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Brimbank
Economic
Development
Strategy
2022-2027

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Acknowledgements
Brimbank City Council respectfully acknowledges and recognises the Wurundjeri and Bunurong Peoples as the
Traditional Custodians of this land and pays respect to their Elders, past, present and future.

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The Brimbank Economic Development Strategy was prepared by Urban Enterprise in collaboration with Brimbank City Council.
We would like to acknowledge the contributions of stakeholders in the preparation of this strategy, including local
businesses, traders associations, state government departments, industry leaders and Council officers and Councillors.
Glossary of Terms
Gross Regional Product The total value of final goods and services produced in the region over the period of one year.
Local Expenditure
Represents the value of intermediate goods and services purchased by local industry
sectors within the region. A high level of local expenditure on intermediate goods and
services proportionate to total output is indicative of well developed local supply chains
and also that any expansion in this sector would typically deliver broad based benefits
for the region’s economy.
Output
Represents the gross revenue generated by businesses/organisations in each of the
industry sectors in a defined region. Gross revenue is also referred to as total sales or
total income.
Regional Exports
Represents the value ($) of goods and services exported outside of the defined region
that have been generated by businesses / organisations in each of the industry sectors
within the region.
Value-Added
Represents the marginal economic value that is added by each industry sector in a
defined region. Value-Added can be calculated by subtracting local expenditure and
expenditure on regional imports from the output generated by an industry sector,
or alternatively, by adding the Wages & Salaries paid to local employees, the gross
operating surplus and taxes on products and production.
Acronyms
ABR
Australian Business Register
ABS
Australian Bureau of Statistics
BILS
Brimbank Industrial Land Strategy
BCC
Brimbank City Council
C1Z
C
ommercial 1 Zone
C2Z
C
ommercial 2 Zone
CBD
Central Business District
CSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and
Industrial Research Organisation
EDS
Economic Development Strategy
IN1Z Industrial 1 Zone
IN2Z
Industrial 2 Z
one
IN3Z Industrial 3 Zone
LGA
L
ocal Government Area
MAR Melbourne Airport Rail
NEIC
National Employment and
Innovation Cluster
NIEIR National Institute of Economic and
Industry Research
SEIFA Socio-Economic Index for Areas
SHWEP Sunshine Health Wellbeing and
Education Precinct
SSIP
State Significant Industrial Precinct
SRL
Suburban Rail L
oop
VPA
Victorian Planning Authority
VRET Victorian Renewable Energy Targets
VU
Vict
oria University
WAGA W
estern Alliance for Greenhouse Action
WIFT Western Intermodal Freight Terminal
WOMEDA W
est of Melbourne Economic
Development Alliance
Brimbank City Council | Economic Development Strategy 2022-2027

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Table of Contents
01 Introduction
01
1.1 Overview
02
1.2 Purpose
02
1.3 Approach & Process
03
1.4 What is Economic Development?
04
1.5 Local Government’s Role
05
02 Strategic and Economic Context 06
2.1 Location
07
2.2 Western Melbourne Region
08
2.3 Brimbank’s Key Economic Areas
10
2.3.1 Activity Centres
11
2.3.2 Industrial Precincts
12
2.3.3 Sunshine National Employment
and Inno
vation Cluster
13
2.4 Economic Priorities for Brimbank
14
2.4.1 Economic Vision for Brimbank
15
2.4.2 City Shaping Project
16
03 Population and Demographics 18
3.1 Population Snapshot
19
3.2 Socio-Economic Profile
20
3.3 Growth Projections
21
04 Brimbank's Economy
22
4.1 Brimbank's Economy at a Glance
23
4.1.1 Economic Pillars
24
4.2 Existing Industry Specialisations
26
4.2.1 Manufacturing
27
4.2.2 Transport, Postal & Warehousing 28
4.2.3 Construction
29
4.2.4 Wholesale Trade
29
4.2.5 Healthcare & Social Assistance
30
4.2.6 Education & Training
31
4.2.7 Retail Trade
32
05 Employment Profile
33
5.1 Jobs by Industry
34
5.2 Unemployment
35
5.3 Occupations
36
06 Strategic Framework
37
6.1 Priorities for the Strategy
38
6.2 Vision, Themes & Strategic Goals
41
6.3 Action & Implementation Plan
42
6.4 Targets and Monitoring
58
07 Appendix
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Brimbank City Council | Economic Development Strategy 2022-2027

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01
Introduction
01

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1.2 Purpose
This Economic Development Strategy (the Strategy) aims
to leverage public and private sector investment that is
planned and underway, whilst building on the extensive
work undertaken by, and for Brimbank City Council and
other Government bodies.
The aim of this Strategy is to grow and support the local
economy over the next five years through:
• Business development, support and growth
• Investment attraction and facilitation
• Employment participation and growth.
A Background Report has been prepared to support this
Strategy, and includes extensive research and analysis
relevant to Brimbank’s economy, consultation findings,
and a discussion of the key issues and opportunities to
be addressed in the Strategy.
Please refer to the
Background Report
for detailed
research and analysis that underpins the strategic
framework and action plan.
1.1 Overview
Brimbank municipality is in the midst of transformational
change driven by a combination of:
• Macroeconomic trends brought about by the COVID-19
pandemic
• Strong regional population and jobs growth
• Substantial investment in major infrastructure
projects across industry, transport, health, education
and community sectors.
The COVID-19 pandemic and the measures put in place
to curb its spread affected Brimbank’s economy, with
recurring and lengthy lockdowns that forced many
businesses to temporarily close. Other impacts included
disruptions to demand conditions and supply-chains,
and a sharp reduction in migration and population. These
factors combined to affect businesses in many different
ways, including:
• Challenging operational and financial conditions
• Difficulty finding workers
• Gaps in skills and qualifications.
In 2022, Brimbank City Council is seeking to move
beyond the pandemic response and recovery phase and
move into a growth phase over the next five years to
strengthen the municipality’s position as the Centre of
Melbourne’s West.
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Introduction
Strategic Context
Review and assess local, regional and state objectives
and priorities relevant to economic development.
Background Report
Prepare a Background Report that summarises research,
analysis and consultation.
Economic Research and Analysis
Profile Brimbank’s economy and assess industry and
employment specialisations and areas of advantage.
Assess trends that are influencing Brimbank’s economy
including macroeconomic conditions, growth and land
use change, technological and environmental changes
and innovations.
Consultation
Engage with local business, industry and community
representatives, as well as local and state Government
stakeholders to discuss issues, economic development
priorities and opportunities.
Issues and Opportunities
Identify and discuss issues and opportunities for
Brimbank’s economy, and prioritise those to be
addressed, facilitated and investigated in the Strategy.
Strategic Framework + Economic
Development Strategy
Prepare a 5-year Strategy that includes strategic
themes, goals, objectives, action and implementation
plan.
1.3 Approach and Process
This Strategy considers the economic and demographic
trends, and macroeconomic influences impacting the
local and regional economy. The research and analysis
presented in this Strategy and Background Report
highlights the issues to be addressed and opportunities
to unlock to achieve positive outcomes for Brimbank’s
economy and community.
The information in this Strategy is informed by
independent research and analysis, as well as
consultation with representatives of businesses and
industry, State Government departments and Brimbank
City Council stakeholders.
F1. Approach and Process
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1.4 What is Economic Development?
The purpose of economic development at the local level
can be described as follows:
To build the economic
capacity of a local area to improve
its economic future and the quality
of life for all. It is a process whereby
partners work collectively to
create better conditions for
economic growth, investment
and employment.
The pursuit of economic development requires a wide
range of activities, initiatives and processes that improve
the economic wellbeing and quality of life for the
community.
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Brimbank City Council | Economic Development Strategy 2022-2027

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Introduction
New Investment Attraction and Facilitation
Economic Recovery Services
Economic Data Analyses and Reporting
Industry Research
Placemaking
Mainstreet Activation
Training Sessions
Business Networking Sessions
Business Mentoring
Strategic Needs Assessment for Industry
Job Market Facilitation
Annual Business Awards
Managing International Relations
Business Incubator/ Centre
Management of Special/ Differential/ Retail Rates
69%
65%
59%
51% 50% 49%
46% 46% 44%
38%
27%
19%
15% 14% 12%
1.5 Local Government’s Role
Local Government plays an important role in
supporting and facilitating economic growth within
their municipalities. Typically, local Governments
role in economic development includes the
following core functions:
• Business engagement, development and support
• Investment attraction and facilitation in business,
infrastructure, land use and development
• Supporting liveability initiatives and programs
• Advocating and partnering with public and private
sector stakeholders.
Economic development requires an integrated, whole of
government approach that can be achieved through an
Economic Development Strategy with clear objectives
and measurable actions aligned with Council’s other
strategies and activities.
In terms of economic growth, it is important for local
Governments to provide and encourage an economic
environment conducive to attracting and facilitating
investment, innovation and entrepreneurial activities.
The chart below summarises the core services
of economic development practitioners across
Victorian councils.
Source: Survey of Economic Development Practitioners, Urban Enterprise + Economic Development Australia, 2021
F2. Primary Role of Economic Development Units - EDA - Victoria
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02
Strategic
and Economic
Context
06

