activation.
Council has prepared an Activation Toolkit that identifies initiatives that
can promote visitation to Brimbank activity centres and stimulate the
local economy.
The ‘Enjoy Local’ Activation Program (Enjoy Local) was developed in
consultation with business representatives, including the Sunshine
and St Albans Business Association. Incorporating the Sunshine and St
Albans Light Up Program, Enjoy Local programmed 61 events including
musical performances, kid’s activities and entertainment across
Brimbank activity centres.
Create an attractive, integrated, accessible open space network via the
implementation of the Creating Better Parks – Open Space and Playground
Policy and Plan, including upgrades at the following parks:
Suburban Park upgrades at:
• Balmoral Park (Derrimut)
• Evergreen Avenue Reserve (Albanvale)
Neighbourhood Park upgrades at:
• Robinson Court Reserve (Delahey)
• Waterfield Reserve (Cairnlea)
• Highcombe Reserve (St Albans)
All new and upgraded parks funded through the 2020-2021 Capital
Works Program are complete.
Develop a master plan for Alfrieda Street, St Albans as a key destination for
gathering, shopping and socialising in a vibrant space.
Initial community and stakeholder consultation has been completed.
Development of a master plan will continue into 2021-2022 as
scheduled.
Develop a Creating Better Streets Strategy that aims to achieve more liveable,
resilient and sustainable streets by:
• Increasing canopy cover
• Using stormwater to create greener, cooler streets
• Supporting walking and cycling
• Creating a positive sense of place for the community
The Creating Better Streets Background Analysis Report is complete.
Consultation and the Strategy will be finalised in 2021-2022.
Seek to reduce contamination of recycling and green waste below target
levels.
Undertook targeted contamination reduction campaigns, including:
• Social media campaigns aimed at improving kerbside recycling habits
• Promoted ‘Back to Earth’ initiative aimed at reducing contamination
in the green waste recycling stream
• Promoted ‘Recycling Right’ community engagement and behaviour
change campaign
• Waste collection drivers notifying residents through sticker notices
placed on bins with bin not being collected until contamination
removed
Contamination currently: Recycling – 14.3% and Green Waste – 3.1%
Our Goal –
A Liveable
Community
Major initiatives
Progress
Implement Year One actions in the Brimbank Climate Emergency Plan (subject
to Council approval) including:
• Submit the Plan as a pledge under the
Victorian Climate Change Act
• Undertake an analysis of municipal emissions and optimal pathway to
‘decarbonise’ Brimbank to net zero emissions
• Advocate the Victorian Government to declare a climate emergency, put a
price on carbon pollution and target 100% renewable energy for Victoria
for 2030
The Year One actions in the Brimbank Climate Emergency Plan have
been completed, or are well progressed including:
• Submitting the Plan as a pledge under the
Victorian Climate Change
Act
• Undertaking an analysis of municipal emissions and an optimal
pathway to ‘decarbonise’ Brimbank to net zero emissions (for
industrial and commercial emissions)
• Advocating the Victorian Government to declare a climate
emergency, put a price on carbon pollution and target 100%
renewable energy for Victoria for 2030
Continue to conduct street tree planting programs to increase Brimbank’s tree
canopy coverage as per the Urban Forest Strategy (2016–2046).
Street tree planting for 2020 was completed with around 3,680 trees
planted.
Planting for the 2021 tree planting season is ongoing and may extend
into September/October subject to extra funding received from the
State Government’s 500,000 tree planting initiative.
Complete Stage Three of the Hampshire Road Masterplan to create a green
active hub.
Hampshire Road Civic Green (Stage 3) was completed and the official
opening occurred on Friday 22 May 2021.
Implement aspects of the Sydenham Park Master Plan, including:
• Flora and Fauna Assessment Report
• Cultural Heritage Management Plan
• Sydenham Park Conservation Community Tours
• Sydenham Park Restoration Management Plan
• Robertson’s Homestead Site Feasibility Study
• Schematic design for entry landscape, walking trails, shared paths, fencing
and pedestrian destination points
• Existing gravel path upgrades to make suitable for walking and cycling
The implementation of the Sydenham Park Master Plan 2020
continued in 2020-2021 with the following investigation studies:
• Final Flora and Fauna Assessment Report is received
• Cultural Heritage Management Plan is complete and submitted to
Aboriginal Victoria for approval
• Three community tours have been conducted with one cancelled
due to COVID-19 restrictions
• Draft Restoration Management Plan received and in review
• Robertson’s Homestead Feasibility is complete
• Schematic designs are being finalised and then prepared for tender
later in 2021
• Existing gravel path upgrades have been deferred pending required
approvals
Performance (continued)
Our Goal –
A Liveable
Community
Performance (continued)
(continued)
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
46
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
47
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
Services
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2020-2021 Budget and the persons or sections of the
community who are provided the service.
Service/Description
Net cost
actual budget
favourable/
(unfavourable) $’000
Engineering Services
Engineering Services
ensures that Brimbank is a safe, liveable and attractive place to live and work. This is achieved through
planning, design, construction, maintenance and renewal/disposal of local roads, drainage systems and other vital infrastructure.
