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Annual Budget
2023/2024

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Contents
Mayor’s Introduction
2
Budget Reports
Budget influences
3
1. Link to the Council Plan
6
2. Services and service performance indicators
8
3. Financial statements
24
4. Notes to the financial statements
34
5. Financial Performance Indicators
53
6 Fees and charges schedule
55
Appendices
A Capital works details
78
B Road Rehabilitation Program
83

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Mayor’s Introduction
Mayor’s Message – Annual Budget 2023/24
Together with my fellow Brimbank Councillors, I am pleased to introduce Brimbank’s Annual Budget for 2023/2024.
The budget provides a blueprint for the delivery of essential services, programs and infrastructure that plays a critical role in
achieving a beautiful, healthy, sustainable, liveable and connected Brimbank.
Our budget planning for 2023/2024 continues to reflect Council’s commitment to operate in a financially sustainable and
responsible way, all while operating in a rate-capped environment.
Over the last year, Council has consulted extensively with our community on a wide range of topics. This budget has been
shaped by the thoughts and ideas shared during Council’s extensive community consultation which included online and face-to
face engagement opportunities.
Many community members gave feedback by ranking six Council priorities:
• Wellbeing and belonging
• Pride and participation
• Liveable and connected
• Sustainable and green
• Growing and transforming
• Earning and learning
The top ranked priority was “Sustainable and green – protect natural environments for current and future generations”.
This includes initiatives that respond to climate emergency and protecting our natural environment for current and future
generations. Other top priorities for the year ahead are infrastructure improvements and investment in key capital works, and
community wellbeing.
The Annual Budget 2023/2024 provides a description of the services and initiatives that will be funded in the next financial year
and will help contribute to achieving the Council vision, ‘a transformed Brimbank that is beautiful, thriving, healthy and
connected’.
We are also highly focused on advocating for State and Federal government support and the investment the community needs
to build a stronger future for Brimbank.
Over the last three years, we have successfully advocated for State and Federal investments for our community which has lifted
our capacity to deliver major programs and infrastructure improvements within our municipality.
This Annual Budget includes a significant capital works allocation of $55.9 million to deliver essential infrastructure projects,
services and facilities across our city, including:
* Sports facility upgrades and enhancements - $12.0 million including Lloyd Reserve - Soccer/Cricket pavilion upgrade,
Lionheart Reserve Tennis Pavilion Upgrade, Green Gully Reserve - Tennis pavilion upgrade, JR Parsons Recreation Reserve
tennis pavilion upgrade, and a New JR Parsons Football/Cricket Pavilion
* Road improvements, footpath replacement and repairs and kerbside replacements – $25.0 million
* Playgrounds, parks and gardens - $6.3 million including suburban and local parks upgrades.
* Improvements to community facilities - $2.2 million including Robertson's Homestead Restoration, and Deer Park Library
redevelopment
* Traffic management - $1.4 million including safety improvements at various locations across Brimbank
* Drainage rehabilitation - $1.1 million
* Town centre improvements - $830,000
* Sustainability projects - $500,000 including Land Rehabilitation at Sunshine Energy Park, and Carrington Drive Reserve, and
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction program across various Council buildings and assets
The Annual Budget also includes a range of key initiatives that will support community health and wellbeing and contribute to
the overall liveability of our city.
These vital programs will help us continue to build a strong and resilient community.
Cr Bruce Lancashire
Brimbank Mayor
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Snapshot of Brimbank City Council
Population
Transforming Brimbank
Climate Change
Social Justice
The Transforming Brimbank program aims to leverage this investment to deliver meaningful and generational change for
our community. Brimbank aims to do this by working closely with key stakeholders as well as the community, to ensure that
all investment will invest in people and place and not just projects.
Climate change is an immediate, real, and all-encompassing threat. An appropriate science-based, coordinated public
policy response is the only responsible course of action. Council’s declaration of a climate emergency is a bold but
necessary action that sees ‘socially just’ climate action as a necessity, to be undertaken at scale and speed.
In Brimbank, health, equity, energy, infrastructure, the natural environment, and the material economy are the core areas
that will be affected by climate change, and by the responsive transition to the new economy.
Brimbank’s social, economic and cultural diversity means it needs to prioritise the needs of many different cultures and
lifestyles in the community and address any areas of disadvantage.
Council recognises the need to address the many complex issues that arise due to the impacts of systemic disadvantage
and therefore has formed many multi-agency partnerships to support our work.
There is a strong acceptance of cultural diversity by Brimbank’s residents. Faith and religion factor strongly in the lives of
many, with seven out of 10 residents indicating a religious affiliation. The changing migration patterns have led to increases
in residents who affiliate with non-Christian religions.
The population of Melbourne’s Western Metropolitan Region is growing rapidly, with Brimbank positioned to be at the very
heart of its future expansion. While the Western Metropolitan Region currently has a population of approximately 964,000,
by 2051 this is projected to rise to 1.75 million most of which will occur in the growth areas directly to the west and north of
Brimbank.
The challenges of shifting demographics, government policy and service model reforms, ensuring social equity and access
in a constrained fiscal environment are transforming the way in which services and infrastructure are funded and delivered
to meet future needs.
Brimbank and Melbourne’s West is about to see billions of dollars of development and infrastructure being delivered over
the coming decades in a way that will transform our city. The majority of investment and transformational change is planned
to occur on the Sunshine Precinct, which may have up to 43,000 additional residents and an additional 29,000 jobs created
by 2051.
Budget influences
The Budget is influenced by a range of factors, including the following:
• demographic profile, population needs and trends
• use and development of land
• the state of the local economy
• Federal and State policy and legislative requirements
Brimbank is a vibrant, growing community in the heart of Melbourne’s west, that borders the Hobsons Bay, Maribyrnong,
Melton, Moonee Valley and Wyndham municipalities. Located between 12 and 23 kilometres west and north-west of the
Melbourne CBD and covers an area of 123 square kilometres.
The migrant community in Brimbank is strong and the municipality prides itself on its cultural diversity, which is ingrained in
its history. From European beginnings, it is now the western region gateway for migrants from all over the world. More than
160 nationalities are represented, and over half of the residents speak a language other than English.
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Mental Health and Wellbeing
Cultural Diversity
• •
• •
Due to supply issues and shortages in materials, capital works costs have increased from 5% to 15% over baseline
(FY2023 to FY2032 budget) . This has increased the average annual spend from $3 million (5% uplift) to $8.8 million
(15% uplift).