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Strategic and Economic Context
F3. Brimbank Municipality and Districts
2.1 Location
Brimbank is a municipality in the centre of western
Melbourne which includes 25 suburbs across five local
‘districts’, each possessing a distinct identity, culture and
heritage.
The municipality is located between 11 and 23 kilometres
north and west of the Melbourne Central Business
District (CBD) and is centrally positioned between the
CBD and fast growing residential areas in the west
(Melton and Wyndham municipalities).
Brimbank is well served by an extensive road network
that includes the Calder Freeway, the Western Ring
Road, Deer Park Bypass, Melton Highway and Western
Highway. Passenger and freight rail connections
include the Sydenham rail line, Melbourne-Ballarat
and Melbourne-Bendigo V-lines and the Melbourne
to Sydney and Melbourne to Adelaide passenger and
freight lines.
Transport nodes provide good internal and external
connections to central Melbourne, regional Victoria,
the Port of Melbourne, Port of Geelong Melbourne and
Avalon Airports and the Hume Freeway.
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2.2 Western Melbourne Region
Brimbank forms part of the western metropolitan
region, along with the municipalities of Hobsons Bay,
Maribyrnong, Melton, Moonee Valley and Wyndham.
By 2051 the region’s population is projected to almost
double from around 1 million to 1.90 million. By 2031,
employment is projected to increase from approximately
295,000 to 445,000 jobs.
Brimbank’s location is highly strategic, in that it is
situated within one of Australia’s fastest growing
corridors, bringing economic opportunity through
strong population, housing and business growth. Major
advantages of Brimbank as a place to do business are
linked to the following attributes.
1. Access to central
Melbourne, western
Victoria and regional
cities of Bendigo,
Ballarat and Geelong.
The municipality
is well-serviced
by road and rail
infrastructure,
including:
The Calder Freeway providing access to north and central Victoria, including
Regional Cities of Ballarat and Bendigo
Western Metropolitan Ring Road
West Gate Freeway
Metropolitan (Sunbury, Sydenham) and regional (Geelong, Bendigo and Ballarat)
rail lines
Melbourne Airport Rail (planned)
Western Rail Plan
Brimbank is highly connected to the metropolitan and regional transport network,
with further state-significant investment planned (Melbourne Airport Rail)
High quality transport infrastructure is critical for residents, workers, visitors and
businesses being able to efficiently access services, jobs and export avenues.
2. Proximity to markets
in western and
central Melbourne,
including:
Export avenues at the Port of Melbourne
Bay West and Western Intermodal Freight Terminal (future)
Melbourne and Avalon Airports
The nearby location of state-significant export avenues is a competitive
advantage for export-oriented sectors in Brimbank such as manufacturing,
logistics and distribution.
3. Major economic and
employment areas,
including:
The Western State Significant Industrial Precinct (SSIP)
Sunshine National Employment and Innovation Cluster (including the Sunshine
Metropolitan Activity Centre)
The Sunshine Priority Precinct
the Sunshine Health Wellbeing and Education Precinct (SHWEP)
Four major activity centres (St Albans, Sydenham, Brimbank Central, Deer Park
Regional and local industrial precincts.
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Strategic and Economic Context
Moonee Valley
Hobsons Bay
Wyndham
Melton
Brimbank
Calder Fwy
West Gate Fwy
Maribyrnong
Western Ring Rd
Deer Park Bypass
Western Fwy
Melbourne Airport
Essendon Airport
Avalon Airport
Port of Melbourne
Western Intermodal Freight
Terminal (Planned)
Brimbank
Western Metro Region
State Significant
Industrial Precinct
Regionally Significant
Industrial Precinct
WIFT
Train Line
CBD
Princes Fwy
Geelong
~45km
Ballarat
~70 km
F4. Western Metro Region
Figure 4 shows Brimbank’s location in the context of
Western Melbourne, and highlights major land use,
infrastructure and transport characteristics that are
fundamental to the productivity and output of the
local economy.
According to the Land Use Framework Plan (2021),
planning priorities for the region to 2050 that are
relevant to Brimbank include:
• Coordinate planning for the Western Industrial
Precinct and protect regionally-significant industrial
land from encroachment
• Develop the Sunshine National Employment and
Innovation Cluster (NEIC)
• Develop the network of activity centres across the
region
• Improve transport connections to activity centres and
industrial hubs, including the Sunshine and Werribee
NEICs and activity centres
• Support the growth of the freight and logistics sectors
in the region
• Expand the network of health and education facilities
and precincts.
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Western Ring Rd
Calder Fwy
Metropolitan Ring Rd
SYDENHAM
KEILOR
SUNSHINE
ST ALBANS
DEER PARK
Brimbank
Regionally Significant
Industrial Precinct
State Significant
Industrial Precinct
Major Activity Centre
Sunshine Metropolitan
Activity Centre
Sunshine NEIC
SHWEP
WIFT
Train Line
Train Station
Airport
Colour shades represent districts
WIFT
Melbourne Airport
2.3 Brimbank’s Key
Economic Areas
Brimbank enjoys a strong competitive advantage by
having dedicated employment areas (industrial, health
precincts) and an extensive activity centre network that
supports business and employment activity.
Brimbank’s key economic areas are primarily
dispersed across:
• A network of 55 Activity Centres
that support a
range of retail, hospitality, office, health, education,
community, recreation, civic and tourism uses.
• More than 2,000 hectares of industrial zoned
land across 12 key precincts
that support a range
of industrial-related activities such as manufacturing,
transport and logistics, construction, wholesaling,
warehousing and distribution.
F5. Key Economic Areas
• The Sunshine National Employment and
Innovation Cluster (NEIC)
, that encompasses
• The Sunshine Priority Precinct
• The Sunshine Metropolitan Activity Centre
• St Albans Major Activity Centre
• The Sunshine Health, Wellbeing and Education
Precinct (SHWEP).
• The proximity of Melbourne Airport to Brimbank
provides opportunity to:
A
ttract supply chain uses in sectors
including manufacturing, tourism, transport
and logistics, construction, wholesaling,
warehousing and distribution.
A
ttract investment and employment growth
in activities that require direct access to
Melbourne Airport.
Provide the potential for Brimbank to be part of
the Aerotropolis surrounding Melbourne Airport.
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Strategic and Economic Context
Local Activity Centre
Neighbourhood Activity Centres
Major Activity Centres
Metropolitan Activity Centres
Rail Line
Train Station
Private Local Activity Centres are excluded
Sunbury
Northern
Melbourne
Melton
CBD
ALBANVALE
KINGS PARK
F6. Activity Centre Network Brimbank
2.3.1 Activity Centres
Brimbank’s 55 Activity Centres support a range of retail,
hospitality, health, community, leisure, entertainment
and civic uses, services, businesses and jobs. Importantly,
they provide locations for residents, workers and visitors
to work, shop, eat, socialise and recreate.
Brimbank’s network of Activity Centres include:
• 1 Metropolitan Activity Centre (Sunshine)
• 4 Major Activity Centres (St Albans, Sydenham,
Brimbank Central, Deer Park)
• 6 Neighbourhood Activity Centres (Cairnlea, Taylors
Lakes, Keilor Village, Keilor Downs, Delahey, Derrimut)
• 44 Local Centres.
Activity Centres support liveable communities
underpinned by Plan Melbourne’s (2017) objective of the
20 minute neighbourhood, which is based on residents
accessing everyday needs within a 20-minute walk, cycle
or local public transport trip from their home.
Activity Centres also support the visitor economy,
which currently performs a tertiary role in Brimbank.
The municipality is not a traditional tourist destination,
but attracts non-residents and visitors for business,
corporate and education purposes, to attend festivals/
events and to visit friends and relatives.
Brimbank has potential to develop its dining, retail,
entertainment, accommodation and recreation product
to attract more visitors from outside of the municipality,
particularly from surrounding suburbs and municipalities
in western Melbourne.
Brimbank City Council has an existing Activity Centre
Strategy (2018) that supports the 20-minute
neighbourhood concept, and seeks to improve the
accessibility and attractiveness of centres through
investment in the public realm, and encouraging a mix of
uses.
This Economic Development Strategy acknowledges and
supports the directions for the municipality’s activity
centre network, including:
• Improving the accessibility of centres
• Improving the attractiveness (look and feel) and safety
of centres
• Encourage business friendly conditions that support
jobs and services
• Encourage a mix of uses
• Improve transport connections between the activity
centre network
• Encourage investment and reinvestment.
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Princes Fwy
Industrial
Employment
Transitional
Western State
Significant Industrial
Precinct
Brimbank's Industrial
Areas in WSSIP
Freight and Export
Locations
Freight Network
Rail
Brimbank LGA
CBD
Melbourne Airport
Essendon Airport
Western Intermodal Freight
Terminal (planned)
Calder Fwy
Deer Park Bypass
Western Ring Rd
0
2.5
5km N
1
2
3
5
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Port of Melbourne
Calder Park
Keilor Park
Tullamarine
Keilor East
St Albans
Sunshine North
Western
Highway
Orica
Derrimut
Sunshine West
Brooklyn
Sunshine
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12
Western Hwy
Hume Hwy
2.3.2 Industrial Precincts
Brimbank is one of the largest and most productive
industrial areas in Melbourne's west, with approximately
2,083 hectares of land zoned for industrial purposes.
This makes Brimbank’s industrial land a significant asset
for the state’s economic growth.
Brimbank’s industrial areas have significant advantages
with access to the Principal Freight Network, rail, arterial
roads, freeways, ports and airports and the ability to
accommodate a broad range of industrial uses and
business activity within a network of diverse small,
medium and large scale precincts.
In Brimbank, there are 12 key industrial areas/precincts
as shown in Figure 7.
Each precinct includes different site, location and built
form characteristics and perform different roles in the
business and industry types that are accommodated.
The role and function of industrial-related sectors is
discussed later in this Strategy.
Brimbank City Council’s Industrial Land Strategy (2018
- 2030) provides a framework and future directions for
industrial precincts; and primarily relate to protecting and
enhancing through reinvestment or transitioning over
time (subject to strategic justification). This Economic
Development Strategy acknowledges and supports the
directions for industrial land in the municipality.
F7.
Brimbank Industrial Land Use Fr
amework
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Strategic and Economic Context
2.3.3 Sunshine National Employment and Innovation Cluster (NEIC)
The Sunshine NEIC is a major economic driver that will
continue to emerge as a substantial provider of tertiary
education, health-related training, healthcare services,
medical research, education, transport, business and retail
services. It currently supports approximately 14,600 jobs
and is planned for substantial jobs and resident growth in
the future.
Through Melbourne Airport Rail, Sunshine will be the
first Metropolitan Activity Centre destination from
Melbourne Airport. This is a strategic advantage for the
Sunshine NEIC and there is an opportunity to leverage
this connection by incorporating accommodation, retail,
hospitality, entertainment and conference facilities
within the NEIC. Recent funding announcements for
the Sunshine Station Master Plan, Albion Station, and
construction of a new Station in Keilor East identify areas
of opportunity.
According to the Western Metro Land Use Framework Plan,
key directions for Sunshine NEIC include the following:
• Facilitate Sunshine NEIC’s development as a major
provider of tertiary education, health-related training,
healthcare services, medical research, education,
transport, business and retail services
• Encourage significant growth and land use change
to leverage transport infrastructure investment and
improved connectivity within and to the Sunshine NEIC
• Leverage investments in transport-related projects
by supporting accommodation, entertainment and
conference facility uses in the Sunshine Metropolitan
Activity Centre
• Improve connectivity to the Health, Wellbeing and
Education Precinct, Sunshine and St Albans Activity
Centres and industrial precincts
• Develop the Sunshine NEIC to provide major public
service facilities for the growth areas of Melton, Sunbury,
F8.
Sunshine NEIC
Wyndham and beyond to the western region of Victoria.
Source: Chapter 4 Productivity, Western Metro Land Use Framework Plan (Draft), DELWP 2021
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2.4 Economic Priorities for Brimbank
Brimbank City Council has a substantial body of strategic
work that is relevant to local economic development,
business, investment, local skills, community visioning,
precinct development and transport.
This Strategy is informed by, and aligns with existing
economic development priorities previously identified;
and seeks to build-on and implement priorities through
leadership, planning, advocacy and community
participation. The following documents directly informed
this Strategy.
Local
• Brimbank Council Plan 2021-2025
• Brimbank Community Vision 2040
• Brimbank Economic Development Strategy
2016-2020
• Brimbank Local Jobs for Local People 2021
• Brimbank Activity Centre Strategy 2018
• Brimbank Industrial Land Use Strategy 2018-2030
• Brimbank COVID-19 Response and Recovery
Strategy 2021
• Brimbank Transport Priorities Paper 2018
• Brimbank Cycling and Walking Strategy 2016
• Brooklyn Evolution 2016
• Brimbank Industry Analysis and Clusters
Development Action Plan 2019
• Experience Brimbank Visitor Strategy 2018
• Sunshine NEIC Economic Analysis 2021
• Sunshine Precinct Opportunity Statement 2021
• Sunshine Priority Precinct Vision 2050
• Sunshine Rising Action Plan 2019-2024
• Go St Albans Town Centre Action Plan 2019-2024.
Regional and State
• Plan Melbourne 2017
• Western Melbourne Regional Land Use Framework
Plan 2021
• Lead West Strategic Plan 2020-2030
• WoMEDA Economic Development Strategy 2017.
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Community Vision to 2040:
By 2040, the Brimbank community will
be healthy and safe and we will be united
through a sense of belonging and pride.
Our City will be inclusive, resilient,
innovative and vibrant and our people
will share equally in the City’s prosperity
and opportunity.
The environment and heritage will be
protected and enhanced and Brimbank’s
diverse neighbourhoods and housing will
offer something for everyone.
Together We Are Brimbank
(Strategic Direction):
Opportunity and Prosperity
• A future focused, transforming city where all have
opportunities to learn and earn
• a prosperous place for all
Strategic Objective -
Growing and Transforming
Optimise community opportunities through
infrastructure, innovation and investment
Strategic Objective - Earning and Learning
Everyone has access to education, training and
lifelong learning to support their aspirations.
2.4.1 Economic Vision for Brimbank
Together We are Brimbank
is Brimbank’s integrated
Council and Health and Wellbeing Plan (2021-25) that
outlines four key pillars over four years to help achieve
the long term Community Vision to 2040.
The Plan clearly defines the community’s hopes,
priorities and aspirations to make Brimbank an even
better place to live, work and play.
This Strategy acknowledges and aligns with Brimbank
City Council’s community vision and Council Plan.
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2019
2019
2020
2020
2021
2021
2022
2022
2023
2023
2024
2024
2025
2025
2026
2026
2027
2027
2028
2028
West Gate Tunnel
Level Crossing Removals
Metro Tunnel
North East Link
Melbourne Airport Rail
Suburban Rail Loop (East)
2.4.2 City Shaping Projects
Over the last decade over $2 billion in private and
public infrastructure investment has been delivered in
Brimbank, with further investment proposed for city
shaping projects.
The investments proposed:
• Are primarily concentrated in and around the Sunshine
Activity Centre
• Commonly relate to road and rail transport
infrastructure
• Include several community facilities and health,
wellbeing and education uses
• Include several employment precincts and retail
investments.
Transport
The Victorian Government is currently implementing the
largest transport infrastructure program in the state’s
history. City-shaping transport projects include:
• The West Gate Tunnel
– creating a second river
crossing to link the Western Metro Region with the
Port of Melbourne, CityLink and the CBD
• Melbourne Airport Rail
– connecting Melbourne
Airport to Victoria’s regional and metropolitan train
network
• Suburban Rail Loop
– connecting every major
passenger railway line in metropolitan Melbourne
• Level crossing removals
– including along the
Sunbury, Werribee, Bendigo and Geelong-Ballarat
railway lines
• Metro Tunnel
– linking Melbourne’s south-east and
Gippsland to the Sunbury line in Melbourne’s west and
north-west
• North East Link
– connecting Melbourne’s west
via the Western Ring Road and Hume Freeway to
Melbourne's south-east via the Eastern Freeway
• Western Rail Plan
– connecting Deer Park and Ardeer
to the more frequent metropolitan train network.
Once delivered, these projects will improve access to
jobs, education and social opportunities in Brimbank and
western Melbourne, and also better connect the region
with other areas of Melbourne and Victoria.
Source: 2050 Vision, Western Metro Land Use Framework Plan, DELWP
2021
F9. City-shaping transport projects
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Source: Sunshine Precinct - Precinct Opportunity Statement November, 2021
Strategic and Economic Context
F10. Sunshine Priority Precinct
Sunshine Priority Precinct
Within the NEIC is the Sunshine Priority Precinct.
The existing strengths in health, education and
manufacturing, coupled with major transport projects
will see Sunshine become the key centre of Melbourne's
booming west.
The Department of Transport (DoT) is leading the
strategic coordination and planning of the Sunshine
Priority Precinct. Modelling published by the DoT
estimates that the precinct will attract substantial jobs,
dwelling, and resident growth to 2051, including:
• An additional 18,000 jobs (to 29,000)
• An additional 5,000 dwellings (to 16,000)
• Between 28,000 to 43,000 additional residents.
Priority Precinct Vision:
Sunshine will be the centre of Melbourne’s booming
west. A dense and vibrant urban environment, the
precinct will provide high quality affordable housing and
strong employment growth.
The vision for the precinct is supported by four goals:
1. Transform Sunshine into the centre of
Melbourne’s west:
• Develop Sunshine into a major employment centre
• Attract new investment, create jobs and grow
industries (e.g. health, education)
• Create a greater diversity of jobs
• Intensify employment uses.
2. Increase the connectedness of
Sunshine’s neighbourhoods and hubs:
• Improve access to housing and jobs, and improve
connections within and through Sunshine
• Encourage diversity of housing options, including
affordable housing.
3. Make Sunshine a great place to live.
4. Improve outcomes for Sunshine’s
diverse communities.
Indicative Sunshine NEIC
(Boundary as per draft Land Use
Framework Plan)
Sunshine Precinct - 1600m
radius of stations
Sunshine Metropolitan
Activity Centre
Waterway
Road network
Open Space
Railway
Railway Station
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03
Population and
Demographics
18