It coordinates the preparation of Council’s 10 year Capital Works Program and manages and reviews the annual Capital Works
Program reporting.
4,657 5,269
612
Environment
Environment
engages with Council and the community to work towards an environmentally sustainable city through the efficient
use of limited resources and through innovative design. We also engage with and encourage the community to value Brimbank’s
outstanding and unique natural areas.
This aim is achieved by providing leadership and education while providing direction and coordination in resource efficiency
measures including integrated water management, climate change mitigation and adaptation, waste minimisation and education,
community engagement in the conservation, management and restoration of Brimbank’ s natural areas including grasslands,
waterways and rocky escarpments and managing contaminated land.
4,272 7,829
3,557
Asset and Property Services
Asset and Property Services
is responsible for developing, implementing and coordinating an enterprise system of policies,
strategies, plans, tools, information, analytics, procedures and operational practices to ensure that all infrastructure assets are
maintained, controlled and monitored across their entire life cycle. This is carried out in accordance with laws and regulations, and
pursuant to the National Asset Management Framework (NAMAF).
239 397
158
Urban Design
Urban Design
provides a landscape, architectural and urban design service delivering public realm projects that create attractive,
safe, connected and sustainable urban places which support community wellbeing, social connectedness and foster civic pride.
Project delivery includes park upgrades, streetscape upgrades, tree planting and shared user paths in addition to advocating for
good urban design outcomes for all major infrastructure projects and private developments.
3,380 3,276
(104)
Operations Group
The
Operations Group
is responsible for the collection and disposal of residential waste and recycling, maintaining the local
road network and town centres/urban villages, parks & streetscapes and Council’s plant & equipment, pedestrian facilities and
coordination of Council’s emergency management arrangements.
The
Operations Group
consists of the following Service Units: Fleet, Parks, Roads and Cleansing, Waste, Pedestrian Facility and
provides oversight of Council’s Emergency Management responsibilities.
Truck, plant and vehicle fleets are purchased responsibly and maintained through
Fleet Services
, which ensures they are compliant
with all legislative requirements.
Parks, sportsgrounds and the outdoor spaces surrounding Council-owned facilities are maintained by
Parks Services
.
Roads and drainage systems are managed by
Roads and Cleansing Services
in accordance with Council’s Road Management Plan,
and are responsible for the overall cleanliness of Council land.
Waste Services
organises the community’s weekly kerbside waste collection and fortnightly recycling and green waste collections.
It also manages Council’s Resource Recovery Centre and delivers the At Call Hard Waste Collection Service to residents.
Pedestrian Facilities Services
program and implement Council’s annual footpath and concrete works rehabilitation program in
accordance with Council’s Road Management Plan.
Emergency Management
coordinates the use of Council resources for emergency response and recovery in accordance with the
Emergency Management Act 1986 & 2013
, including coordination of a Municipal Emergency Management Planning Committee and
development and maintenance of the Municipal Emergency Management Plan.
42,168 42,536
(368)
City Planning and Planning Compliance
City Planning
is responsible for administering the Brimbank Planning Scheme by providing advice and making determinations on
planning permit applications for land use, development and subdivisions, and responding to property information and demolition
requests. City Planning provides planning services to Council, the community and the development industry. This also includes
representing Council at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal on planning matters.
Planning Compliance
is responsible for enforcing planning regulations and permit conditions and responding to customer requests
relating to planning matters.
(1,944) (983)
961
Our Goal –
A Liveable
Community
Service performance indicators
The following statement provides the result of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation of material variations.
Service
indicator
2018 result
2019 result
2020 result
2021 result 2021 commentary
Time taken to
action animal
management
requests
1.57
1.32
0.88 days
1.39 days
Brimbank City Council places a strong emphasis on responsible pet
ownership and community safety by responding to the majority
of animal requests within 1.5 days from when the request
is received. The Animal Management Service was presented
with challenges relating to the COVID-19 pandemic including
officers unable to carry out the same level of tasks due to State
Government directives detailing essential worker tasks as strictly
limited to risk to safety or emergency. This result continues to
demonstrate Councils responsiveness to animal management
requests and remains within the range expected by Council. Find
out more about animal management at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/
pets-and-animals
Animals
reclaimed
22.64%
22.11%
64.10%
33.61%
Brimbank City Council places a strong emphasis on responsible
pet ownership and community safety, with a primary objective of
the Brimbank Domestic Animal Plan to reduce euthanasia rate of
domestic pets. The Animal Management Service saw a significant
reduction in animals reclaimed due to the impacts of the COVID-19
pandemic. This shift was attributed to State Government (Stay at
Home) directions that saw residents unable to collect animals, as
well as the added financial impact of costs associated with animal
collection. Whilst this significant reduction of numbers of animals
reclaimed by owners occurred, the increase in animals rehomed
rose sharply seeing many of these animals adopted. The rise in pet
adoption occurred throughout the COVID-19 pandemic due to the
health and wellbeing benefits associated with pet ownership. Council
will continue to closely monitor these figures in coming years. Find
out more about animal management at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/
pets-and-animals
Cost of animal
management
service per
population
$7.88
$8.36
$6.99
$7.88
Brimbank City Council places a high emphasis on delivering services in a
cost efficient manner. The 2020-2021 cost of service result has seen a
slight increase of 12.7% due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic
including price rises by suppliers and changes to work procedures
due to State Government (Stay at Home) restrictions. Despite these
challenges this result continues to remain in the range set by Council.