Impact of Climate Emergency is contributing to increased costs for many Council services. One example is the Parks
Service, where prolonged Spring seasons result in greater vegetation growth and more frequent and severe storm
events increase maintenance costs.
Borrowing Rates:
The cost of borrowings are forecast to be significantly impacted by future interest rate increases. The current loan
balance as at 30 June 2022 is $91m, where the majority of the balance is locked in at historically low rates of less than
2%. The projected 10 year Treasury Corporation of Victoria Bond Rate June 2023 is expected to reach 3.85%.
Community Expectation:
The increase in community expectations relating to the use of technology and access to Council services online.
Brimbank prides itself on its cultural diversity, embracing more than 160 nationalities from around the globe.
Brimbank has a rich indigenous history, going back to when the Wurundjeri people first inhabited the region, thriving in the
Maribyrnong Valley. The land has a human history that began with Aboriginal traditional custodians, the Kulin Nation, more
than 40,000 years before European settlement. The area was originally occupied by the KurungJang-Balluk and Marin
Balluk clans of the native Wurundjeri people.
Diversity is central to our identity – we are proudly multicultural, embracing people from around the world and weaving their
stories into our own.
Shifting demographics, changes to Government policy, service model reforms, and ensuring social equity and access in a
constrained financial environment, are creating pressure on the way services and infrastructure are funded and delivered.
External influences
Each year, one in five Victorians will experience a mental health condition. Certain population groups are at higher risk of
poor mental health and mental illness because of greater vulnerability to unfavourable social, economic and environmental
circumstances, including social isolation and loneliness. COVID-19 has also impacted residents' mental health and
wellbeing, particularly those affected by unemployment or with limited access to income support. Prolonged periods of
isolation, restricted activity and limited social connection have damaged mental health and wellbeing of many people.
Brimbank Council adopted its first Mental Wellbeing Plan in 2022 in which we recognise our unique role as advocate,
enabler and facilitator for improved programs and services to support mental wellbeing. The vast majority of Council’s
services, community facilities and programs contribute in some way to help improve mental wellbeing. Council will continue
to develop ways to evaluate the collective impact on positive mental wellbeing.
Global influences:
Climate Change:
Legislative changes have and will continue to have an impact on the operating costs for many Council services, such as
Parks Services compliance with 'Code of Practice for Electric Line Clearance 2020' having a $250,000 impact on service
cost, and increased compliance relating to traffic management planning accreditation and provision having a $250,000
impact on service cost.
As funding from the Federal and State Governments either lessens or remains the same, the 'gap' between the true cost
of running Council services and the level of subsidy continues to grow. Grant revenue as a proportion of total revenue is
budgeted to decrease from a forecast position of 14.36% in 2022/2023 to 10.65% in 2023/2024.
Cost Shifting:
The Fire Services Property Levy is a State Government levy, which is collected by Council on behalf of the State
Government.
The preparation of the Annual Budget 2023/2024 has been influenced by the following external factors:
Rate Base:
The Victorian State Government introduced a cap on rate increases from 2016/17. The cap for 2023/24 has been set at
3.5%.
The landfill levy payable to the State Government upon disposal of waste into landfill has increased from $6.29 million in
FY2022/2023 to $7.44 million in FY2023/2024, and is included in Council's waste management budget.
The Federal Budget delivered in 2021 announced increases in the Superannuation guarantee percentage for the
2021/22 financial year, moving the rate from 9.5% to 10.0%, and a further 0.5% increase, each financial year, until the
rate reaches 12.0% in the 2025/26 financial year. These Superannuation guarantee percentage increases have been
factored into the Annual Budget 2023/24, and outer year figures.
Melbourne Metropolitan CPI is forecast to be 4.0% for 2023/2024, meaning that underlying costs of services are
increasing more than our income base from rates.
State Government:
Legislative Changes:
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• • •
• • •
• •
• • •
Improving community access to Council.
Budget Considerations
Budget guidelines were set and prepared based on internal influences and budget principles. These include:
Ongoing objective to gain operational efficiencies and to achieve long term financial sustainability
Internal influences
As well as external influences, there are also a number of internal influences which are expected to have a significant
impact on the preparation of the Annual Budget 2023/24. These matters have arisen from events occurring in the 2022/23
year resulting in variances between the actual and budgeted results for that year and matters expected to arise in the
2023/24 year. These matters and their financial impact are set out below:
Grants were based on anticipated funding levels
Council is committed to continually reviewing services and programs to ensure they meet the needs of our community.
This includes a planned program of service reviews.
New revenue sources were identified where possible
Employee costs include; on-costs such as superannuation, long service leave, annual leave and work cover, enterprise
agreement and performance increments
The effect of rate capping on growth in council rates, in place since financial year 2016/17, has a material impact on
council’s ability to raise revenue and has had a significant cumulative impact on its rates base – estimated at $126m for
the 2023/24 financial year. This rate capped environment has meant Council has had to look for efficiencies to enable us
to continue delivery of services during this time. As identifying efficiencies becomes more difficult, Council then needs to
consider they type and method of services delivered, into the future
An indication of future year’s capital works program for the next 10 years based on Council strategic objectives.
With improvements to systems already creating efficiencies, further improvements are being considered by
impliementing contemporary systems as an enabler for enhancing productivity and customer service.
Operating expenditure such as administration/program, printing and stationery, materials etc. budgets used a principle of
targets based on prior year budget plus indexation, whereby each department's operational expenditure is reviewed
comprehensively and material variances from the target budget had to be justified rather than assume automatic
increases
An increasing demand from the community to address ageing infrastructure, improve the appearance of town centres
and enhance parks, playgrounds and sporting facilities
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1. Linkage to the Council Plan
1.1 Legislative planning and accountability framework
1.1.1 Key planning considerations
Service level planning
Community consultation needs to be in line with a councils adopted Community Engagement Policy and Public Transparency Policy.
This section describes how the Budget links to the achievement of the Community Vision and Council Plan within an overall integrated strategic
planning and reporting framework; as prescribed in the
Local Government Act 2020 (The Act)
. This framework guides the Council in identifying
community needs and aspirations over the long term (Community Vision and Financial Plan), medium term (Council Plan, Workforce Plan, and
Revenue and Rating Plan) and short term (Budget) and then holding itself accountable (Annual Report).
The Budget is a rolling four-year plan that outlines the financial and non-financial resources that Council requires to achieve the strategic
objectives described in the Council Plan. The diagram below depicts the integrated strategic planning and reporting framework that applies to
local government in Victoria. At each stage of the integrated strategic planning and reporting framework there are opportunities for community
and stakeholder input. This is important to ensure transparency and accountability to both residents and ratepayers.