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Population and Demographics
201,680
35
Estimated Residential
Population 2021
Median Age
2016
7%
7% 10%
16% 20% 12% 10% 7%
2%
8%
Primary Schoolers
(5 to 11)
Secondary Schoolers
(12 to 17)
Tertiary Education &
Independence (18 to 24)
Young Workforce
(25 to 34)
Parents & Homebuilders
(36 to 49)
Older Workers and
Pre-retirees (50 to 59)
Empty Nesters and
Retirees (60 to 69)
Seniors (70 to 84)
Elderly aged
(85 and over)
Babies & Pre-schoolers
(0 to 4)
Vietnamese
16.0%
Australian
12.4%
English
11.7%
Italian
6.5%
Chinese
6.4%
Top Ancestries 2016
3.1 Population Snapshot
Brimbank has a population of around 201,500
residents. The municipality has recorded consistent
moderate population growth over the past decade, but
experienced a decline in 2020 and 2021 due to COVID-19
impacts on migration.
Moderate growth is projected over the next 15 years,
with an additional 30,000 residents. The largest share
of the population growth is forecast to occur in Sunshine
and St Albans.
Other population and demographic considerations:
• International border closures throughout 2020 and
2021 impacted overseas migration to the municipality,
and is not expected to normalise until around 2024
• The median age of residents is 35 years, with a high
proportion of families and older couples
• Brimbank is a highly multi-cultural population, with
more than 50% of residents that speak a language
other an English.
F11. Population and Demographics at a Glance
19

image
F12. SEIFA Index by district
3.2 Socio-Economic Profile
The Socio-Economic Index for Areas (SEIFA) index
measures the relative level of socio-economic
disadvantage of an area, and is derived from indicators
such as income, education attainment, employment
participation, and job qualifications and skills.
A higher score on the index means a lower level of
disadvantage (or higher level of advantage). The national
average index score is 1,000, with a score below 1,000
on the index indicating that area has a higher level of
disadvantage relative to the national average.
Key observations in relation to Brimbank:
• Brimbank is the 7th most disadvantaged Local
Government Area in Victoria (out of 80), and the 2nd
most disadvantaged in metropolitan Melbourne
• Brimbank’s northern suburbs are relatively
advantaged, including Keilor (1038) and Taylors Lakes
(1037)
• Since 2011, the disadvantage gap narrowed in areas
such as Sunshine, Ardeer, Albion and St Albans, but
widened in areas such as Sydenham, Keilor Downs,
Cairnlea and Taylors Lakes.
Least
Disadvantaged
Most
Disadvantaged
SEIFA Score by SA2
(Change since 2011)
Source: ABS Stat, Dataset - SEIFA 2011 to 2016 by Local Government
Area (LGA)
City of Brimbank (LGA)
7
Rank with VIC
of 80
3 from 2011
Score
930
2 from 2011
Taylors Lakes
1037 (-11)
Sydenham
978 (-18)
Delahey
917 (-9)
Keilor Downs
965 (-14)
St Albans - North
864 (+4)
Kings
Park
865 (+1)
Deer Park -
Derrimut
948 (-2)
Cairnlea
988 (-12)
Sunshine - West
896 (+13)
Ardeer -
Albion
904 (+16)
Sunshine
North
884 (+13)
St Albans -
South
862 (+8)
Keilor
1038 (-9)
Sunshine
929 (+13)
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Population and Demographics
3.3 Growth Projections
Brimbank’s population is projected to increase to
approximately 234,000 by 2036. This represents an
increase of 24,000 residents, adding an average of 1,600
residents per annum.
A large share of the population growth is forecast to
occur in Sunshine, while St Albans and Keilor are also
expected to account for a significant share of the
projected population growth in Brimbank.
Key observations for age profile growth:
• The most significant growth is forecast to occur in
senior and elderly cohorts (i.e. over 70 years)
• The number of children and young adults is projected
to increase strongly over the period, especially those
in the young workforce age groups between 25 and
29 years
• Substantially lower growth is projected for middle
aged and pre-retiree (55 to 65 years) cohorts.
F13.
A
ge Structure Forecast by Cohort,
Brimbank, 2016 to 2041
Source: Population and household forecast, 2016-2041, prepared by .id
(informed decisions), 2021.
0-4
1,135 1,842 2,032 2,038
1,649 2,161 1,956 2,454
1,687
1,059 1,024
8,04 1,203 1,764 3,654 4,283
3,998 4,452
5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79
80-84 80-84
21

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04
Brimbank's
Economy
22

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Brimbank's Economy
Manufacturing
Transport, Postal
Construction
& Warehousing
Western Melbourne
1,098,400
208,247
(
19%
of Western Melbourne)
Population
GRP
Local Jobs
Businesses
$10.61 B
(
19%
of Western Melbourne)
89,620
(
21%
of Western Melbourne)
16,603
(
19%
Western Melbourne)
Western Melbourne
$55.70 B
Western Melbourne
422,241
Western Melbourne
85,676
Top 3 highest employing sectors (jobs)
4.1 Brimbank's Economy at a Glance
1
2
3
23

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4.1.1 Economic Pillars
Brimbank’s economy is diverse, and is primarily driven
by a combination of industrial-related activities
(manufacturing, transport, logistics, wholesale trade,
construction) and Activity Centre uses (retail, hospitality,
health, education, professional services).
Brimbank’s key economic pillars are summarised below.
Industry specialisations, clusters and anchors are shown
in Figure 14 on the following page. Due to the scale and
diversity of industrial sectors in the municipality, key
industrial activities are highlighted on Figure 14.
Industrial
• Manufacturing
• Transport + logistics
• Warehousing + distribution
• Wholesale Trade
• Construction
Key Locations:
Derrimut, Deer Park, Sunshine
West, Sunshine North, Brooklyn, Keilor Park,
Tullamarine, Ardeer
Knowledge +
Professional
• Professional Services
• Information media + telecommunications
• Administrative Services
• Real estate + property services
Key Locations:
Sunshine, St Albans
Health, Education +
Public Sector
• Education and training
• Health Care + social assistance
• Public administration + safety
Key Locations:
St Albans, Sunshine,
Deer Park
Retail, Hospitality +
Personal Services
• Retail + Service
• Hospitality Leisure, Entertainment
Key Locations:
Sunshine, St Albans,
Sydenham, Deer Park, Keilor, Taylors Lakes
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F14. Industry Specialisations Clusters, and Anchors
Brimbank's Economy
Industrial Cluster
Education Anchor (Tertiary institution or
major precinct)
Retail, Hospitality and Personal Services
Health/Medical Cluster
Legend
LGA
Train Line
Train Station
Key Activities
25

image
Key
Very High
High
Moderate
Low
Manufacturing
Transport, postal
and warehousing
Construction
14,732 jobs
Very High
Employment
11,836 jobs
Very High
Employment
11,126
Very High
Employment
$5.56 Billion
Very High
Output
$3.44 Billion
Very High
Output
$2.21 billion
High
Output
$4.3 billion
Very High
Export Value
$2.2 billion
Very High
Export Value
$2.2 billion
High Local
Sales
Education & Training
Health Care and
Social Assistance
Wholesale Trade
6,219 jobs
High
Employment
10,728 jobs
Very High
Employment
5,240 jobs
High
Employment
$722 million
Moderate
Output
$1.3 Billion
High
Output
$1.8 Billion
High
Output
$610 million
Moderate
local sales
$104 million
Low Export
Value
$1.1 billion
High Export
Value
Retail Trade
8,551 jobs
Very High
Employment
$900 million
High Output
4.2 Existing Industry Specialisations
Brimbank includes several highly specialised industry sectors that drive the economy in terms of generating output,
supporting jobs and creating export value.
26
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4.2.1 Manufacturing
Businesses
Jobs
Highest Employing sub-sectors
Exports
853 (26% of Western Melbourne)
14,732
1. Food products (2,765)
2. Furniture & other (1580)
3. Machinery & equipment (1,378)
$4.31 Billion
Manufacturing is Brimbank’s most productive and
highest-employing industry across all key economic
indicators, and represents a highly specialised sector for
the municipality. The manufacturing sector in Brimbank
represents approximately one quarter of the sector’s
jobs, businesses, output, value and exports across
Western Melbourne.
The primary manufacturing activities include
food, equipment, machinery, furniture, polymer,
petrochemicals, fabricated metal, transport equipment,
clothing and textiles manufacturing.
There is a clear clustering of manufacturing businesses
and employment in Sunshine that have established
over time, as a result of a well-established supply chain,
a highly entrenched regional workforce, available land
supply that suitable for business and access to the
transport network.
Existing Manufacturing clusters in Brimbank include:
• Food and Beverage – Food processing, beverage
manufacturing, food preparation and packaging,
speciality food and beverage product.
• Advanced Manufacturing – Machinery and equipment,
building materials, chemical and chemical products,
metal fabrication and engineering.
Manufacturing is critical to Australia’s economy and is a
vital part of Australia’s COVID-19 response to the global
supply-chain impacts, and the need to produce certain
goods locally.
The Federal Government acknowledges the importance
of the sector and recently prepared the Modern
Manufacturing Strategy (2021); which is a whole-of
government strategy aimed at helping manufactures
scale-up, and become more competitive and resilient.
The Strategy identifies several factors that are critical to
the future success of the industry:
• Access to skilled and productive labour
• Investment in technology and innovation
• Efficient regulatory mechanisms
• Favourable trade arrangements.
National priorities for the sector are well-aligned to some
of the municipality’s manufacturing activities, particularly
food and beverage, recycling and green energy.
Local and state priorities for Manufacturing in Brimbank
relate to attracting further investment in advanced
and emerging manufacturing activities, particularly in
and around the Sunshine NEIC. This would align with
Sunshine’s designation as a National Employment
and Innovation Cluster by strengthening existing
agglomeration and establishing new clusters where
possible.
Opportunities for the sector include medical equipment,
devices and apparatus, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology,
food and beverage, construction technologies, logistics
and transport technology.
Key indicators:
14,742 jobs
(25% of Western Melbourne)
$5.57 billion
economic output
(24% of Western Melbourne)
$4.31 billion exports
(27% of Western Melbourne)
$1.58 billion value-added
(25% of Western Melbourne)
Brimbank's Economy
27