Find out more about animal management at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/
pets-and-animals
Animal
management
prosecutions
5.00
24.00
8.00
3.00
Brimbank City Council investigates all infringements under the
Domestic Animals Act 1994
and where supportive evidence is
available actively prosecutes these matters. The achieved result
of 100% is within expected range set by Council. Find out more
about Animal Management at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/pets
and-animals
Sealed local road
requests
68.89
51.70
60.84
58.56
Brimbank City Council continues to respond to all resident
requests for sealed local roads within the approved requirements
of the Road Management Plan. Council’s commitment to
investment in the road network over previous years has resulted
in a consistent result in the 2020-2021 financial year due to the
road network being maintained to a high standard. This result
remains within the range expected by Council.
Sealed local
roads maintained
to condition
standards
84.87% 87.75% 89.22%
91.49%
Brimbank City Council has continued to fund the renewal of its
road network to ensure the overall condition of the network does
not deteriorate. This result remains within the range expected by
Council.
Performance (continued)
03 Performance
I
Our Goal: An Inclusive Community
Performance (continued)
(continued)
Our Goal –
A Liveable
Community
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
image
48
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
49
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
Service
indicator
2018 result
2019 result
2020 result
2021 result 2021 commentary
Cost of sealed
local road
reconstruction
$83.70
$100.17
$92.80
$106.32
Brimbank City Council undertakes all road reconstruction via
contracts, which are awarded following a competitive public tender
process. This variation in result is due to a higher proportion of
road area being entirely reconstructed with full depth pavement
treatment as well as following environmentally friendly water
sensitive design. The result remains in the range set by Council.
Cost of sealed
local road
resealing
$27.40
$25.31 $19.80
$25.16
Brimbank City Council undertakes all road resealing works via
contracts, which are awarded following a competitive public
tender process. The cost is indicative of continued competitive
market conditions in the road construction industry and continues
to remain within the range set by Council.
Kerbside bin
collection
requests
169.66
129.24 135.88
135.16
Brimbank City Council continues to endeavour to deliver an effective,
cost efficient bin collection service for the community. The bin
collection service includes replacement of damaged bins, repair
of broken bins and the collection and disposal of missed bins from
residential properties within the municipality. This result continues to
be in the range set by Council. Find out more about waste services at
www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/rubbish-recycling-and-waste
Kerbside
collection bins
missed
10.64
10.53 11.50
11.07
Brimbank City Council continues to endeavour to deliver an
effective, cost efficient bin collection service for the community and
has seen a minimal decrease in the numbers of kerbside collection
bins missed. This result continues to be in the range set by Council.
Find out more about waste services at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/
rubbish-recycling-and-waste
Cost of kerbside
garbage bin
collection service
$115.25
$112.34 $115.75
$111.46
Brimbank City Council endeavours to deliver an effective, cost
efficient kerbside garbage collection service for our community
with this result continuing to remain within the range expected
by Council. Find out more about waste services at www.brimbank.
vic.gov.au/rubbish-recycling-and-waste
Cost of kerbside
recyclables
collection service
$23.98
$42.36
$49.50
$43.43
Brimbank City Council endeavours to deliver an effective, cost
efficient kerbside recyclables collection service for our community.
Brimbank entered into a medium term recycling services
agreement with external provider Cleanaway until 1 July 2021.
Brimbank executed the extension option for the Cleanaway
contract until 30 June 2022 and is working on a collective
procurement process with other metropolitan councils to secure
a long term recycling processing contract that is anticipated to
further reduce processing costs. A decrease in the cost of the
kerbside recyclables collection is evident when compared to the
previous year. This improved result remains in the range set by
Council. Find out more about waste services at www.brimbank.vic.
gov.au/rubbish-recycling-and-waste
Kerbside
collection waste
diverted from
landfill
39.27% 38.01% 41.41%
40.60%
Brimbank City Council endeavours to deliver an effective, cost
efficient kerbside recyclables collection service for our community,
with Council’s waste diversion rate from landfill decreasing slightly
when compared to 2019-2020. This result remains in the range
expected by Council. Find out more about waste services at www.
brimbank.vic.gov.au/rubbish-recycling-and-waste
Our Goal –
A Liveable
Community
Performance (continued)
Performance (continued)
Service performance indicators (continued)
Service
indicator
2018 result
2019 result
2020 result
2021 result 2021 commentary
Time taken to
decide planning
applications
123.00
120.00
126.00
91.50
Brimbank City Council places strong emphasis on working with
applicants and objectors to achieve good outcomes in planning
determinations. Council continues to balance time taken to
negotiate land use and development issues with the need to
ensure efficient processing of applications. The 2020-2021
result saw a 27% improvement in processing times, achieving a
significant reduction of 34.5 days when compared to processing
times in 2019-2020. Find out more about Brimbank’s statutory
planning service at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/building-and
planning/planning
Planning
applications
decided within
60 days
52.82% 61.77%
64.97%
70.55%
Brimbank City Council places an emphasis on working with
applicants and objectors to achieve good outcomes in planning
determinations, so additional time may be taken in negotiating
land use and development issues. An 8.59% increase in
performance can be seen in the 2020-2021 financial year against
this indicator when compared to 2019-2020. The result falls
within the range set by Council. Find out more about Brimbank's
statutory planning service at www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/building
and-planning
Cost of statutory
planning service
$3,072.92 $2808.12 $2882.36
$2,642.31
Brimbank City Council has a strong commitment to providing
an efficient and cost effective statutory planning service. This
result has seen costs of planning applications decrease by 8.33%
when compared to the 2019/20 reporting period. This improved
result continues to remain within the range set by Council. Find
out more about Brimbank’s statutory planning service at www.