Source: Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions
The timing of each component of the integrated strategic planning and reporting framework is critical to the successful achievement of the
planned outcomes.
Although councils have a legal obligation to provide some services— such as animal management, local roads, food safety and statutory
planning—most council services are not legally mandated, including some services closely associated with councils, such as libraries, building
permits and sporting facilities. Further, over time, the needs and expectations of communities can change. Therefore councils need to have
robust processes for service planning and review to ensure all services continue to provide value for money and are in line with community
expectations. In doing so, councils should engage with communities to determine how to prioritise resources and balance service provision
against other responsibilities such as asset maintenance and capital works.
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1.2 Our purpose
Our vision
Our purpose
Our values
• • • •
• • • • • •
Fund and Resource
1.3 Strategic Directions
1.
People and
Community
Wellbeing and Belonging - Responsive services that support mental and
physical wellbeing
Pride and Participation - Community and cultural connections built through
social and artistic expression
2.
Place and Spaces
Liveable and Connected - Inviting and liveable spaces and facilities,
connected so people can get around
Sustainable and Green - Protect natural environments for current
and future generations
3.
Opportunity and
Prosperity
Growing
and
Transforming
-
Optimise
community
opportunities
through
infrastructure
innovation and investment
Earning
and
Learning
-
Everyone
has
access
to
education,
training
and
lifelong
learning
to
support their aspirations
4.
Leadership and
Governance
Engaged and Responsive - Community insights are valued to enhance
connection and engagement with Council
High Performing and Accountable - Our workforce strive to enhance services and
liveability for the Brimbank community
The Council Plan 2021-2025 sets out four goals or Strategic Directions that will enable the Vision to be delivered. Strategic objectives are
identified for each of the Strategic Directions that determine what Council is aiming for. Annual actions are determined in accordance with the
Annual Budget.
Strategic Directions
Strategic Objectives
We find
BETTER WAYS
We are
RESPECTFUL
Our
Roles
and
Functions
Lead and Represent
Partner and Advocate
Provide Services
Build and Maintain
Plan and Regulate
The organisation’s values guide our behaviour and underpin everything we do. Our values help us achieve the organisation’s vision and improve
the quality of the services we offer to our community. Our values are:
Council's vision -
"By 2040, the Brimbank community will be healthy and safe and we will be united through a sense of belonging and pride. Our
city will be inclusive, resilient, innovative and vibrant and our people will share equally in the City's prosperity and opportunity. The environment
will be protected and enhanced and Brimbank’s diverse neighbourhoods and housing will offer something for everyone."
Council's purpose -
"A transformed Brimbank that is beautiful, thriving, healthy and connected."
We act with
INTEGRITY
We work
TOGETHER
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2. Services and service performance indicators
• •
2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Expenditure
751
854
702
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
751
854
702
Expenditure
1,822
1,675
1,357
(Revenue)
(25)
(15)
(20)
Net Cost
1,796
1,661
1,337
Expenditure
983
1,443
1,481
(Revenue)
(264)
(235)
(329)
Net Cost
719
1,208
1,152
Source: Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions
2.1 Strategic Direction: People and Community
Wellbeing and Belonging - Responsive services that support mental and physical wellbeing
Pride and Participation - Community and cultural connections built through social and artistic expression
Description of services provided
Service Access
This section provides a description of the services and initiatives to be funded in the Annual Budget for the 2023/24 year and how
these will contribute to achieving the strategic objectives outlined in the Council Plan. It also describes several initiatives and service
performance outcome indicators for key areas of Council’s operations. Council is required by legislation to identify major initiatives and
service performance outcome indicators in the Budget and report against them in its Annual Report to support transparency and
accountability. The relationship between these accountability requirements in the Council Plan, the Budget and the Annual Report is
shown below.
The following services and initiatives are funded in the Annual Budget and will contribute to the achievement of Council's strategic
objectives.
The strategic directions include a number of services, major initiatives and service performance indicators which are outlined in the
Council Plan and set out below.
The Annual Budget is part of and prepared in conjunction with the Community Vision that influences the Council Plan. The relationship
between the strategic objectives of the Annual Budget and the Council Plan, along with the link to the Annual Report, is shown in the
diagram below.
The Food Services (aka Delivered Meals) aims to support, maintain and enhance the physical, social and emotional well-being of
clients. Delivered meals are prepared and delivered to the clients (home or centre-based). Council volunteers deliver the meals.
Service Access provides a single and centralised service access and assessment point for community care services and service
information to the community
Sub-services include Maternal & Child Health appointment bookings / Service Outreach and Navigation programs / Resilience and
Emergency Management / Community Register Regional Assessment Service for Commonwealth Home Support Programme
(CHSP) and Home and Community Care for Young People (HACC PYP).
Community Care
Community Care manages and coordinates all Council’s programs that support older people, people with disability and carers to
maintain their wellbeing and live at home independently with assistance.
Food Services
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2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Expenditure
452
375
385
(Revenue)
(103)
(59)
(32)
Net Cost
349
315
352
Expenditure
3,272
3,357
3,555
(Revenue)
(17)
(117)
(122)
Net Cost
3,255
3,240
3,434
Expenditure
367
527
472
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
368
528
472
Expenditure
239
40
50
(Revenue)
(130)
(14)
(32)
Net Cost
110
27
18
Expenditure
17
40
77
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
18
41
77
Expenditure
4,647
5,653
6,107
(Revenue)
(48)
0
0
Net Cost
4,600
5,654
6,107
Expenditure
1,165
1,235
1,603
(Revenue)
(4)
0
0
Net Cost
1,162
1,236
1,603
Expenditure
1,118
1,114
1,318
(Revenue)
(81)
(2)
(3)
Net Cost
1,039
1,113
1,315
Description of services provided
Property Maintenance
The Property Maintenance service provides minor home modifications and repairs to eligible clients of the Commonwealth Home
Support Program (CHSP) and Home and Community Care (HACC) Program for Young people (PYP) to maintain a safe, secure,
healthy home environment.
Social Support
The Support for Carers program is funded by the State Government to provide support for carer health and wellbeing.
Seniors Support
To provide support to people with a disability, seniors and carers living in Brimbank through the provision of information, advocacy,
advice, activities and events.
To support Council’s planning for these areas with an emphasis on access and inclusion, and to analyse and advise on current and
emerging issues.