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4.2.2 Transport, Postal & Warehousing
Businesses
Jobs
Highest Employing sub-sectors
Exports
3,869 (20% of Western Melbourne)
11,836
1. Road Transport (5,415)
2. Warehousing & Storage (2,328)
3. Postal & courier (1,871)
+2,113
Brimbank is a strategic location for the transport,
logistics and warehousing industry due to its close
proximity to Melbourne’s CBD, the Port of Melbourne,
Melbourne Airport, Essendon Airport and Avalon Airport,
and the major regional centres of Bendigo, Ballarat and
Geelong. Almost all of Melbourne’s interstate rail and
road transport connections run through, or are adjacent
to the municipality.
Transport, postal and warehousing makes a significant
contribution to the Brimbank economy (i.e. employment,
output, export-value), particularly road transport, and
warehousing and storage services sub-sectors.
The local industry in Brimbank accounts for
approximately one-fifth of businesses, jobs and output
across the broader Western region’s transport, postal
and warehousing.
In 2019-20, the Transport and Logistics sector in
Australia has an estimated annual revenue of $101.51
billion, adding $39.91 billion to the Australian economy.
The sector employs more than half a million people
across its major sub-sectors: Road Transport, Logistics
and Warehousing.
National employment in the sector is projected to grow
substantially to 2024, mostly relating to road freight,
road passenger, postal, couriers and pick-up services.
The implications of high demand for retail e-Commerce
on the industrial land market have been profound, with
substantial demand growth for warehousing, packaging,
distribution, transport and logistics floorspace to serve
the rise in demand.
The transport, logistics and warehousing sector
is experiencing strong tailwinds from growth and
development of local manufacturing activities and supply
chains, along with unprecedented growth in digital retail
and e-Commerce.
Whilst this has translated to record consumption rates
of industrial land across Melbourne, Brimbank’s local
transport, logistics and warehousing sector is well
placed to capitalise on the buoyant conditions and
outlook.
Key indicators:
11,836 jobs
(19% of Western Melbourne)
$3.44 billion economic
output
(17% of Western Melbourne)
$2.15 billion exports
(15% of Western Melbourne)
$1.34 billion value-added
(17% of Western Melbourne)
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4.2.3 Construction
Businesses
Jobs
3,240 (21% of Western Melbourne)
11,126
Highest Employing sub-sectors
Exports
1. Construction Services (7,625)
2. Building construction (2,858)
3. Heavy & civil engineering (642)
$580 million
Businesses
Jobs
672 (21% of Western Melbourne)
5,240
Highest Employing sub-sectors
Exports
1. Basic material wholesaling (1,167)
2. Grovery, liquor & tobacco (1,078)
3. Other goods (1,071)
$1.09 billion
C
onstruction is the third highest employing industry
in Brimbank and includes the second highest number
of businesses in the municipality. The sector largely
consists of residential building, non-residential building
and engineering construction.
Construction activities are weighted towards trades
and services such as carpentry, plumbing, electrical,
concreting, site preparation, air conditioning and heating,
plastering, painting, tiling and landscape construction.
Jobs in wholesale trade accounts for approximately one
quarter of jobs, output and value-added in the sector
across the Western Melbourne region, and more than
30% of export value.
4.2.4 Wholesale Trade
Key indicators:
5,240 jobs
(23% of Western Melbourne)
$1.80 billion economic
output
(25% of Western Melbourne)
$1.09 billion exports
(31% of Western Melbourne)
$806 million value-added
(25% of Western Melbourne)
Key indicators:
11,126 jobs
(22% of Western Melbourne)
$2.21 billion economic
output
(10% of Western Melbourne)
$11.7 million exports
(10% of Western Melbourne)
$580 million value-added
(10% of Western Melbourne)
Brimbank's Economy
29

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4.2.5 Healthcare & Social Assistance
Businesses
Jobs
Highest Employing sub-sectors
Exports
611 (15% of Western Melbourne)
10,728
1. Hospitals (3,325)
2. Social assistance (3,168)
3. Medical & other health care (2,783)
$878 million
Health care and social assistance makes a substantial
contribution to the Brimbank economy and is forecast to
continue its strong growth path.
Sunshine Hospital is one of Brimbank’s largest employers
and the most significant and fastest growing health
facility in Melbourne’s west. The designation of the
Sunshine NEIC also recognises the potential to attract
a critical mass of health-related activities relevant
to education and training, manufacturing, retail and
professional services.
Social assistance is also prevalent in Brimbank, with
numerous aged care and disability providers.
The health industry in Brimbank accounts for
approximately one quarter of Western Melbourne’s
employment, output and value-added within this sector.
The Health Care and Social Assistance industry is the
largest employing industry in Australia. Jobs in the
industry are projected to reach two million by 2025, with
higher demand for Aged and Disabled Carers (~45%) and
Welfare and Support Workers (~15%).
The health care sector is continuously evolving with the
COVID-19 pandemic, skilled staff shortages, government
policies and legislative changes, an ageing population,
and technological advancements driving change.
The health care role of Brimbank’s precincts such as the
SHWEP and in activity centres (e.g. general practitioners,
allied health services) and social assistance services (i.e.
aged, disability care) is expected to strengthen in future.
An ongoing challenge for the sector is addressing labour
shortages and skills gaps, as the employment needs
continue to grow.
Key indicators:
10,728 jobs
(25% of Western Melbourne)
$1.33 billion
economic output
(27% of Western Melbourne)
$104 million exports
(15% of Western Melbourne)
$878 million value-added
(27% of Western Melbourne)
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4.2.6 Education & Training
Businesses
Jobs
Highest Employing sub-sectors
Exports
143 (13% of Western Melbourne)
6,219
1. Preschool and School education (4,523)
2. Adult, community & other (990)
3. Tertiary education (706)
$505 million
Brimbank has a well-established education and training
sector, with two campuses of Victoria University at
Sunshine and St Albans (including Victoria Polytechnic).
Tertiary providers were heavily impacted by the
COVID-19 pandemic as international border closures
stopped in-bound student enrolments in 2020 and
2021. Tertiary institutions welcomed back international
students early in 2022, however the number of
enrolments are not expected to reach pre-pandemic
levels until 2024.
The higher education and TAFE sector in Brimbank
is complemented by an extensive network of state,
Catholic and independent primary and secondary
schools.
The Western Centre for Health, Research and Education
located at the Sunshine Hospital is a key education and
training facility, representing a partnership between
Victoria University, the University of Melbourne and
Western Health.
The education and training industry in Brimbank
accounts for approximately one fifth of Western
Melbourne’s output across the key economic indicators
within this sector.
This tertiary education sector in Brimbank will continue
to perform a critical role for the region in terms of
aligning service offerings with skill and qualification
needs of the region, improving employment pathways
and job readiness, and supporting upskilling and
reskilling.
Key indicators:
6,219 jobs
(19% of Western Melbourne)
$722 million economic
output
(20% of Western Melbourne)
$113 million exports
(19% of Western Melbourne)
$505 million value-added
(20% of Western Melbourne)
Brimbank's Economy
31

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4.2.7 Retail Trade
Businesses
Jobs
Highest Employing sub-sectors
Exports
890 (13% of Western Melbourne)
8,551
Other store-based retailing (4,534)
Food Retailing (2,960)
Motor vehicle & parts retailing (704)
$511million
Retail trade supports a significant share of business
and employment activity in Brimbank. The industry
is primarily represented across the municipality’s
55 activity centres, including the Sunshine
Metropolitan Activity Centre and four Major Activity
Centres in Watergardens, St Albans, Brimbank
Central and Deer Park.
Retail trade is generally a less productive industry
compared with others, given that businesses typically
operate on lower profit margins but a higher volume of
sales, meaning that productive value-add can be lower.
The COVID-19 pandemic caused a rapid shift in retail
buyer behaviour and a major increase in online retail
purchases. Nine million Australian households shopped
online in 2020 (82% of all households); an additional
one million compared with 2019.
Market share of online sales accounted for 16.3% in
2021; a level not anticipated until 2023 or beyond. A
shift towards working from home, regionalisation and
‘shop local’ campaigns has seen consumers access goods
closer to their home and spend on products that are
sourced or produced locally.
The strong growth in digital retailing and online
purchases is expected to continue. In response to
this disruption, bricks and mortar stores are investing
in facilities and services that improve consumer
engagement and the in-store ‘experience’. This includes
a greater focus on hospitality, entertainment and
meeting places co-located with retailers.
Retail strips with lower vacancies are those that
have evolved from simply occupying vacancies with
food and beverage outlets, and are increasing retail,
health and professional services such as massage,
yoga and fitness studios, dentists, medical clinics and
professional services.
Retail centres and strips are increasingly adopting a
‘place-based’ approach to expand the role of strips
to include civic and recreational destinations for
communities. Traders are working with local councils to
improve ‘place-making’ initiatives to promote a mix of
retail and amenities. This aims to better leverage existing
community assets such as public open space, recreation
and civic spaces, which aims to increase foot traffic and
community dwellers, with a view to benefitting retailers
and retail strips.
Key indicators:
8,551 jobs
(19% of Western Melbourne)
$899 million
economic output
(19% of Western Melbourne)
$153 million exports
(18% of Western Melbourne)
$511 million value-added
(19% of Western Melbourne)
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05
Employment
Profile
33