brimbank.vic.gov.au/building-and-planning/planning
Council planning
decisions upheld
at VCAT
66.67% 52.63% 55.56%
60.87%
The number of decisions on applications upheld at VCAT remains
in favour of Brimbank City Council, highlighting the work that
Council does to support decisions in the best interest of the
community. This result remains in the range expected by Council.
Find out more about Brimbank’s statutory planning service at
www.brimbank.vic.gov.au/building-and-planning/planning
Expenses per
head of municipal
population
$918.98 $920.43 $970.77
986.30
The result is within the range expected by Council.
Infrastructure per
head of municipal
population
$7,411.23 $7,714.16 $7,823.67
8,071.55
The result is within the range expected by Council.
Own-source
revenue per head
of municipal
population
$835.02 $879.81 $864.74
863.39
The result is within the range expected by Council.
Recurrent
grants per head
of municipal
population
$138.53 $132.07 $121.18
124.30
The result is within the range expected by Council.
(continued)
03 Performance
I
Our Goal: An Inclusive Community
Our Goal –
A Liveable
Community
image
50
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
51
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
03 Performance
I
Our Goal: A Prosperous Community
Our Goal –
A Prosperous
Community
• People are able to access quality education and lifelong learning opportunities
• People are able to find and maintain jobs that provide income security
• The local economy is strong and provides opportunities for the community to thrive
• Housing is of good quality, well located and affordable
• Brimbank is a leading destination for business, working, learning, recreation and living
Strategic indicators
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Strategic indicator/measure
Result
2021 commentary
Number of attendees at libraries and
neighbourhood houses to access services,
programs and activities
1,003,468
In 2020-2021 there were 260,429 physical visits to Brimbank’s five
libraries, 552,900 visits to the Online Library and 7,694 Library to Your
Door visits. There were also 9,503 attendees at physical programs and
122,980 attendees/ views on online programs across the Libraries Unit.
This equates to a total of 953,506 attendees across libraries.
Resident perception of Council’s performance
in providing art centres and libraries
72
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 3 points lower than
the score in 2020, 1 point lower than the state average and 1 point
lower than the Metro region.
Number of community grants supported
(Lifelong Learning, Destination Brimbank)
45
During 2020-2021, Council implemented Community Recovery Grants
which included two categories: partner organisations and community
organisations. This was a departure from previous grant categories
included as indicators. A total of 14 grants were allocated to various
partner organisations to support the community as part of the
Brimbank COVID–19 Response and Recovery Strategy. A total of 31
grants were allocated to Community Organisations.
Major Initiatives
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2020-2021 Budget for the year.
Major initiatives
Progress
Promote reading, literacy and positive social connections
through the Little Libraries Community Book Exchange
with three structures located throughout the municipality.
Initial designs have been submitted and a draft community consultation strategy has been
completed. The process for managing the street libraries has been developed.
Continue to support and promote the operation of
iHarvest Co-working Sunshine to provide a vibrant
and affordable co-working location for start-ups,
entrepreneurs, freelancers and business.
iHarvest continued to operate under COVID-19 restrictions with closures throughout
a large period of the financial year. Council continues to promote its online business
development program to all members.
Establish an Experience Brimbank tourism website to
promote visitation to Brimbank and its destinations.
Planning and design of a new Brimbank tourism website was completed, with preparations
for a launch currently underway.
Review and develop strategic plans and planning policies
to facilitate appropriate development in line with the
Transforming Brimbank 2020 Agenda, and the Brimbank
Response Strategy to the Western Rail Plan including
Melbourne Airport Rail and Sunshine Super Hub.
Council adopted the Sunshine Priority Precinct 2050 Vision;
Leading with Vision
: A
City Ready to Shine at the 6 April Council Meeting. This future vision sets the strategic
direction for the Transforming Brimbank agenda and will guide all future strategic work
within the precinct.
Implement business support activities identified in the
Brimbank COVID-19 Response and Recovery Strategy
including delivery of:
• COVID-19 business communications
• Business Grants Program
• Business Activation Program
Council delivered the business support and information initiatives identified in the
Brimbank COVID-19 Response and Recovery Strategy including:
• Bi-weekly meetings of the COVID-19 Business Taskforce to inform Council’s ongoing
business response and recovery program
• Establishment and implementation of the Brimbank Business Recovery Grants program
• Establishment of the Brimbank business website brimbankbusinesslink.com.au
• Regular business e-bulletins promoting the range of business grants, information and
assistance available
• Brimbank Activation Program which included 61 events, including 28 across Brimbank
Local Activity Centres
(continued)
Major initiatives
Progress
Implement recommendations arising from the local
homelessness research project.