Maternal and Child Health
Social Support Groups provide a range of activities and provides an opportunity for clients to attend and participate in social
interactions which are conducted away from the client’s home and in, or from, a fixed base facility or community based settings and
culturally specific programs.
Community Transport
Council provides a community transport service for people who are transport disadvantaged and are unable to travel on public
transport due to age, disability, health, social or geographic isolation or economic circumstances. The majority of clients using the
service are older people and people with disabilities. The service is individually tailored and provided as a door-to-door transport
service on a group or individual basis.
Support for Carers Program
Youth Services work to enhance the wellbeing of young people by providing a range of primary prevention to early intervention
services, using a youth and community development lens, to support positive participation in the community. Youth Services also
advocates, in partnership with young people, to ensure young people’s ideas and voices are heard around priority areas of need
and concern.
The Universal M&CH Service provides Key Age and Stage (KAS) consultations, flexible services, group sessions, other community
strengthening activities and telephone consultations.
The Enhanced Maternal and Child Health (EMCH) Service supports families who are experiencing significant risk issues and/or
present with multiple risk factors with potential for a significant impact upon the health and wellbeing of children within these
families.
Early Years Services
Early Years Community Programs supports families in their early childhood journey to access early year’s programs through service
delivery, sector co-ordination and community partnerships. We provide a range of community-based early education and support
programs for children aged 0 - school age and their primary carers.
Youth Services
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2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Expenditure
2,396
2,501
2,689
(Revenue)
(135)
(208)
(165)
Net Cost
2,263
2,294
2,524
Expenditure
4,748
11,155
13,362
(Revenue)
(2,281)
(8,251)
(12,266)
Net Cost
2,468
2,905
1,096
Expenditure
1,051
882
927
(Revenue)
(168)
(299)
(313)
Net Cost
884
584
614
Expenditure
318
427
462
(Revenue)
(294)
(504)
(517)
Net Cost
25
(76)
(56)
Expenditure
848
773
1,423
(Revenue)
(323)
(336)
(1,473)
Net Cost
526
438
(50)
Description of services provided
Arts and Culture
The Arts and Culture Unit working under the identifier of Creative Brimbank aims to build a vibrant, connected and creative
community, bringing together a wide range of creative opportunities for the community and artists of the west. The Unit supports
artists’ development, connects the community and artists in creative programs and activities, and manages spaces in which creative
activity takes place including the St Albans Community Centre (STACC) and Bowery Theatre plus the Council's various galleries
and exhibition spaces.
Leisure Centres
Council manages the Keilor Basketball and Netball Stadium. The facility offers a range of recreational and competitive sporting
options which offer all members of the Brimbank community the opportunity for participation in physical activity and a safe place for
social interaction.
Keilor Golf Course
Keilor Public Golf Course facilities include 18-hole golf course, a 20-bay driving range, pro shop, club and cart hire, and a kiosk.
In the past Keilor Public Golf Course has been maintained by Council but management by an external management company
(Belgravia Leisure). In September 2022, Council decided that it would operate both the management and maintenance in house
from 1 June 2023. Council officers are in the process of transitioning management. Details of in house model still being determined
at this point in time so will need to be confirmed in the future.
Golf Course Management, Operations, Pro Shop, Driving Range, Bookings, Coaching and Programs will be managed by Leisure
and Community Facilities. The maintenance of the Course will continue to be managed by the Brimbank Parks Team.
Brimbank Leisure Centres provide a range of health and fitness programs and services to improve the health and wellbeing of
community members across Brimbank. Programs and services include gymnasiums and group fitness classes for exercise, learn to
swim classes, recreational swimming and aquatic exercise.
Sport and Recreation
Sport and Recreation delivers a range of projects, programs and events and supports sporting and recreation clubs in capacity
building, business planning and funding applications.
Keilor Basketball/Netball
Stadium
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2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Expenditure
778
1,202
1,225
(Revenue)
(55)
(254)
(262)
Net Cost
724
949
963
Expenditure
1,074
809
950
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
1,074
809
950
Expenditure
1,544
1,582
1,593
(Revenue)
(14)
0
0
Net Cost
1,531
1,583
1,593
Expenditure
1,026
1,158
1,168
(Revenue)
(16)
(45)
0
Net Cost
1,012
1,114
1,168
Expenditure
1,351
1,353
1,453
(Revenue)
(803)
(925)
(923)
Net Cost
549
428
530
Description of services provided
Leisure and Community
Facilities
With a focus on equity, social justice and human rights outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and Culturally
and Linguistically Diverse communities (CALD), the Connected Communities Unit works to build community capacity, increase
participation and drive reconciliation across Brimbank and in our organisation. To support this work, the unit delivers Council's
community grants program and leadership and governance training programs for the Brimbank community.
Social Planning and
Research
Through social research and evidence-based planning, policy and partnerships, the Social Planning and Research Unit enables
Council to make strategic decisions and undertake interventions that will achieve social and health equity for our community. Driven
by the Municipal Health and Wellbeing Plan (part of Together We Are Brimbank) and Brimbank's Social Justice Charter, the unit
oversees whole of organisation approaches to community health and wellbeing.
Leisure and Community Facilities Planning has both operational and strategic units. Community Facilities manages bookings at
Council’s halls and meeting rooms, supports and develops community groups and manages tenancy agreements for community
facilities leases and licences. The strategic unit develops plans, policies and strategies that set the strategic direction for the
development and use of council facilities and programs.
Strengthening Communities
Working through a human rights lens, the Strengthening Communities Unit works to influence, engage, inform and create inclusion
and access opportunities across key life stages, situations and abilities. Through strong partnerships and collaborations the Unit is
able to effectively plan and coordinate evidence based programs and services.
Connected Communities
Building Compliance
Building Compliance provides administration and enforcement of key parts of the Building Act and Building Regulations within its
municipal district and externally where appointed on a commercial basis for ratepayers and customers.
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2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Expenditure
1,758
1,829
2,165
(Revenue)
(1,014)
(1,313)
(1,473)
Net Cost
745
518
692
Strategic Direction: People and Community - Net Total
25,971
27,724
26,591
Service Performance Outcome Indicators
The following indicators outlines how we intend to measure achievement of service themes.
Indicator
Utilisation
Health and safety
Environmental Health
Environmental Health implements legislated immunisations and food safety programs through education, advice, service provision
and enforcement to ensure a safe and high standard of public health is maintained across Brimbank.
Initiatives
• Work with partners to implement actions from the Mental Wellbeing Plan, with a focus on primary prevention.
Description of services provided
o Promote opportunities for local businesses to engage in disability awareness education
o Support the participation of people with disability in Council’s employment and work experience programs.