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5.1 Jobs by Industry
There are close to 90,000 employed residents in
Brimbank. The table shows jobs by industry in Brimbank
in 2019-20. A high level of employment typically
indicates an area of comparative advantage.
Manufacturing is Brimbank’s highest employing industry,
accounting for 16% of all jobs (14,732), followed by
transport, postal and warehousing with 11,836 jobs
(13%), construction with 11,126 jobs (12%) and health
care and social assistance with 10,728 (12%).
In terms of aggregate employment growth over the
past five years, construction (+3,128 jobs) experienced
the strongest growth, followed by transport, postal
and warehousing (+2,865) and health care and social
assistance (+2,185).
Professional, scientific and technical services registered
the largest proportional growth rate (+52%) over the
past five years, followed by public administration and
safety (+46%) and electricity, gas, water and waste
services (+44%).
Industry
2014-15
2019-20
Change
Growth
Manufacturing
12,742
14,732
+1,990
16%
Transport, Postal and Warehousing
8,971
11,836
+2,865
32%
Construction
7,997
11,126
+3,128
39%
Health Care and Social Assistance
8,543
10,728
+2,185
26%
Retail Trade
7,910
8,551
+640
8%
Education and Training
6,569
6,219
-350
-5%
Wholesale Trade
4,853
5,240
+386
8%
Public Administration and Safety
2,732
3,993
+1,261
46%
Accommodation and Food Services
3,912
3,760
-152
-4%
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services
2,031
3,089
+1,058
52%
Other Services*
2,792
2,870
+78
3%
Administrative and Support Services
2,293
2,806
+514
22%
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services
948
1,368
+420
44%
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services
868
880
+11
1%
Information Media and Telecommunications
619
778
+159
26%
Financial and Insurance Services
635
762
+127
20%
Arts and Recreation Services
631
577
-54
-9%
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing
213
198
-16
-8%
Mining
115
108
-8
-7%
Total industries
75,377
89,620
+14,243
19%
T1. Brimbank Employment by Industry 2015 to 2020
Source: National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) 2021
*Note Other Services includes industries such as automotive repairs, hairdressers and beauty services
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Labour force movements
Brimbank includes close to
90,000 local jobs
. Around
33%
of local jobs belong to local residents. Brimbank provides an
important source of labour to western and central Melbourne
businesses, with almost 34,000 employed residents
traveling to other parts of Melbourne for work.
• In the western region, these are key workers
4
across
industrial, retail and health related sectors
• In central Melbourne, there is a high level of out
commuting for ‘white collar’ workers (i.e. professional,
financial services) and key worker industries (i.e. retail,
hospitality, health care).
There is a high level of labour force movement across
industrial-related sectors in western Melbourne. This is
to be expected, given the presence of the Western SSIP
and the common labour force profile across these areas.
The notable number of workers traveling outside of the
municipality for work in health care and social assistance,
retail, hospitality and professional services presents
opportunities for Brimbank to increase job containment,
and re-direct these jobs locally – particularly in the future,
as the development of the Sunshine NEIC progresses.
F15. Unemployment Rate
Brimbank & Greater Melbourne
Source: Unemployment rate, Economy ID, 2021.
Employment Profile
4 An employee who provides a vital service, especially in essential services
of retail, health and education, VPA, 2020
5.2 Unemployment
Brimbank has a higher unemployment rate compared
with Greater Melbourne. This is a consistent long
term trend, partly attributed to higher levels of socio
economic disadvantage in some parts of the municipality.
This strategy seeks to reduce the unemployment rate
in Brimbank through improved employment pathways,
upskilling and job readiness.
14%
6% 4.9%
12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0%
Dec-18
Dec-19
Dec-20
Feb-19
Jun-19
Jun-20
Jun-21
Apr-19
Dec-18
Oct-19
Feb-20
Apr-20
Aug-20
Oct-20
Feb-21
Apr-21
Aug-21
Oct-21
Dec-21
Mar-22
Brimbank
Greater Melbourne
35

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5.3 Occupations
Brimbank’s labour force includes a broad mix
of occupations due to the diverse education
qualifications, skills and locational attributes
(proximity to employment areas).
There is a high representation of ‘blue collar’ workers,
reflected by the proportion of technicians and trade
workers, machinery operators and drivers, and labourers.
The share of workers classified as either managers
(11%) or professionals (17%) in Brimbank is lower than
Greater Melbourne.
Industry
Brimbank
Greater Melbourne
Managers
11%
14%
Professionals
17%
26%
Technicians and Trades Workers
14%
12%
Community and Personal Service Workers
9%
10%
Clerical and Administrative Workers
14%
14%
Sales Workers
10%
10%
Machinery Operators and Drivers
13%
6%
Labourers
11%
8%
Inadequately described or not stated
2%
2%
T2.
Labour Force Profile
Source: Occupation, Census of Population and Housing, ABS, 2016
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06
Strategic
Framework
37

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6.1 Priorities for the Strategy
Ten priorities for the Strategy emerged from research, analysis and stakeholder consultation. A summary of what we
heard and found for the ten priorities is summarised below. These have directly informed the strategic framework and
action plan.
Priority
What We Heard and Found
1. Economic Recovery
from the COVID-19
Pandemic
• Victoria is in an economic recovery phase, but economic conditions are fragile
• Population-service industries such as retail, hospitality, tourism and personal
services have been hit the hardest by the pandemic
• Business support and assistance will be important for economic recovery and
resilience. Assistance can be provided through regular and targeted engagement,
communication and promotion
• Grant opportunities and financial incentives that are available to businesses should
be promoted
• Industry specialisations should be strengthened to assist ongoing recovery
• Investment opportunities for emerging/growth sectors will encourage
diversification in the local economy.
2. Business Support
and Development
• 98% of Brimbank businesses are either non-employing, micro or small
• Engagement, communication, promotion, networking and training is important for
business sustainability and growth
• Engagement should be targeted, meaningful and insightful
• Business training, mentorship and networking encourages resilience and growth
• Helping people to start a business should be encouraged.
3. Investment
Attraction and
Facilitation
• Investment can take the form of infrastructure, land use, precinct and urban
renewal, as well as business/start-ups
• Investment attraction should be targeted through engagement, promotion and
facilitation
• An efficient and facilitative approach to assessing planning and development
applications should be investigated and encouraged
• Attracting investment in innovative business ideas, technology and entrepreneurial
activities is a major opportunity
• Investment and development of vacant and underutilised areas should be
investigated.
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Priority
What We Heard and Found
4. Skills, Training and
Job Readiness
• Key industries affected by labour shortages are construction, health care, social
assistance, manufacturing and hospitality
• Tertiary education institutions and industry can assist with addressing labour force
shortages and skills gaps
• Encourage people to be engaged and ready to work
• Employment pathways could be improved, particularly for unemployed and
disadvantaged cohorts
• Brimbank has a higher level of socio-economic disadvantage in some of the
southern and central suburbs. Narrowing the inequality gap should be encouraged
• Services that are available for people experiencing mental health issues should be
promoted to businesses.
5. Major Precinct
and Infrastructure
Development
• Substantial investment and development that is planned for Brimbank creates
opportunity for lasting positive economic impacts
• Industry opportunities will emerge on the back of progressive development/
redevelopment and intensification of the built form scale (e.g. Sunshine Priority
Precinct)
• Key growth industries include retail and hospitality, professional services, advanced
manufacturing, information media and telecommunications, health care and social
assistance and tourism
• Brimbank City Council should continue to work with key stakeholders to support the
economic and community vision for the municipality
• Council should continue to advocate on behalf of business, worker and resident
interests.
6. Activity Centres
• Brimbank’s Activity Centres are vibrant, dynamic and evolving precincts
• Place making programs and initiatives should continue to be encouraged to improve
the look, feel and access of centres
• The cultural diversity and heritage of centres should be enhanced where
appropriate
• Support buy/shop local and other promotional campaigns
• A mix of uses in Major and Metropolitan Activity Centres should be encouraged to
retain and enhance the vibrancy of these locations for businesses, and attract more
people to visit, stopover, dwell and spend
• Ensure smaller centres are protected and enhanced
• The priorities of Brimbank’s Activity Centre Strategy (2018) should continue to be
implemented.
7. Industrial Precincts
• Strategic industrial precincts should be retained and enhanced
• Opportunities for innovative and emerging industries/technologies to establish in
industrial precincts should be investigated and facilitated
• Older industrial precincts should be improved through amenity and access upgrades
• Continue to implement the priorities of Brimabank’s Industrial Land Use Strategy
(2018).
Strategic Framework
39