Work commenced on a number of actions identified in the Homelessness Implementation Plan
which included:
• Wrote to Federal and State Housing Ministers, as well as local Members of Parliament,
forwarding a copy of the Research Report and offered to brief on key findings
• Published a new homelessness webpage on Council’s website, including support
services, up-to-date emergency relief, and Council’s research and Homelessness
Implementation Plan
• Provided support, information and referrals for people experiencing homelessness in
Brimbank
• Co-hosted (with Darebin City Council) the Inter Council Affordable Housing Forum
Implement education and employment advocacy
initiatives identified and prioritised within the Brimbank
Advocacy Plan and Framework, including the Transforming
Brimbank 2020 Jobs and Education Agendas.
• Brimbank City Council and Victoria University signed a Memorandum of Understanding.
• Council received $8 million from the Working for Victoria scheme to hire up to 165 local
workers
• A Jobs and Skills Taskforce for the Western Metropolitan Melbourne Region is
established.
• Council received a $660,000 State Grant to engage up to four local Job Advocates across
community facilities, to assist disadvantaged jobseekers to connect with employment,
skill and learning opportunities.
Services
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2020-2021 Budget and the persons or sections of the
community who are provided the service.
Service/Description
Net cost
actual budget
favourable/
(unfavourable) $’000
Community Learning and Community Participation
Community Learning and Participation
delivers a diverse range of library, learning, arts and culture and community
strengthening services and programs through Brimbank’s five libraries, seven neighbourhood houses, the St Albans Community
Centre, the Bowery Theatre and Brimbank Learning Futures.
Library Services
include quality collections and computer and wireless internet access. Libraries support customers with research
and information and provide places for study, reading and socialising. Library programs support lifelong learning and help foster a
culture of reading and literacy. The Online library and home library service ensure lifelong learning is accessible to all age groups and
abilities.
Council’s seven
Neighbourhood Houses
provide community strengthening activities and programs that meet the needs and
aspirations of the local community. They bring people together to connect, learn, create and contribute to their local community.
They offer rooms for hire, capacity building activities such as volunteering as well as deliver short courses and workshops. They
coordinate the Brimbank Neighbourhood Houses Strategic Partnership Agreement and enter into Collaborative Partnership
Agreements with community groups and organisations to deliver programs and services to the community.
The
Arts and Culture Unit
operates the St Albans Community Centre and the Bowery Theatre. It supports artists and fosters local
creativity, commissions and manages public art and spaces, manages and curates Council’s visual art collection and exhibitions
and manages the Festival and Arts Grants Program. The Arts and Culture Unit works within a community cultural development
framework to engage with vulnerable community members through arts and cultural based activities.
Learning
implements the Brimbank Lifelong Learning Strategy and the Brimbank Youth Jobs Strategy, facilitates partnerships to
increase local learning opportunities and promotes lifelong learning. Brimbank Learning Futures facilitates pathways for young
people and others into training or employment
9,333 12,625
3,292
Performance (continued)
Our Goal –
A Prosperous
Community
Major initiatives (continued)
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
52
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
53
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
03 Performance
I
Our Goal: A Prosperous Community | Our Goal: A Prosperous Community
City Strategy
City Strategy
is responsible for strategic planning, economic development and place management.
Strategic Planning
prepares strategies for land use planning and development including Housing, Heritage, Activity Centres
and Industrial Precincts, and also maintains the Brimbank Planning Scheme. The Strategic Planning Unit is also responsible for
amendments to the Brimbank Planning Scheme.
Economic Development
provide a range of support to businesses to promote growth and development. The Economic
Development Unit delivers Council’s Business Development and Networking Program, manages iHarvest Coworking Sunshine,
and coordinates delivery of the Brimbank Economic Development Strategy and Experience Brimbank Visitor Strategy. The
Economic Development Unit is also a key contact for business and investment inquiries, and has a key role in promoting Brimbank’s
development potential.
The
Sunshine Rising and Go St Albans Place Management Programs
include the administration of the Sunshine and St Albans
Marketing and Business Development Special Rate Programs, Sunshine and St Albans Partnership Groups and coordinating the
delivery of the Actions Plans associated with both centres to promote their growth and development.
2,991 3,405
414
Service performance indicators
The following statement provides the result of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation of material
variations.
Service
indicator
2018 result
2019 result
2020 result
2021 result 2021 commentary
Library collection
usage
5.84
5.48
3.90
3.75
Brimbank City Council library collection continues to be well
utilised with community members accessing both printed and
digital materials at our five library branches and through the home
library service. Due to COVID-19, our libraries were closed for
much of the year and alternative service models were introduced
including, ‘Libraries at Your Door’ and Click and Collect services.