• Finalise the Brimbank LGBTQIA+ Action Plan 2023-2027, and commence implementation of actions.
• Continue to install standard and feature lighting as part of public amenity in activity centres to improve perceptions of safety and add
to urban amenity.
• Finalise and commence implementation of the updated Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan in collaboration with Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Peoples.
• Provide and promote a broad range of opportunities for the community to engage with diverse art forms.
• Engage with registered housing associations (community housing providers) to identify opportunities to increase supply of social and
affordable housing.
• As part of the Brimbank Disability Action Plan 2022-2026:
Services
Performance Measure
Computation
Maternal and Child Health
Participation
Participation in the MCH service
(percentage of children enrolled
who participate in the MCH
service)
[Number of children who attend
the MCH service at least once
(in the year) / Number of
children enrolled in the MCH
service] x 100
Participation in the MCH service
by Aboriginal children
(percentage of Aboriginal children
enrolled who participate in the
MCH service)
[Number
of
Aboriginal
children
who
attend
the
MCH
service
at
least
once
(in
the
year)
/
Number
of
Aboriginal
children
enrolled
in
the
MCH
service]
x
100
Aquatic Facilities
Utilisation of aquatic facilities
(number of visits to aquatic
facilities per head of municipal
population)
Number of visits to aquatic
facilities / Municipal population
Animal Management
Animal management
prosecutions
(number of
successful animal management
prosecutions)
Number of successful animal
management prosecutions
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Indicator
Health and safety
• •
2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000) ($'000)
Sustainability
Expenditure
2,403
1,788
2,043
(Revenue)
(4)
(22)
(10)
Net Cost
2,398
1,766
2,033
Conservation
Expenditure
1,975
2,041
2,219
(Revenue)
(27)
0
(84)
Net Cost
1,948
2,041
2,135
Expenditure
321
258
548
(Revenue)
(259)
(257)
(431)
Net Cost
62
(0)
117
Expenditure
689
836
730
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
689
835
730
Expenditure
3,087
3,189
3,316
(Revenue)
(7,446)
(4,994) (5,568)
Net Cost
(4,358)
(1,805) (2,252)
Services
Performance Measure
Computation
Food Safety
Critical and major non
compliance notifications
(percentage of critical and major
non-compliance outcome
notifications that are followed up
by Council)
[Number of critical non
compliance notifications and
major non-compliance
notifications about a food
premises followed up / Number
of critical non-compliance
notifications and major non
compliance notifications about
food premises] x 100
The primary role of the Conservation unit is to protect and enhance biodiversity across the municipality.
Western Alliance for
Greenhouse Action (WAGA)
Western Alliance Greenhouse Action (WAGA) councils work collaboratively to respond to climate change across the region and
encourage their communities – residents and businesses – to make a transition to a low carbon society. WAGA’s plans and projects
focus on both mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and adaptation to the impacts of climate change.
Contaminated Land
2.2 Strategic Direction: Places and Spaces
Liveable and Connected - Inviting and liveable spaces and facilities, connected so people can get around
Sustainable and Green - Protect natural environments for current and future generations
Description of services provided
The Sustainability Service Unit develops and coordinates Council's policies, strategies, programs and projects with a key focus on
climate change mitigation and adaptation, integrated water management, water sensitive urban design, the circular economy and
sustainability education.
The Contaminated Land service coordinates consultants, contractors and resources to deliver works programs and projects to
manage contaminated and Potentially Contaminated Land (PCL) to meet Council's statutory responsibilities.
Statutory Planning
Statutory Planning undertakes Council's statutory role of processing planning and subdivision applications in accordance with the
requirements of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 and the Subdivision Act 1988 and providing advice and guidance on these
matters. This involves a wide range of applications including multi-unit developments, heritage, liquor licenses, native vegetation
removal, industrial and commercial land use and development, reduction of car parking requirements, signage, flood-prone land,
contaminated land and subdivision.
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2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Expenditure
499
634
642
(Revenue)
(114)
(91)
(93)
Net Cost
385
543
549
Expenditure
1,831
1,815
1,981
(Revenue)
(699)
(772)
(768)
Net Cost
1,133
1,043
1,213
Expenditure
382
442
594
(Revenue)
(607)
(662)
(730)
Net Cost
(225)
(220)
(138)
Expenditure
2,757
3,063
3,257
(Revenue)
(2,097)
(4,636)
(4,700)
Net Cost
659
(1,573)
(1,443)
Expenditure
1,716
1,842
2,023
(Revenue)
(39)
0
0
Net Cost
1,677
1,842
2,022
Expenditure
6,180
5,889
5,969
(Revenue)
(580)
(796)
(735)
Net Cost
5,600
5,093
5,233
Expenditure
499
562
581
(Revenue)
(200)
(184)
(261)
Net Cost
299
377
319
Expenditure
902
730
607
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
902
730
606
Planning Compliance is responsible for enforcing compliance with the Brimbank Planning Scheme and planning permits. The team
work both proactively and reactively to bring land use and development into compliance. This may involve issuing Planning
Infringement Notices (PINs) or undertaking legal proceedings against offenders through VCAT or the Magistrates Court. The team
also provides advice to the Statutory Planners on appropriate and enforceable conditions for planning permits and oversees the
implementation of Construction Environmental Management Plans for development sites.
Animal Management
Animal Management Services provide education, enforcement and animal welfare services under state and local government
legislation.
Local Laws
Description of services provided
Planning Compliance
School Crossings
Provision of School Crossing Services during morning and afternoon school crossing times to ensure student and pedestrian safety
and also Optimise traffic movement.
Engineering Services
Local Laws provides enforcement and compliance activities across Brimbank, under state and Local Government Legislation in the
areas of Local Laws, Animal Management, Parking and Litter.
Event Compliance
Event Compliance undertake the provision of Local Law Permits for Public Events and other activities subject to event guidelines
under the relevant codes of practice and legislation, including permits to film within the municipality.
Asset Management Services provides enterprise infrastructure asset management services as they relate to local government.
Engineering services manages Council’s Capital Works Program and is responsible for planning, design, construction, maintenance
and renewal/disposal of local roads, drainage systems and other vital infrastructure in addition to transport planning.
Spatial Information Services
(GIS)
Spatial Information Services provides data, analytics, and mapping services in the areas of social, economic, spatial, demographic,
geographic, and environment.