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Priority
What We Heard and Found
8. Climate Change,
The Circular
Economy and Green
Industries
• State Government’s renewable energy targets are driving investment into
renewable energy production, storage and transmission
• Brimbank’s Climate Emergency Plan targets zero net emissions for Council
operations by 2030, and the Brimbank municipality by 2040. This Plan should
continue to be supported
• Private sector investment in new technologies and business activity (e.g. convert
and re-use waste and other products) is a key opportunity
9. The Visitor
Economy
• Brimbank’s visitor economy currently performs a tertiary role
• The municipality is well-placed to attract more visitation, given that it is a central
hub of the growing western region and is highly accessible via road and rail
• The advantages of Brimbank as a place to visit is linked to its multi-cultural
community and social fabric, strong business base, retail and hospitality offering
• Major infrastructure and land use investment will create major opportunity for
growth in visitation
• Key visitor economy development opportunities include arts and culture (cultural
diversity, food and fibre history/heritage and public art), accommodation, and
festivals/events
• Tourism marketing and branding material could be improved
• Continue to promote Brimbank as the Centre of the West.
10. Strategic
Partnerships
• Economic development priorities and advocacy efforts at the local and regional level
should continue to be supported
• Participate in regional economic development organisations such as Lead West and
WoMEDA to support regional priorities
• Collaborating with regional stakeholders is important to discuss economic trends,
issues and opportunities.
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6.2 Themes & Strategic Goals
Four themes and strategic goals underpin the strategic framework, and are outlined below. The framework is informed
by the research and analysis detailed in the Background Report, as well as extensive consultation with business,
industry and government stakeholders.
Theme
Strategic Goal
A Productive,
Innovative and
Sustainable
Business Base
Brimbank is open for business.
The City will continue to support its business base to
ensure it is productive, innovative and sustainable.
The City will continue to attract new businesses to
grow and strengthen industry clusters and areas of
specialisation.
Vibrant,
Prosperous
and Accessible
Precincts and
Places
Brimbank’s precincts and places are fundamental to the
economic identity and character of the municipality.
The City will encourage investment and improvements
across its employment precincts and activity centres to
ensure they are vibrant, prosperous and accessible.
An Engaged
and Job Ready
Community
Brimbank’s people are at the heart of the City.
People will have the opportunity to learn and earn, and
the labour force will be engaged and prepared for work.
Leading the
Way in Economic
Development
Practice
Brimbank is a leader in economic development practice.
The City’s economic development practices will be
innovative, tailored and fit-for-purpose to achieve
positive economic outcomes for its people.
Strategic Framework
1 2 3 4
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6.3 Action & Implementation Plan
The Economic Development Strategy includes four key
themes, strategies and an action plan to support the
implementation of the Strategy over the next 5 years
(2022 to 2027).
This Strategy has been prepared in the context of the
municipal and state planning framework and broader
regional priorities in Western Melbourne. The Strategy
will be implemented in partnership with state and federal
agencies, local business and industry, business and
traders associations and the community where relevant.
The Action and Implementation Plan is subject to
Council's standard budget approval process. It is
highlighted that a significant number of actions can be
delivered within the operational budget allocated to
Departments, based on 2021/22 financial year. Some
actions will require the preparation of separate business
cases outside the operational budget process.
Where a separate business case is required, an indicative
cost estimate is provided using the following key:
• $ ($1,000 to $25,000)
• $$ (25,001 to $50,000)
• $$$ ($50,001 to $100,000)
• $$$$ (over $100,000).
An indicative timeframe, lead and partner stakeholders
are recommended for each action. Timeframes for
actions are categorised as follows:
• Short term (1 year)
• Medium term (2-3 years)
• Long term (3-5 years)
• Ongoing.
The implemen
tation of the Strategy will be regularly
monitored to ensure it remains relevant and responsive.
Learnings should be captured to improve future delivery
and decision making.
An annual progress report on the Strategy’s
implementation will be prepared. Additional information
sources that could be used to monitor progress, include:
• Participant feedback in business and community
workshops
• Feedback from business / traders associations and
group meetings
• Investment interest (i.e. enquiries, planning/building
permit activity)
• The release of Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)
Census of Population, Employment and Housing
• The Australian Business Register (ABR) data.
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Strategic Directions
• Business engagement, communication, promotion,
networking, mentorship and training will seek to
foster recovery, resilience, sustainability and growth
• Business engagement will be regular, targeted and
meaningful
• Communication with businesses will consider the
high prevalence of businesses who are owned
and managed by people who are Culturally and
Linguistically Diverse (CALD)
• Business support and assistance will be prioritised
in the early phases of the Strategy, particularly
for population-service industries such as retail,
hospitality, tourism and personal services, which were
heavily impacted by pandemic-related restrictions
• Industry specialisations will be strengthened by
promoting clustering and facilitating new businesses
to invest, and existing businesses to re-invest (e.g.
manufacturing, transport and logistics health care,
construction, retail, hospitality)
• Economic objectives that are envisaged for the
Sunshine Priority Precinct, NEIC and SHWEP will be
achieved by attracting and developing emerging,
innovative and high-value knowledge industries
(e.g. professional and financial services, advanced
manufacturing)
• Investment in new business entries will harness the
potential accumulation of latent demand for migrant
business visas
• The start-up ecosystem, entrepreneurial and
innovative investment and activities will be
encouraged in Brimbank
• Suitable and affordable business premises and
accommodation for micro and home-based businesses
to operate in will be supported
• Telecommunications and digital infrastructure should
seek to be improved through advocacy
• Seek to encourage business investment in green
and innovative technologies to support Brimbank’s
Climate Emergency Plan (2020-25), and encourage
improved energy recycling and waste processes across
industrial, business and community uses.
A Productive, Innovative &
Sustainable Business Base
Strategic Framework
Brimbank is open for business.
The City will continue to support its business base to ensure it is productive,
innovative and sustainable.
Brimbank will continue to attract new businesses to grow and strengthen industry
clusters and areas of specialisation.
Theme
1
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1
A Productive, Innovative & Sustainable Business Base
1. Support growth, resilience, and build up the capacity of the existing businesses.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
1.1
Develop a business engagement plan to ensure
engagement is regular, meaningful and targeted.
Ensure business engagement is contemporary and
digitised (where possible) to streamline and track
engagement activity.
Regularly engage and communicate with businesses to
deliver targeted and relevant business information
(e.g. Business Link).
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Media and Communications
Ongoing
1.2
Ensure engagement and communication embeds a
consideration of the high prevalence of Culturally and
Linguistically Diverse (CALD) persons who own and/or
operate a business.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Media and Communications
Ongoing
1.3
Facilitate a program of training, mentorship and
networking events/programs to encourage up
skilling, capacity building and businesses-to-business
opportunities.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Business training providers
(e.g. Business Victoria)
Ongoing
1.4
Promote grants, resources and other incentives
available for businesses through government
departments such as Business Victoria.
Lead:
Economic Development
Ongoing
1.5
Review business permit assessment processes,
and investigate the potential to streamline where
possible.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Partners, City Planning,
Environmental Health,
City Compliance, Customer
Service, Building
Ongoing
1.6
Maintain an online resource of Brimbank’s economic
and demographic profile to provide a single source of
information to existing and prospective businesses/
investors about key trends. Information should include
business, employment, industry and labour force
trends.
Lead:
Economic Development,
Community Strengthening
and Social Planning,
Place Managers
Ongoing
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A Productive, Innovative & Sustainable Business Base
1
Strategic Framework
2. Grow and support specialised, innovative, high-value and emerging industries to strengthen
economic drivers and supply-chains, and diversify the economy.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
2.1
Facilitate and encourage business investment/re
investment in industrial-related specialisations and
clusters such as manufacturing, transport, logistics
and wholesale trade.
Lead:
Economic Development
Ongoing
2.2
Facilitate and encourage new business investment
in high-value office-based sectors, particularly in
the Sunshine Priority Precinct.
Lead:
Economic Development,
Place Managers
Partners:
DoT
Medium to long term
2.3
Support programs and initiatives that encourage
the start-up ecosystem, innovation and
entrepreneurialism (e.g. the CUL-TI-VATE Initiative
and IGNITE Program).
Lead:
Economic Development
Ongoing
3. Ensure there is sufficient and adequate critical infrastructure for businesses to thrive.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
3.1
Advocate for improved telecommunications
and digital infrastructure to support business
operations (e.g. full coverage, lower latency, high
speeds).
Lead:
Asset and Property Services
Partners:
Economic Development
Short term
3.2
Encourage new co-working spaces to establish in
Brimbank.
Lead:
Economic Development
Ongoing
3.3
Continue to support entrepreneurs, freelancers,
micro, small and home-based businesses by
encouraging suitable accommodation (e.g.
incubators, co-working spaces), and support
programs such as hackathons and meet-ups.
Lead:
Economic Development
Ongoing
4. Foster a sustainable and environmentally conscious business community.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
4.1
Continue to support initiatives that encourage
business and industry to adopt environmentally
sustainable business practices. Examples include
take up of energy audits, solar energy and buying
renewable energy.
• Brimbank Community Solar
• Environmental Upgrade Agreement
• 100% Renewable Brimbank Program.
Lead:
Environment
Partners:
WAGA, Economic
Development
Ongoing
4.2
Encourage business investment in new, green and
innovative technologies in strategic locations to
help reduce waste and carbon footprint. Examples
include circular economy businesses such as
Waste-to-Energy (WTE) facilities.
Lead:
Environment
Partners:
WAGA,
Economic Development
Ongoing
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Theme
2
Vibrant, Prosperous and
Accessible Precincts and Places
Brimbank’s precincts and places are fundamental to the economic identity and
character of the municipality.
The City will encourage investment and improvements across its employment
precincts and activity centres to ensure they are vibrant, prosperous and accessible.
Strategic Directions
Priority Precinct, Major Activity Centres and
Areas Identified for Renewal
• Participation and involvement in planning for
Brimbank’s key activity areas and priority precincts
(e.g. Sunshine NEIC, Sunshine Metropolitan Activity
Centre, SHWEP) will seek to prioritise and optimise
local economic and community benefits
• Participation and involvement in planning for major
transport projects (e.g. Melbourne Airport Rail,
Sunshine Station Super Hub and Sunshine Priority
Precinct) will seek to prioritise and optimise local
economic and community benefits
• Local business and employment opportunities
associated with major precinct and infrastructure
investment/development will be promoted where
appropriate
• Seek to minimise disruptive impacts of major
infrastructure works on businesses through
communicating updates and information when made
available
• Encourage growth and development of Brimbank’s
visitor economy
• New and improved visitor attractions and services that
seek to leverage strengths, capitalise on opportunities
and address gaps will be supported (e.g. cultural
diversity, food and fibre history/heritage and public
art, visitor accommodation, and festivals/events).
Activity Centres
• Priorities for Brimbank’s network of activity centres
will be encouraged; as per the Activity Centre Strategy
(2018)
• Place making initiatives will seek to improve the look,
feel, function and access of centres, and encouraged
where appropriate
• The sense of place that underpins the role and
character of Activity Centres will be promoted and
enhanced where possible
• Buy/shop local and other promotional campaigns will
be supported
• A mix of uses in Activity Centres will be encouraged to
enhance the attractiveness and vibrancy for business,
residents and visitors.
Industrial Precincts
• Industrial land in the Western SSIP and sites identified
as ‘Industrial’ in the BILS (2018) that have good
separation from sensitive urban uses will be retained
and enhanced
• The transition of ‘Transitional and Employment’
sites identified in the BILS (2018) will continue to be
supported (subject to further strategic work)
• Investment in innovative and emerging industries
and technologies, and environmentally sustainable
industries will be encouraged
• Improvements to the amenity and accessibility of
industrial areas will be encouraged and facilitated
where possible
• The implementation of the Brooklyn Evolution
Program will continue to be supported.
Underutilised Precincts and Places
• Economic and community development opportunities
should be investigated for underutilised commercial
and industrial precincts
• Advocate for solutions that result in productive use of
land in the Green Wedge, located in the north west of
the municipality
• The potential to develop commercial and/or
community uses on vacant and underutilised land that
is considered surplus to Council and State Government
needs should be investigated.
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Strategic Framework
Vibrant, Prosperous and Accessible Precincts and Places
2
5. Actively participate in planning and development of Brimbank’s major redevelopment areas
to encourage economic and employment opportunities for the local economy and community.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
5.1
Engage, participate and work with planning authorities,
government bodies, landowners, investors, developers,
business and the community to support and progress
the planning and development of Brimbank’s major
redevelopment areas and priority precincts, particularly:
• Sunshine National Employment and Innovation Cluster
• Sunshine Priority Precinct
• Sunshine Metropolitan Activity Centre
• Sunshine Health Wellbeing and Education Precinct
• Major Activity Centres of Sydenham, St Albans,
Brimbank Central and Deer Park.
Lead:
Transforming Brimbank,
Strategic Planning, DoT
Partners:
Economic Development,
Place Managers, Urban
Design, Advocacy and
Partnerships, Community
Engagement, DJPR, Precinct
Anchors, Western Melbourne
Tourism
Ongoing
5.2
Continue to engage with organisations and precincts
located in, or adjacent to Brimbank that are of
metropolitan , regional, state and national significance to
facilitate appropriate growth and development.
Examples include Melbourne Airport, Western Health and
Victoria University.
Partners:
Transforming Brimbank,
Advocacy and Partnerships,
Community Engagement,
Strategic Planning, Economic
Development, Place Managers
Ongoing
5.3
Encourage high-value industries to establish within the
Sunshine NEIC that align with existing specialisations
and the state-significant designation. Recommendations
include:
• Professional and business services
• Advanced manufacturing (medical equipment,
devices and apparatus, biotechnology, construction
technologies, food and fibre)
• Information technology (data centres)
• Health care and social assistance (hospitals, medical
clinics and general practitioners, allied health services,
mental health services, aged care)
• Education, training and research.
Lead:
Economic development, DoT
Partners:
Place Managers, Western
Health, VU, Melbourne
University
Medium to long
term
5.4
Actively engage and participate in the State Government’s
delivery of major transport projects to optimise local
economic and community benefits. Transport projects
include:
• Melbourne Airport Rail Link (MAR)
• The Sunshine Station Superhub (SSH)
• Suburban Rail Loop (SRL)
• Western Rail Plan.
Lead:
Transforming Brimbank
Partners:
Strategic Planning,
Urban Design, Economic
Development, City Planning,
Engineering Services, State
Government Agencies
Ongoing
5.5
Promote and facilitate local business procurement and
employment opportunities for major infrastructure
projects (e.g. Victoria’s Big Build).
Lead:
Economic development
Medium to long
term
(continued)
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6. Maintain and strengthen the economic role, vibrancy and character of Brimbank’s Activity
Centres.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
6.1
C
ontinue to implement Brimbank’s Activity Centre
Strategy (2018). Consider updating the Strategy
to account for new activity centres, and economic
shocks and structural shifts caused by the COVID-19
pandemic as part of any future review.
Lead:
Economic Development, Strategic
Planning
Partners:
City Planning, Urban Design, Place
Managers, Engineering Services
Medium to long
term
Indicative Cost
$$$
6.2
Promote a mix of uses which are reflective of the
role and purpose of Activity Centres and their place
in the hierarchy.
Encourage a diversity of activities and services,
including retail and retail services, hospitality,
health, wellbeing and fitness services,
entertainment, community, civic and professional
services.
Lead:
Economic Development, Place
Managers
Partners:
Media and Communications, City
Planning, Strategic Planning
Ongoing
6.3
Continue to implement the Sunshine Rising Action
Plan (2019 - 2024) and the Go St Albans Action Plan
(2019 - 2024), including their review and update
when required.
Lead:
Economic Development, Place
Managers
Partners:
City Planning, Urban Design,
Engineering Services, Strategic
Planning
Short to medium
term
6.4
Encourage an update to the Watergardens Town
Centre Framework Plan & the Sydenham Regional
Activity Centre Structure Plan and associated
planning controls (in line with current aspirations
for the Centre) in order to maximise economic
opportunities for vacant and underutilised sites.
Lead:
Strategic Planning
Partners:
City Planning, Urban Design,
Engineering Services, Community
Strengthening and Social
Planning, Environment, Economic
Development, Watergardens
Shopping Centre, private
landowners, businesses
Long Term
Indicative Cost
$$$$
5. Actively participate in planning and development of Brimbank’s major redevelopment areas
to encourage economic and employment opportunities for the local economy and community.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
5.6
A
dvocate and work with DoT, RPV and contractors
where possible to minimise potential impacts/
disruptions to business associated with
infrastructure works by providing support in
accordance with the Victorian Small Business
Engagement Guidelines (SBEG).
Lead:
Transforming Brimbank,
Urban Design
Partners:
Place Managers, Economic
Development, Strategic
Planning, Engineering
Services
Ongoing
2
Vibrant, Prosperous and Accessible Precincts and Places
(continued)
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6. Maintain and strengthen the economic role, vibrancy and character of Brimbank’s Activity
Centres.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
6.5
Pr
epare a Structure Plan for the Deer Park Activity
Centre and surrounds.
Lead:
Strategic Planning
Partners:
City Planning, Urban Design,
Engineering Services, Community
Strengthening and Social
Planning, Environment, Economic
Development, private landowners,
businesses
Short Term
Indicative Cost
$$$
6.6
Support a program of activation, place making and
urban design initiatives across Activity Centres that
encourage and deliver an attractive environment
for residents, workers and visitors to visit, dwell and
spend, including improvements that relate to access,
safety and streetscape amenity and character.
Lead:
Urban Design
Partners:
Economic Development,
Community Strengthening and
Social Planning, Place Managers,
Arts and Culture
Ongoing
6.7
Facilitate the marketing and promotion of Activity
Centres sense of place; with a focus on Sunshine
and St Albans, which have marketing and
promotional special rates.
Lead:
Place Managers
Partners:
Economic Development, Arts and
Culture
Medium to long
term
6.8
Continue to encourage digital and social media
resources that encourage local residents and visitors
to explore Brimbank.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Place Managers, Media and
Communications, local businesses,
Business/Traders Associations
Ongoing
6.9
Continue to proactively administer the Marketing
and Promotional Special Rate Programs to ensure
expenditure accords with the purpose of the
schemes. Undertake a review and renewal to
support business and traders associations to deliver
business development and marketing/promotional
initiatives in Sunshine and St Albans.
Lead:
Place Managers
Partners:
Business Support, Governance,
Sunshine Business Association,
St Albans Traders Association
Ongoing
6.10
Consider completing a business audit in Activity
Centres with traditional retail/commercial strips to:
• Monitor change to tenancy mix over time;
• Identify gaps and opportunities that could be
promoted; and
• Inform any potential review and update to the
Activity Centre Strategy (2018).
The initial f
ocus should be the Centres of Sunshine,
St Albans, Keilor, Deer Park and Glengala.
Lead:
Economic Development,
Place Managers
Medium term
Strategic Framework
Vibrant, Prosperous and Accessible Precincts and Places
2
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7. Protect and enhance industrial precincts in the Western SSIP
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
7.1
Retain land identified as industrial in BILS (2018),
particularly those areas with good separation from, and
contain a limited number of sensitive uses.
Encourage improved amenity outcomes in industrial
areas, in line with the Brimbank Industrial Design
Guidelines, and facilitate access and safety
improvements.
Lead:
City Planning, Strategic
Planning, Urban Design and
Engineering Services
Partners:
Economic Development, local
businesses, landowners.
Ongoing
7.2
Promote the local, regional and state significance of
industrial precincts in Brimbank.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Strategic Planning, DJPR, local
businesses
Ongoing
8. Encourage the evolution of industrial precincts to attract and establish viable and
sustainable industries
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
8.1
Continue to implement the Brooklyn Evolution Program,
including the long-term transition away from high
amenity impact uses (e.g. landfills) at the end of their
lifecycle to lower amenity impact uses such as light
industry, warehousing, smaller factory, commercial and
large-format retail uses.
The Precinct should also support innovative and
emerging industries and technologies, and provide
opportunities for environmentally sustainable industries
that apply best practice technology, and extend beyond
exclusively materials recycling.
Partners:
City Planning, Economic
Development, Urban Design,
Environment, Engineering
Services
Ongoing
Indicative Cost
$$$$
8.2
Where strategic work demonstrates it is appropriate,
continue to support the transition of industrial areas
identified as 'transitional' and 'employment' in the BILS
(2018) to suitable and viable alternative uses.
Lead:
Strategic Planning
Partners:
Economic Development
Ongoing
8.3
Promote Government grants and information related
to soil remediation and treatment as they arise
(e.g. Soil Remediation Grant, DELWP).
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Strategic Planning, City
Planning, Environment, State
Government Agencies
Short to medium
term
2
Vibrant, Prosperous and Accessible Precincts and Places
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9. Support the productive use of vacant and underutilised land
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
9.1
Consider opportunities to develop commercial
and/or community uses on vacant and
underutilised land that is appropriately
located and is demonstrated to be surplus to
Council needs.
Lead:
Asset and Property Services
Partners:
City Planning, Strategic Planning,
Leisure and Community Facilities,
Economic Development
Ongoing
9.2
Engage with landowners of vacant or
underutilised industrial zoned land in order to
facilitate investment and development outcomes.
Lead:
Strategic Planning
Partners:
Economic Development, landowners
Long Term
9.3
Encourage State Government Agencies and other
research institutions (e.g. CSIRO) to investigate
the feasibility of productive use of Green Wedge
Zoned (GWZ) land in the north west of the
municipality.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Strategic Planning, State Government
Agencies, research institutions
Medium to long
term
10. Grow the visitor economy through product and destination development, and through
promotion of precincts, places and spaces.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
10.1
Upda
te and refresh Brimbank’s Visitor Economy
Strategy (2018) to:
• Reflect Sunshine’s designation as a Priority
Precinct
• Investigate opportunities from significant
transport investment like MAR
• Consider the implications of COVID-19.
Prioritise pr
ojects (or ideas) that invest in
identified gaps/opportunities for products
and services for visitor markets such as VFR,
business/corporate, health and education,
leisure/entertainment/recreation (metropolitan
catchment).
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Place Managers, Media and
Communications, Urban Design,
Strategic Planning, Transforming
Brimbank
Short term
10.2
Continue to promote Brimbank’s art and cultural
attractions, spaces and festivals/events through
various channels, including Creative Brimbank and
Experience Brimbank website.
Lead:
Arts and Culture
Partners:
Economic Development, Media and
Communications, Place Managers,
Business/Traders Associations,
Historical Associations
Ongoing
10.3
Promote growth in the night-time economy in
locations where existing businesses are well
suited to night-time trading/servicing such as
Sunshine, St Albans and Sydenham.
Lead:
Economic Development, Place
Managers
Partners:
Community Strengthening and
Planning, Urban Design.
Ongoing
Strategic Framework
Vibrant, Prosperous and Accessible Precincts and Places
2
51