Council saw a slight decrease in comparison to the previous year,
however a 51% overall increase in borrowing of e-resources was
noted throughout the 2020-2021 financial year. Find out more
about Brimbank libraries at www.brimbanklibraries.vic.gov.au
Standard of
library collection
58.63% 64.38% 67.66%
78.54%
Brimbank City Council's library collection continues to be
reflective of community needs and demands with over 78% of
the collection under five years of age. This 16% improvement
when compared to the 2019-20 result is attributed to updated
purchasing and maintenance systems that saw a 100% of
customer requests for library collection items purchased. This
improved result remains in the range expected by Council. Find
out more about Brimbank libraries at www.brimbanklibraries.vic.
gov.au
Cost of library
service per
population
$35.69
$36.00
$34.36
$33.38
Brimbank City Council has continued to work towards ensuring the
cost of the library service remains stable whilst modifying service
delivery to ensure residents could safely access Brimbank’s library
collections throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Examples of the
ways in which the library service continued within COVID-19 (Stay
at Home) restrictions included the non-contact home delivery
service, ‘Libraries at Your Door’ and Click and Collect services. This
result sees a 2.45% cost reduction compared to 2019-20 and
remains within the result set by Council. Find out more about
Brimbank libraries at www.brimbanklibraries.vic.gov.au
Active library
members
12.55%
12.01%
20.27%
11.97%
Brimbank City Council continues to see a steady demand for
library services irrespective of the ongoing challenges the library
service is confronted with throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.
Despite service closures, residents have continued to access
the library collection via alternative service models including,
‘Libraries at Your Door’ and Click and Collect. A technical error was
identified from the 2019-2020 reporting and auditing period that
overstated the number of active library borrowers. The actual
result for this period was 12.09% highlighting a consistent result
over the past three years that remains in the range expected
by Council. Find out more about Brimbank libraries at www.
brimbanklibraries.vic.gov.au
Our Goal –
A Prosperous
Community
Our Goal –
An Innovative
and Responsive
‘Community First’
Council
• Council is fair, honest and transparent
• Council advocates and works in the interests of our community
• Council manages its assets and finances sustainably and responsibly
• Council staff are high performing and community-focused
Strategic indicators
The following statement reviews the performance of Council against the Council Plan including results achieved in relation to the strategic
indicators included in the Council Plan.
Strategic indicator/measure
Result
2021 commentary
Resident perception of Council’s overall
performance
65
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 1 point higher than
the score in 2020, 4 points higher than the state average and 2 points
lower than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s
performance in customer service
75
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 2 points higher than
the score in 2020, 5 points higher than the state average and 1 point
higher than the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s performance
in community consultation and engagement
59
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 5 points higher than
the score in 2020, 3 points higher than the state average and the same
score as the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s performance
in informing the community
62
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 4 points higher than
the score in 2020, 2 points higher than the state average and the same
score as the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s performance
regarding decisions made in the interest of
the community
61
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 3 points higher than
the score in 2020, 5 points higher than the state average and the same
score as the Metro region.
Resident perception of Council’s performance
in lobbying on behalf of the community
58
The 2021 Community Satisfaction Survey result is 3 points higher than
the score in 2020, 3 points higher than the state average and 2 points
higher than the Metro region.
Major initiatives
The following statement reviews the progress of Council in relation to major initiatives identified in the 2020-2021 Budget for the year.
Major initiatives
Progress
Develop and execute an Implementation Plan for
Local Government Act
amendments.
Implementation Plan developed. Deliverables included:
• Mandatory Candidate Training
• Governance Rules
• Public Transparency Policy
• Audit and Risk Committee Charter
• Councillor Expenses Policy
• Review of delegations and authorisations
• Mandatory Councillor induction
• Conflict of interest training
• Implementation of Amended Personal Interest Returns Process
• Implementation of Conduct During Elections Policy
• Councillor Code of Conduct
• Community Engagement Policy
• Councillor Gifts Policy
• Annual Budget
• Councillor and Mayoral allowances
Performance (continued)
(continued)
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
54
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
55
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
03 Performance
I
Major initiatives
Progress
Our Goal: An Innovative and Responsive ‘Community First’ Council
Provide the community with increased awareness and assistance in using
both online services including live chat and self-service options to access
information.
Throughout 2020-21 the Customer Service team continued to
support high levels of service access via online customer service
channels including the delivery of 3169 live chat enquiries.
Additional customer channels included:
• 13,408 face to face counter enquiries
• 135,890 phone contacts
• 14,052 email enquiries
Work continued throughout the year on the development of chatbot
software (virtual assistant) which will allow the community to
engage in an on-line chat by text, 24 hours per day.
Implement a range of advocacy initiatives identified and priorities within
the Brimbank Advocacy Plan and Framework and as outlined in the 2020
Transforming Brimbank Agenda, including Council’s priorities around jobs,
education, the St Albans Leisure Centre Replacement Project, sports and
recreation, and environmental equity.