Asset Management Services
(AMIS)
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2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Expenditure
437
454
470
(Revenue)
(1,228)
(969)
(1,045)
Net Cost
(792)
(514)
(576)
Expenditure
2,519
2,364
2,522
(Revenue)
(190)
(40)
(100)
Net Cost
2,328
2,324
2,421
Expenditure
642
663
736
(Revenue)
(16)
(112)
(80)
Net Cost
626
551
655
Expenditure
507
472
544
(Revenue)
(96)
(144)
(144)
Net Cost
411
328
399
Expenditure
10,447
10,832
11,379
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
10,447
10,832
11,378
Expenditure
4,669
4,667
4,869
(Revenue)
(285)
0
0
Net Cost
4,384
4,667
4,868
Expenditure
4,961
5,135
5,280
(Revenue)
(79)
0
0
Net Cost
4,881
5,135
5,279
Expenditure
7,641
6,190
11,121
(Revenue)
(275)
(145)
(146)
Net Cost
7,366
6,045
10,975
Description of services provided
Property Management
Property Management provide enterprise support and management of property related matters including management of leases,
licenses, tenant partners / tenants, asset sales, property acquisitions, boundary disputes, and illegal encroachments.
Rail Projects
Transforming Brimbank facilitates communication between Council and Rail Projects Victoria (RPV). This function is fully funded by
RPV.
Building Maintenance
Building Maintenance is responsible for the maintenance and essential service of Council owned buildings, including public toilets,
BBQ's, security services, fire services and graffiti removal.
Urban design
Urban Design delivers quality public realm outcomes within streets and activity centres that support community togetherness, active
transport and traders. The services works to create a green, resilient urban environment that supports the health and wellbeing of
the community while addressing climate change impacts and other shocks like pandemics.
Open Space
The Open Space Design team deliver quality public realm outcomes within parks and reserves that support community
togetherness and foster an active community while creating a green, resilient urban environment that supports the health and
wellbeing of the community that addresses climate change impacts and other shocks like pandemics.
Cleansing Services work to improve the amenity and liveability of Brimbank by maintaining the overall cleanliness of the
municipality.
Parks Services
Parks Services is responsible for maintaining the amenity and appearance of parks, open space, reserves, sporting fields, golf
course, streetscapes and road side assets. This assists in creating an urban environment that supports the health and wellbeing of
the community.
Road Maintenance
Road Maintenance are responsible for the maintenance of Council's Road and Drainage Network and associated infrastructure as
per Council's Road Management Plan.
Cleansing Services
Page 15

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2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Expenditure
2,790
3,525
3,776
(Revenue)
(51)
(40)
0
Net Cost
2,738
3,485
3,775
Expenditure
21,137
21,889
24,468
(Revenue)
(16)
0
0
Net Cost
21,121
21,889
24,467
Expenditure
1,304
1,670
1,719
(Revenue)
(44)
(51)
(42)
Net Cost
1,260
1,620
1,676
Expenditure
810
783
823
(Revenue)
(62)
0
0
Net Cost
749
783
822
Expenditure
(1,801)
(2,553)
(1,823)
(Revenue)
(171)
(185)
(250)
Net Cost
(1,971)
(2,738)
(2,074)
Expenditure
2,870
2,452
2,727
(Revenue)
(24)
0
0
Net Cost
2,846
2,452
2,726
Strategic Direction: Places and Spaces - Net Total
67,565
67,529
77,915
Description of services provided
Pedestrian Facilities
Operations Pedestrian Facilities is responsible for the maintenance, upkeep and safety of the entire footpath network in Brimbank.
Operations Group
Management
Operations Group Management is responsible for the overall coordination, administration, planning and monitoring of all services
within the Operations department.
Tree Services
Tree Services provides maintenance and ongoing care for Council's street tree and open space tree assets and follow standards
and requirements as set out in the Brimbank Tree Policy 2021.
Waste Services
Waste Services is responsible for the development of effective waste and resource management strategies and waste disposal and
recycling services across Brimbank.
Fleet Management
(Procurement and Leasing)
Fleet Management is responsible for annual maintenance schedule, budget and capital works program for Council’s passenger and
light commercial vehicles and plant and machinery.
Fleet Maintenance
Fleet Maintenance is responsible for the maintenance and servicing of the entire Council fleet and plant items.
Page 16

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Service Performance Outcome Indicators
The following indicators outlines how we intend to measure achievement of service themes.
Indicator
Statutory Planning
Decision making
Initiatives
• Further implement the Brimbank Climate Emergency Plan 2020-2025:
o Electrify Keilor Community Hub and West Sunshine Community Centre
o Deliver the Solar PV (panels) on Sports Pavilions Program
• Continue activating informal Youth ‘Pop up’ spaces that meet the informal health and wellbeing needs of young people.
• Implement the Brimbank Sports Facility Development Plan (2018) facility improvements, including:
o Lionheart Reserve New Tennis Pavilion
o Lloyd Reserve New Sports Pavilion
o Sportsground Reconstruction at Ardeer Reserve
o Design J.R. Parsons Reserve Multisport Pavilion
o Explore options for renewable energy for local business.
• Continue implementation of the Brimbank Cycling and Walking Strategy to provide a network that supports active transport.
• Further implement the Brimbank Urban Forest Strategy 2016-2046:
o Plant street trees in Kings Park, Deer Park and St Albans and approximately 20,000 tube stock plants
o Continue the Nature Places program to highlight importance of remnant grasslands at Bon Thomas Reserve
Roads
Satisfaction
Satisfaction with
sealed local
roads
(community satisfaction
rating out of 100 with how Council
has performed on the condition of
sealed local roads)
Community satisfaction rating
out of 100 with how Council
has performed on the condition
of sealed local roads
Waste Collection
Waste diversion
Kerbside collection waste
diverted from landfill (percentage
of garbage, recyclables and green
organics collected from kerbside
bins that is diverted from landfill)
[Weight of recyclables and
green organics collected from
kerbside bins / Weight of
garbage, recyclables and green
organics collected from
kerbside bins] x 100
o Design J.R. Parsons Reserve Tennis Pavilion
o Sports ground lighting upgrades at Sassella Tennis courts 5&6 and Selwyn tennis courts 1-6
o Upgrade cricket nets at Selwyn Reserve.
• Work with the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) and Police to develop and implement compliance initiatives that respond to
illegal waste dumping. This includes increased and improved surveillance mechanisms.