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Strategic Directions
• A higher level of participation in the local labour force
will be encouraged to lower rates of unemployment
• Labour force shortages, skills gaps, and improving local
employment pathways will seek to be addressed in
partnership with tertiary education institutions and
industry. Programs and initiatives should be targeted
and collaborative
• Programs and initiatives should be prioritised
for key industries affected by labour shortages
(e.g. construction, health care, social assistance,
manufacturing, hospitality)
• Seek to encourage labour force preparedness to
combat structural changes (current and future)
threatening unskilled and low skilled jobs (e.g.
increased automation of routine, manual processes)
• Upskilling and re-skilling of the labour force should
be encouraged
• Seek to encourage industry to provide an inclusive
working environment to support potential
employees with a disability
• Local procurement programs, policy and opportunities
should be promoted
• Seek to encourage higher levels of job retention.
• Support strategies and actions detailed in the Local
Jobs for Local People Strategy (2021)
• Communication with businesses should consider
the high prevalence of businesses who are owned
and managed by people who are Culturally and
Linguistically Diverse (CALD)
• Seek to promote Brimbank as a place to live, work and
visit through targeted promotional campaigns
• Seek to narrow the inequality gap, and encourage a
reduction in the level of socio-economic disadvantage.
An Engaged & Job Ready Community
Brimbank’s people are at the heart of the City. People will have the opportunity to learn
and earn, and the labour force will be engaged and prepared for work.
Theme
3
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11. Increase local participation in the workforce through preparedness and pathways, upskilling
and re-skilling.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
11.1
Continue to implement actions in the Local Jobs for
Local People Program (2021) relevant to improving
employment pathways and encouraging a job ready
workforce.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Community Learning and
Participation, local employment
agencies, education providers,
VU, DJPR
Ongoing
11.2
Encourage re-skilling and preparedness in the
labour force to combat structural changes that
are threatening unskilled and low skilled job types
(e.g. increased automation of routine/manual
processes).
Lead:
Community Learning and
Participation, Economic
Development
Partners:
Local employment agencies,
education providers, VU, DJPR
Ongoing
11.3
Continue to support employment related Council
programs and initiatives targeting job readiness,
engagement and retention.
Focus on reducing the level of disadvantage and
inequality in Brimbank.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Future Connect, Local
Employment Agencies
Ongoing
11.4
Continue to support programs and initiatives
delivered by employment and learning services,
including Brimbank Learning Futures, Youth
Services and the Future Connect Local Learning
Network.
Lead:
Community Learning and
Participation, Economic
Development
Partners:
Community Wellbeing, Future
Connect, Youth Services
Ongoing
11.5
Support an update to Brimbank’s Youth Jobs
Strategy and Lifelong Learning Strategy.
Lead:
Community Learning and
Participation, Economic
Development
Short term
11.6
Seek to improve communication and engagement
between local businesses and the CALD
community/workforce, with greater emphasis on
non-english speakers.
Lead:
Community Learning and
Participation, Economic
Development
Partners:
Media and Communications
Ongoing
11.7
Promote mental health services to businesses,
employees and job seekers through the appopriate
channels (e.g. E-bulletin, JobLink and Learning
Futures)
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Community
Wellbeing, mental health
providers
Ongoing
11.8
Promote to industry available government support
and services to facilitate the employment of people
with a disability.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Relevent service
providers
Ongoing
Strategic Framework
An Engaged & Job Ready Community
3
53

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12. Address skills gaps and labour force shortages.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
12.1
C
ontinue to implement actions in the Local Jobs for
Local People Strategy (2021) relevant to skills gaps
and labour force shortages.
Lead:
Economic Development,
Community Learning and
Participation
Partners:
Local employment agencies,
Future Connect, education
providers, VU, DJPR
Ongoing
12.2
Engage with key sectors affected by labour
shortages such as health care, social assistance,
manufacturing and hospitality.
In
vestigate activities to address labour shortages
across these sectors.
Lead:
Economic Development,
Community Learning and
Participation
Partners:
Local employment agencies,
Future Connect, education
providers, VU, DJPR
Short term
12.3
Partner with tertiary education institutions (such as
Victoria University) and industry to formulate and
implement a targeted approach to local labour force
shortages and skills gaps (e.g. VU Skills Hub and
Construction Futures Training Facility).
Lead:
Economic Development,
Community Learning and
Participation
Partners:
VU, TAFE sector, other
tertiary institutions, industry
associations
Short term
12.4
Support the potential to establish a VU Rise (Centre
of Excellence) in the Sunshine NEIC.
Lead:
VU P
artners:
Transforming Brimbank,
Community Learning and
Participation, Strategic
Planning, Economic
Development
Long term
3
An Engaged & Job Ready Community
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Strategic Directions
Economic Development Practice and Resource
• Economic development resources within
Council should be fit-for-purpose, agile and
adequately resourced
• Seek to encourage innovative and efficient economic
development processes through:
• Communicating and promoting information via
online portals
• Making data available via an Application
Programming Interface (API)
• Business engagement through digital
platforms such as Client/Customer Relationship
Manager (CRM)
• Investigating streamlined application assessment
processes where possible.
Investment Attraction and Facilitation
• Investment opportunities for the development/
occupation of a specific site(s) or precinct in-line with
the zone or vision for that area will be facilitated by
liaising and advocating with landowners, institutional
investors and developers
• An efficient and facilitative process to assessing
planning and development applications should
be encouraged
• Infrastructure and services (physical and soft)
enhancements should be investigated to
support new and existing SMEs, and encourage
the start-up ecosystem in Brimbank and
Western Melbourne
• Investment initiatives and opportunities should be
advocated through investment prospectus, advisory
groups and strategic partnerships.
Business Engagement and Support
• External resources, tools and programs should
be promoted to assist business recovery,
development and growth (e.g. grant programs,
business development)
• Business engagement and communication should be
regular, targeted and meaningful
• Business engagement will consider the high
prevalence of non-English speakers who operate a
business (e.g. CALD).
Strategic Partnerships and Advocacy
• Investment and industry advocacy and
advisory groups are effective, and should
continue to be supported
• Economic development priorities across
Brimbank should be promoted at the local,
regional and state level
• Seek to engage and participate in regional
economic development organisations such as
Lead West, Western Melbourne Tourism and
WoMEDA support advocacy, promotion and
partnerships
• Seek to encourage and apply best practice approaches
to regional issues where possible.
Strategic Framework
Leading the Way in Economic
Development Practice
Brimbank is a leader in economic development practice. The City’s economic
development practices will be innovative, tailored and fit-for-purpose to
achieve positive economic and social outcomes for its people.
Theme
4
55