Initiatives and outcomes included:
• Council endorsed the 19 Point Advocacy Plan for COVID Response
and Recovery and the Sunshine Priority Precinct Vision 2050
• Federal and State Governments announced $8 million for the
Ballarat Road and Hulett Street intersection
• Mayor Cr Rasic announced the ‘Fix the Calder Freeway’ Campaign
• Brimbank City Council received State Government Sport and
Recreation grants totalling $625,000
• Council received a $330,00 grant to engage and support migrant
communities through sport with Brimbank and Victoria University
• Council received $750,000 from the State Government to upgrade
Deer Park West Kindergarten
• Brimbank identified as a priority rollout site for a new State
Government mental health and wellbeing hub
• Council welcomed over $2.2 million from the State Government for
two pocket park projects, Cary Street (Sunshine North) and Leslie
Street (St Albans)
State Government funding announcements included:
• $50 million towards fixing the Calder Freeway
• $2 million for Calder Freeway, Green Gully Road and Arundel Road
Interchange, Keilor
• $950,000 for local environmental and stormwater projects, including
Upper Stony Creek and Dempster Reserve
• $500,000 for the Keilor Park Reserve Female Friendly Project.
• $150,000 Empowering Communities through Football Grant,
including Brimbank focus
• $7.9 million for upgrading St Albans East Primary School
• $9.4 million to deliver an additional 10 beds and refurbishments at
Westside Lodge in order to improve mental health and alcohol and
other drug treatment services
• $1.08 million for upgrading Bon Thomas Reserve in Deer Park,
including a new asphalt car park, multi-purpose cricket nets,
irrigation upgrade for the oval and a new path network for the
reserve
• $17.8 million to implement trials in Brimbank-Melton and Goulburn
of a new whole-of-family support model that focuses on vulnerable
families with multiple health, justice or human services needs
• $263.8 million to establish the first 20 new mental health services
across the State, including a service in Brimbank
Our Goal –
An Innovative
and Responsive
‘Community First’
Council
(continued)
Major initiatives
Progress
Continue to build upon the ‘Welcome. We are Brimbank’ campaign to promote
People, Pride and Places in Brimbank.
The ‘Welcome. We are Brimbank’ business campaign was implemented
in late 2020.
A ‘Local Is Brimbank’ video campaign was created to strengthen the
emotional connection community members have with local business by
highlighting how local businesses contribute to the local community.
Work also continued on the creation of an extended series of ‘Brimbank
Delights’ videos, which showcase some of the local delights.
Through social channels there was a monthly update on ‘things to
do in Brimbank’ which showcased events and attractions that make
Brimbank a great place to visit and explore.
Prepare and implement the Council General Election 2020 Plan and
Induction Program.
The Election Plan and Induction Program were implemented. They
included meeting all requirements under the
Local Government Act
2020
, working with Victorian Electoral Commission to ensure they
had timely information, and implementing an induction program for all
Councillors that complied with the
Local Government Act 2020
and the
Local Government (Governance and Integrity) Regulations 2020
.
Help combat the spread of COVID-19 across Brimbank and assist to
mitigate negative impacts on health, wellbeing and the economy through
the implementation of the Brimbank Coronavirus (COVID-19) Response &
Recovery Strategy.
Monthly COVID-19 Response and Recovery Strategy updates detailing
progress of actions were presented to Council.
Services
The following statement provides information in relation to the services funded in the 2020-2021 Budget and the persons or sections of the
community who are provided the service.
Service/description
Net cost
actual budget
favourable/
(unfavourable) $’000
Governance
Governance
supports Council’s formal decision making processes and structures by:
• Coordinating the Ordinary and Special Council Meeting cycle and reporting requirements
• Overseeing and coordinating Council’s delegations
• Overseeing and coordinating Council’s compliance with legislative governance obligations, including the requirements of the
Local
Government Act 2020
, the
Privacy and Data Protection Act 2014
, the
Freedom of Information Act 1982
• Providing in-house legal and privacy compliance advisory services
• Supporting the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and Councillors with administrative and procedural services, and by providing calendar and
event management services
• Providing advice to Councillors in relation to the Councillor Code of Conduct
• Assisting Councillors with portfolio responsibilities, including by facilitating Councillor Portfolios
• Responding to enquiries/investigations from integrity agencies such as the Victorian Ombudsman, the Local Government
Inspectorate and the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission
6,131 6,691
560
Media and Communications
Media and Communications
leads communication with the community on behalf of Council. This department
provides an end to end central service for Council in the planning and execution of communication supporting
Council’s programs, services and advocacy. This communication occurs through a variety of methods and channels to
reach all corners of the community.
These channels include mainstream and local media, corporate publications and posters, advice and consultation,
website and social media, advertising, speeches and events.
By promoting Brimbank through these channels, the community is kept up to date with relevant information relating
to where they live, work and socialise.
2,345 2,637
292
Performance (continued)
Our Goal –
An Innovative
and Responsive
‘Community First’
Council
(continued)
Performance (continued)
Major initiatives (continued)
Major initiatives (continued)
This page to be updated to 2019-2020
This page to be updated to 2019-2020

image
56
I
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021
Brimbank City Council
Annual Report 2020-2021 I
57
01 Introduction
I
Text here
I
Text here
Service/Description
Net cost
actual budget
favourable/
(unfavourable) $’000
Financial Services
Financial Services
provides a fully integrated financial service and support function across Council. It is supported by two core units
- Finance and Business Support.
Finance
is responsible for calculating and collecting annual rates and charges as well as valuing every property within the
municipality, and for coordinating the preparation of the annual financial statements, monitoring Council’s cash and investments to
maximise interest earnings, paying suppliers and ensure compliance with legislation, and accounting standards.