Services
Performance Measure
Computation
Council planning decisions
upheld at VCAT
(percentage of
planning application decisions
subject to review by VCAT and
that were not set aside)
[Number of VCAT decisions
that did not set aside Council's
decision in relation to a
planning application / Number
of VCAT decisions in relation to
planning applications] x 100
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• •
2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Expenditure
7,608
8,096
8,293
(Revenue)
(87)
(235)
(144)
Net Cost
7,521
7,861
8,149
Expenditure
2,110
2,483
2,693
(Revenue)
(127)
(341)
(344)
Net Cost
1,983
2,143
2,349
Expenditure
625
728
459
(Revenue)
(46)
(171)
(153)
Net Cost
579
557
306
Expenditure
1,591
1,435
1,660
(Revenue)
(290)
(321)
(380)
Net Cost
1,301
1,114
1,280
Expenditure
609
455
463
(Revenue)
(5)
0
0
Net Cost
604
455
463
Expenditure
1,429
1,762
1,699
(Revenue)
(3)
0
0
Net Cost
1,426
1,762
1,699
Expenditure
438
860
676
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
438
860
676
Expenditure
929
1,232
351
(Revenue)
(558)
(130)
(130)
Net Cost
371
1,102
221
Strategic Direction: Opportunity and Prosperity - Net Total
14,222
15,854
15,142
Description of services provided
Libraries
Brimbank Libraries provide a universal and inclusive service open to all community members at no charge. Libraries support the
learning needs and interests of the local community, residents, visitors, workers and students across all life stages.
Neighbourhood Houses
2.3 Strategic Direction: Opportunity and Prosperity
Growing and Transforming - Optimise community opportunities through infrastructure innovation and investment
Earning and Learning - Everyone has access to education, training and lifelong learning to support their aspirations
Economic Development promotes sustainable economic development and employment outcomes that benefit Brimbank through
building business capacity, establishing relationships and partnerships, and attracting and facilitating investment.
Place Management
Delivery of a program to coordinate revitalisation and place management of the St Albans and Sunshine Town Centres.
Strategic Planning
Council’s six Neighbourhood Houses (NH/CC) provide community strengthening activities and programs that meet the needs and
aspirations of local communities with a focus on learning and belonging. They bring people together to connect, learn, create and
contribute in their local community.
Learning and Employment
Pathways
Learning and Employment Pathways as well as Libraries and Neighbourhood houses work with individuals and groups in the
community to co-design initiatives that contribute towards better education, employment and social outcomes while encouraging
lifelong learning.
Economic Development
Facilities and Major Projects are responsible for the delivery of Council’s Facilities Asset Management Plan and Major Projects
including the ongoing maintenance of Council’s Facilities and Buildings.
Strategic Planning undertakes planning and prepares strategies to guide sustainable land use and development that
accommodates current and future community needs, while appropriately protecting the environment, heritage and a range of other
assets.
Transforming Brimbank
The key purpose of Transforming Brimbank is to leverage new investment in Brimbank to deliver meaningful and generational
change for the community. The program works to promote, partner and advocate for outcomes described in the Sunshine Priority
Precinct 2050 Vision.
Major Projects
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Service Performance Outcome Indicators
The following indicators outlines how we intend to measure achievement of service themes.
Indicator
Participation
• •
2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000) ($'000)
Occupational Health and Safety
Expenditure
1,124
756
786
(Revenue)
(248)
0
0
Net Cost
876
756
786
Employee Services
Expenditure
2,278
2,539
2,704
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
2,278
2,539
2,704
Initiatives
• Continue to monitor and respond to the proposed growth and development of Melbourne Airport, including the proposed third runway
development.
• Update Council’s Experience Brimbank Visitor Strategy to identify priorities, actions and resources for the next five years to promote
Brimbank as a destination and promote growth of the visitor economy and tourism.
o Establishment of an Economic and Employment Committee.
• Offer practical workplace experience to young people through a structured Placement Program, including opportunities for entry level
employment in Neighbourhood Houses and introductions to local business and employer networks.
• Support the development of new Kindergartens and Early Learning Centres in Brimbank.
• Plan and deliver digital literacy programs and services to support digital inclusion for vulnerable groups and individuals.
• Further implement the Brimbank Library Strategy 2020-2025 and Strategic Framework for Library Collections 2020-2025:
o Increase library customer self-service options
• Continue to promote Brimbank as a business location and facilitate development to deliver investment and economic uplift.
• Implement Year Two actions of the Brimbank Economic Development Strategy 2022-2027, including:
o Business communication and networking activities
o Industry and Business Development
Library Services
Active library members
(percentage of the municipal
population that are active library
members)
Library collection item loans
Number of library collection items
purchased in the last 5 years
Number of visits to the library
[Number of active library
members / Municipal
population] x 100
Number of items loaned during
the reporting period
Number of library items
purchased in the last 5 years.
Number of visits during the
reporting period.
2.4 Strategic Direction: Leadership and Governance
Engaged and Responsive - Community insights are valued to enhance connection and engagement with Council
High Performing and Accountable - Our workforce strive to enhance services and liveability for the Brimbank community
o Continue to build and promote culturally safe collections and services in consultation with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait
o Support opportunities for the community to learn and connect with new, emerging and creative technologies to improve
Services
Performance Measure
Computation
Description of services provided
The Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) service is a strategic partner and change facilitator that provides systems and technical
expertise on health, safety and wellbeing matters that impact the operation of the organisation.
The OHS service works closely with business leaders and line managers to achieve shared organisational goals via the
implementation of the OHS Strategic Plan (in accordance with the People Strategy 2019-2022) in order to comply with the OHS Act
2004 and any other relevant legislation and codes.
Employee Services support the organisation and staff by providing end-to-end employment and industrial relations services,
business partnering (human resources advice), human resources administration, and payroll and workers compensation
management.
Page 19

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2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000) ($'000)
Organisational Development
Expenditure
154
275
162
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
154
275
162
Organisational Strategy and Change
Expenditure
0
0
599
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
0
0
599
Expenditure
8,307
11,027
14,388
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
8,307
11,027 14,388
Expenditure
892
997
1,032
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
892
997
1,032
Expenditure
1,062
1,089
1,157
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
1,062
1,089
1,157
Organisational Development delivers on the People Strategy Action Plan – which includes orientation and induction of new staff,
capability frameworks, Performance and Development Plans (PDPs), Engagement Survey initiative, professional development
programs and resources, organisation-wide training, succession planning, leadership capability, recognition and values initiatives,
Inclusion, Equity and Diversity (IED) initiatives.
Organisational Strategy and Change leads the development and implementation of organisational strategy, enterprise change and
internal communications to strengthen staff engagement, alignment and performance. This includes raising awareness and
understanding of the organisational vision and strategic priorities and supporting business areas to ensure enterprise wide change
is effectively and proactively managed.