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13. Embed economic development practice across Council, and adopt a best practice approach.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
13.1
Undertake a service review to ensure sufficient capacity
and resource allocation to deliver economic development
priorities, including ensuring clearly defined roles and
responsibilities.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Customer Experience
and Corporate
Performance, Business
Support, People &
Performance
Medium to long term
Indicative Cost
$$
13.2
Enc
ourage the ongoing implementation of smart city
technology to deliver efficiencies in economic development
practice, and assist decision making.
Lead:
Economic Development,
Assets and Property
Services
Ongoing
13.3
Attend industry events and forums for knowledge sharing,
networking and promoting Brimbank’s interests (e.g.
Economic Development Australia, Mainstreet Australia,
Western Melbourne Tourism, Victorian Tourism Industry
Council).
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Place Managers,
Transforming Brimbank
Ongoing
14. Support local and regional economic development priorities, programs and initiatives.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
14.1
R
epresent Brimbank’s interests in regional economic forums
and regional economic strategies. Collaborate with regional
bodies such as Lead West, Western Melbourne Tourism
and WoMEDA on strategic priorities such as investment
attraction, infrastructure delivery, workforce development
and precinct development.
Lead:
Economic Development,
Place Managers,
Transforming Brimbank
Partners:
Lead West, WoMEDA,
Western Melbourne
Tourism.
Ongoing
14.2
Consider establishing a municipal-wide Economic and
Employment Advisory/Reference Group, consisting of
business and industry leaders to discuss current issues and
opportunities relevant to economic, industry and business
development, support and growth.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners
:
Local business and
industry leaders
Short Term
14.3
Continue to support Council advisory committees such as the
Sunshine and St Albans Partnership Groups.
Lead:
Place Managers
Ongoing
4
Leading the Way in Economic Development Practice
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Brimbank City Council | Economic Development Strategy 2022-2027

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15. Target and facilitate investment in land use, business and infrastructure to deliver economic
and community benefits.
Action
Lead & Partners
Timeframe
15.1
Embed an investment facilitation framework
protocol to ensure a consistent and coordinated
approach across Council Departments.
Continue to refine and implement the Investment
Facilitation Framework.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
City Planning, Strategic Planning,
Urban Design, Engineering
Services
Short term
15.2
Publish Council's investment attraction brochure to
inform businesses of Council's investment process.
Lead:
Economic Development
Ongoing
15.3
Maintain an up-to-date Brimbank Investment
Prospectus that can be used as collateral to target
investment.
Lead:
Economic Development, Media
and Communications
Ongoing
15.4
Advocate and promote investment initiatives and
opportunities through investment prospectus,
advocacy and advisory groups, and strategic
partnerships.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Place Managers, Transforming
Brimbank, Strategic Planning,
Advocacy, Partnerships and
Community Engagement, State
Government Agencies
Ongoing
15.5
Identify, attract and liaise with landowners,
institutional investors and developers to facilitate
targeted investment opportunities that relate to
the development/occupation of a specific site(s) or
precincts.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Place Managers, Transforming
Brimbank, Strategic Planning,
Advocacy, Partnerships and
Community Engagement, State
Government Agencies
Ongoing
15.6
Investigate infrastructure and service (physical
and soft) needs to support new and existing SMEs
and the start-up ecosystem in the municipality and
Western Melbourne.
Lead:
Economic Development
Partners:
Engineering Services
Short term
Indicative Cost
$
Strategic Framework
Leading the Way in Economic Development Practice
4
57

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6.4 Targets and Monitoring
The implementation of the Strategy should be regularly
monitored and evaluated. High-level indicators and
measures are provided under each theme and are in-line
with Economic Development Australia’s (EDA) Evaluation
and Measurement Toolkit. Each target proposes an
indicator to monitor to track progress at choice intervals.
Learnings should also be captured to improve future
delivery and decision making.
An annual progress report on the Strategy’s
implementation should be considered. Additional
information sources that could be used to track progress,
include:
• Participant feedback in business and community
workshops
• Business / traders Associations and group meetings
• Feedback from business and industry through
engagement, surveys and other correspondence
• Council’s open data program and internal information
sources
• ABS Census of Population and Housing, Employment
and other releases (e.g. business counts)
• Australian Business Register data.
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Brimbank City Council | Economic Development Strategy 2022-2027

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Theme
Measure
Monitor & Indicator
Frequency
A Productive,
Innovative
and
Sustainable
Business
Base
Maintain/increase business
engagement and communication.
Engagement activity via the following:
• CRM • Survey respondents
• E-bulletins
• Social media/website traffic.
Bi-annually
and per survey
/ E-bulletin
release
An increase in land use investment/
re-investment in the Sunshine
NEIC.
Building and planning enquiries,
applications and issued permits.
Annually
Business and employment growth
in office-based sectors.
• The Australia Business Register
(ABR)
• Business Counts (entries/exits),
ABS Census of Employment.
Annually
An increase in the number of
participants attending/participating
in start-up and entrepreneurial
programs/initiatives/events.
Attendance Numbers
Per program /
initiative
An increase in members at
i-Harvest.
Membership numbers.
Annually
Maintain/increase the level of
participation and attendance at
training, networking and mentoring
events and forums.
Attendance numbers.
Per event
Strategic Framework
1
59

image
Theme
Measure
Monitor & Indicator
Frequency
Vibrant,
Prosperous
and
Accessible
Precincts and
Places
Business and employment growth
in professional services, advanced
manufacturing, transport and
logistics, information technology,
health care, education and training.
• Growth and share of local jobs across
target industries, ABS Census of
Employment
• The Australia Business Register
(ABR)
• Business Counts (entries/exits),
ABS Census of Employment.
Annually and
four-yearly
(Census)
Delivery of a program of public
realm investment across activity
centres.
Brimbank City Council’s capital works
program.
Annually
An increase in visitation to
Brimbank major and metropolitan
Activity Centres.
• Feedback from business and traders
associations
• Feedback from Centre managers
(e.g. Watergardens).
Bi-Annually
A decrease in vacancy rates across
a representative sample of activity
centres.
• Activity centre audit/monitoring
program (representative sample)
• Feedback from business and traders
associations
• Feedback from Centre managers
(e.g. Watergardens)
• Feedback from local agents.
Anually
Increase in visitation and visitation
for leisure purposes to Brimbank.
• Visitation and purpose of visit,
National Visitor Survey, Tourism
Research Australia
• Feedback from Western Melbourne
Tourism.
Annually
Maintain or increase the number of
festivals/events held in Brimbank,
and the level of attendance.
The number of event permits issued.
Annually
2
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Theme
Measure
Monitor & Indicator
Frequency
An Engaged
and Job Ready
Community
A decrease in the unemployment
rate, and an increase in the
employment participation rate in
areas with higher unemployment.
Unemployment and employment
participation rate, ABS Census of
Employment.
Quarterly and
annually
A decrease in labour shortages
and skills gaps in target industries
(hospitality, manufacturing,
transport and logistics,
construction, health care and
education).
• Growth and share of local jobs across
target industries, ABS Census of
Employment
• Feedback from tertiary education
providers
• Feedback from business and traders
associations
• Feedback from local businesses.
Annually and
four-yearly
(Census)
An increase in the utilisation of
Brimbank’s Learning Futures.
Enquiries, visitation and room-hire
utilisation
Bi-Annually
Improve socio-economic
circumstances in the community,
particularly in southern and central
districts.
• SEIFA Score, ABS Census of
Population and Housing
• Unemployment and employment
participation rate, ABS Census of
Employment.
Bi-Annually
(unemployment),
Four-yearly
(Census)
Leading
the Way in
Economic
Development
Practice
An increase in investment
enquiries and business entries
for target industries (professional
services, health and education,
retail, accommodation and food
services, advanced manufacturing,
information technology).
• The number of investment enquiries
• Website traffic/visitation to Council’s
‘Investing in Brimbank’ webpage
• Business Counts (entries/exits), ABS
Census of Employment.
Annually
An increase in land use investment
for residential, commercial office
and mixed use development in the
Sunshine NEIC.
• The number of investment enquiries
and planning/building applications
• Website traffic/visitation to Council’s
‘Investing in Brimbank’ webpage.
Annually
Maintain or reduce the median
number of days taken between the
receipt of a planning application
and a decision.
Benchmark against adjoining
municipalities.
Statutory Planning Performance
Summary, Know Your Council.
Annually
Maintain attendance and
involvement with industry events
and forums for staff working in the
economic development unit.
• The number of attendees and
frequency of attendance.
Per Event/
Forum
3
4
61

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07
Appendix
62

image
Stakeholder
Attendees
Format
Brimbank Business
Reference Group
Sebastian Agricola (President, St Albans Business Association), Ken
Matthews (Director, Matthews Steer Accountants), Craig Miller (General
Manager, JBS), Peter Fowler (General Manager, Bell Industries), Rhys
Quick (Director, Urbis), Jayne Richardson (Construction Delivery Partner,
Vicinity Centres), Trish Gardiner (Centre Manager, QIC Watergardens),
Leanne Deans (City Strategy Manager, BCC), Peter Forbes (Economic
Development Coordinator, BCC)
Workshop
Brimbank
COVID-19
Business Recovery
Taskforce
Warren Roberts (Interim CEO, BCC), Sebastian Agricola (President,
St Albans Business Association), Daniel Dalli (President, Brimbank
Business Association), Emma Stott (General Manager, Overnewton
Castle), Ken Matthews (Director, Matthews Steer Accountants), Kelvin
Walsh (Director City Development, BCC), Leanne Deans (City Strategy
Manager, BCC), Peter Forbes (Economic Development Coordinator, BCC)
Round table
Brimbank City
Council Councillors
(3 sessions)
Cr Jasmine Nguyen (Mayor), Cr Thuy Dang, Cr Sarah Branton, Cr Maria
Kerr, Cr Bruce Lancashire, Cr Trung Luu, Cr Ranka Rasic, Cr Victoria Borg
Cr Virginia Tachos, Cr Jae Papalia, & Cr Sam David.
Workshop &
briefings
Brimbank City
Council Executive
Management
Team
Warren Roberts (Interim CEO), Kelvin Walsh (Director City Development),
Dan Hogan (Director, Advocacy, Partnerships and Community
Engagement), Lynley Dumble (Director Community Wellbeing), Shane
Marr (Director, Financial and Organisational Excellence), Neil Whiteside
(Director, Infrastructure and City Services).
Workshop
Brimbank City
Council Planning,
City Strategy
+ Community
Officers
Aiden Mullen (Executive Manager of the Transforming Brimbank),
Leanne Deans (Manager City Strategy), Kristen Gilbert (Manager City
Planning), Peter Forbes (Coordinator Economic Development), Christine
McAllister (Manager Community Learning and Participation), Robert
Shatford (Coordinator City Planning), Sophie Thompson (Coordinator
Strategic Planning), Philip Phan (Senior Economic Development Officer),
Raju Mazumdar (Principal Strategic Planner), Meyvan Hettige (Senior
Economic Development Officer), Cinzia Crea (St Albans Place Manager),
Rachel Bernardo (Sunshine Place Manager)
Workshop
Department of
Jobs, Precinct and
Regions (DJPR)
Michael Edmonds (Director North and West Metro), Marc Amos (Senior
Investment Manager, West Metro),
Vittoria Mancini (Investment Specialist, West Metro), John Trakas
(Investment Specialist, West Metro).
Workshop
Department of
Transport (DoT)
Will Bakes (Transport Precincts, Sunshine), Susan Price (Precinct
Delivery Manager, Sunshine)
Meeting
Lead West
Sue La Greca (Executive Officer)
Meeting
Pelligra
Ross Pelligra (Chair)
Meeting
Australian Unity
Peter Beale (Senior Asset Manager)
Meeting
Overnewton Castle
Emma Stott (General Manager)
Meeting
JBS
Craig Miller (General Manager)
Meeting
Stakeholder Summary
Appendix
63

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9249 4000
Email
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Post
PO Box 70, Sunshine, VIC 3020
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