Finance provides strategic and operational risk services, insurance and claims management, and coordinates business continuity
planning and reviews.
It delivers a fraud awareness program for the organisation, is responsible for protected disclosure reporting and facilitates Council’s
internal audit function and supports the Audit and Risk Committee.
Business Support
coordinates the Annual Budget and Long Term Financial Plan. It also provides financial analysis of Council’s
business to help support decisions, maintains and supports Council’s financial systems and provides training to staff, and maintains
policies and procedures.
In addition, Business Support provides management of strategic policies, procedures and guidelines for Council’s purchases of goods
and services, by providing a centralised process for all public tenders and assistance with procurement matters across all service
units providing procurement advice, governance on procurement activities and where required conducts procurement activities on
behalf of Council.
5,582 5,895
13
Customer Support
Customer Support
provides professional services through a number of contact channels including over the phone, live chat,
face-to-face and written communications to best meet the needs of customers at the initial point of contact.
Customer Support also is responsible for gathering, monitoring and analysing customer feedback to better understand the
customer experience and to drive service delivery improvement programs.
Information Management
services are also provided which include the registration, management, storage and retrieval
of all information received by Council in accordance with legislative requirements. All service processes are designed around
optimal use of digital practices and consideration of technology opportunities.
3,421 3,534
113
People and Performance
People and Performance
provides support services to the organisation including payroll, human resources, learning
and development, employee relations, Occupational Health and Safety, and return to work.
Positive performance is driven through learning and development programs while promoting positive organisational
values and behaviours, change management and human resources.
Staff health and wellbeing is managed with the implementation of occupational health and safety programs, managing
return to work effectively and ongoing education about injury prevention and management.
3,545 3,333
(212)
Projects and Innovation
Information Communication Technology (ICT)
provides a consistent level of support and service to all Council departments to
ensure continuity and efficiency. It offers support with existing and new specialist systems/applications and manages ICT hardware
and infrastructure including security.
The Innovation Team aims to improve customer experience by improving/transforming Council service offerings through the
management of end to end business improvement initiatives by optimising people, processes and technology.
8,472 10,061
1,589
Service performance indicators
The following statement provides the result of the prescribed service performance indicators and measures including explanation of material variations.
Service
indicator
2018 result
2019 result
2020 result
2021 result 2021 commentary
Efficiency
Average
residential rate
per residential
property
assessment
$1,647.32 $1,658.43 1,679.09
1,668.52
Resident population is the main determinant of service demand
and costs. The result is within the range expected by Council.
Expenses
per property
assessment
$2,487.71 $2,462.90 2,607.67
2,599.91
The result is within the range expected by Council.
Resignations
and terminations
compared to
average staff
8.7%
9.4%
12.5%
12.9%
Council has seen a slight increase in staff turnover in 2020-2021
when compared to 2019-2020. The main driver impacting this
has been the recruitment of temporary contracted staff through
the Working for Victoria Program. This result remains in the range
expected by Council.
Liquidity
Current assets
compared to
current liabilities
234.55% 161.79% 182.94
172.38%
The current and forecasted figures have decreased due to
reduced cash balances held for carry forward capital works.
Unrestricted
cash compared to
current liabilities
75.01% 41.46% 50.16%
62.32%
The 2020-2021 result reflects the increased cash balances due to
borrowings to fund capital works to be completed in future years.
Obligations
Asset renewal
compared to
depreciation
57.54% 66.43% 70.30%
Retired in
2020
This measure was replaced by asset renewal and upgrade
compared to depreciation in 1 July 2019.
Asset renewal
and upgrade
compared to
depreciation
New in 2020 New in 2020 103.26%
106.99%
The increase reflects the increased expenditure on renewal and
upgrade to capital works in 2021-2022.
Loans and
borrowings
compared to
rates
42.08% 39.60% 39.50%
54.25%
The 2020-2021 result has increased due to the borrowing of $33
million to fund capital works. The forecasted figures are projected
to reduce with the repayments of the loans.
Loans and
borrowings
repayments
compared to
rates
2.98%
2.90%
21.30%
4.93%
The previous year reflects the payout of an interest only loan
that was due in 2019-2020 and refinanced in the same year. The
2020-2021 and forecasted figures reflect increase repayments
due to the new loan of $33 million in 2020-2021.
Non-current
liabilities
compared to own
source revenue
40.00% 20.75% 39.05%
52.11%
The 2020-2021 result has increased due to the borrowing of $33
million to fund capital works. The forecasted figures are projected
to reduce with the repayments of the loans.
Operating
Position
Adjusted
underlying
surplus (or
deficit)
6.15%
9.60%
2.22%
2.84%
The decrease in the forecast results reflects the effect of
COVID-19 on user fee income in the short term and the increase
of material and employee expenditure requirements.
Our Goal –
An Innovative
and Responsive
‘Community First’
Council
Performance (continued)
Performance (continued)
Services (continued)
(continued)
03 Performance
I
Our Goal: An Innovative and Responsive ‘Community First’ Council
Our Goal –
An Innovative
and Responsive
‘Community First’
Council

image
58
I
Brimbank City Council