Information Communications
and Technology (ICT)
Description of services provided
Financial Accounting provides accounting support to the organisation through the accurate reporting of financial transactions and
the day to day management of Council's banking relationship, investment funds and asset accountability. The team also provides
compliance with various external financial reporting and taxation requirements of both State and Federal government.
Information Communications and Technology (ICT) provides a consistent level of support and service to all council departments to
ensure continuity and efficiency in service delivery. ICT offers solution designing, planning and supporting with implementing
existing and new specialist System/Applications. ICT team manages hardware and infrastructure including cyber security across
council.
Information Management
Information Management encompasses the registration, management, storage, retrieval and destruction of all information received
by Council in accordance with Legislative requirements. All service processes are designed around optimal use of digital practices.
Information Management also provides internal support for users of the corporate database.
Financial Accounting
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2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000) ($'000)
Expenditure
2,221
2,338
2,380
(Revenue)
(117)
(50)
(50)
Net Cost
2,105
2,288
2,330
Expenditure
1,104
1,611
1,677
(Revenue)
(265)
(243)
(343)
Net Cost
839
1,368
1,334
Expenditure
501
561
494
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
501
561
494
Expenditure
334
374
329
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
334
374
329
Expenditure
683
830
359
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
683
830
359
Expenditure
364
379
365
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
364
379
365
Expenditure
2,421
2,628
2,904
(Revenue)
(0)
0
0
Net Cost
2,421
2,628
2,904
Expenditure
263
485
537
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
263
485
537
Description of services provided
Risk and Compliance
Risk and Compliance manages all risk Management (Strategic and Operation) and Insurance items for Council, Audit and Risk
Committee and Internal Audit functions.
Management Accounting provides Finance Partnering and Performance Reporting for the organisation. It is responsible for the
preparation of the Annual Budget, long term financial plan and quarterly financial reporting to Council.
Systems Accounting
Systems Accounting are responsible for the management and maintenance of Council's financial and reporting systems.
Procurement and Contracts
Revenue
Revenue Services manage rates and charges in accordance with legislative requirements, Council's Revenue and Rating Plan and
Council's Annual Budget. They are also responsible for accounts receivable, daily banking and receipts.
Management Accounting
Customer Service is Council’s front-line point of contact with the community. Providing professional services over the phone,
through live chat, face-to-face and through written communications, the team also monitors and analyses customer feedback to
better understand the customer experience and to drive service delivery improvement programs.
Enterprise Performance
The Enterprise Performance Team is responsible for the development, implementation and monitoring of Council Plan and Annual
Action Plans. It is also responsible for legislated reporting requirements including Local Government Performance Reporting
Framework (LGPRF), Community Satisfaction Survey (CSS) and the Annual Report. The team provides internal executive headline
reports to support monitoring and performance, as well as implements the organisation-wide Service Planning and Review
Framework.
Procurement and Contracts manage and coordinate the delivery of Council's procurement activities in accordance with the
Procurement Policy to support strategic goals of council.
Strategic Advocacy
Strategic Advocacy is responsible for managing the processes that determine Council's advocacy priorities as well as conceiving
the advocacy strategy and managing the implementation of this strategy. The Department also plays an important role in engaging
with stakeholders and developing partnerships that help achieve Council's desired outcomes.
Customer Service
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2021/22
2022/23 2023/24
Service area
Actual
Forecast Budget
($'000)
($'000) ($'000)
Expenditure
2,203
2,617
2,696
(Revenue)
(189)
(41)
(41)
Net Cost
2,014
2,576
2,655
Expenditure
558
687
876
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
558
687
876
Expenditure
2,551
2,826
3,290
(Revenue)
0
0
(80)
Net Cost
2,551
2,826
3,210
Expenditure
283
314
366
(Revenue)
0
0
0
Net Cost
283
314
366
Strategic theme: Leadership and Governance - Net Total
26,486
31,999
36,587
Description of services provided
Supports Councillors in the performance of their roles by providing a high level of administrative support and engagement activities
and operating as a liaison point for Council Officers who require Councillor attendance or input at community or external events and
meetings.
Communications and
Community Engagement
Communications and Community Engagement leads Council’s communication with the community through a variety of methods
and channels including mainstream and local media, community newsletters and other publications (print and electronic), design
and promotion, website and social media, advertising, strategic advice, consultation and speeches. The team supports genuine and
best practice community engagement to enable meaningful and inclusive opportunities for community to be involved and inform
decision making processes.
Civic Events
Governance and Legal
Governance and Legal support Council to provide good governance for the municipal district, by facilitating good decision making
and municipal elections. The service also tracks and measures compliance with Council's legal and regulatory obligations and co
ordinate regulatory activity and the provision of internal legal advice.
Councillor Support
Civic Events deliver a range of projects/events that engage the community in civic and public life.
Page 22

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Service Performance Outcome Indicators
The following indicators outlines how we intend to measure achievement of service themes.
Indicator
Satisfaction
Net Cost Expenditure (Revenue)
2023/24
2023/24
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Strategic Direction: People and Community
26,591
44,523 (17,931)
Strategic Direction: Place and Spaces
77,915
93,122 (15,188)
Strategic Direction: Opportunity and Prosperity
15,142
16,293 (1,151)
Strategic Direction: Leadership and Governance
36,587
37,101
(514)
Total services and initiatives
156,235
191,038 (34,784)
Added in:
Depreciation
48,529
Borrowing costs
2,383
Finance costs - leases
273
Other non-attributable*
(7,620)
Deficit before funding sources
199,801
Funding sources:
Rates and charges
(180,957)
Operating grants
(25,698)
Capital grants
(1,181)
Total funding sources
(207,835)
Surplus for the year
(8,034)
• Design and deliver a refreshed Advocacy Plan 2023-2025 to guide advocacy initiatives and actions.
• Review the Social Justice Charter to ensure the principles and framework are still relevant and provide a platform for social equity
and inclusion across Council.
• Report on the outcomes of the annual Local Government Community Satisfaction Survey (CSS) and the Local Government
Performance reporting Framework (LGPRF)
• Continue investigations into the use of Smart Sensor devices as a way to improve the serviceability and performance of public
infrastructure assets. This includes smart litter bins, outdoor air quality monitoring, and Parking Overstay Detection System (PODS).
Initiatives
• Undertake a process of deliberative engagement to inform a full review and update of Brimbank’s Community Engagement Policy.
• Utilise the newly established Community Panel to help inform community consultation on Council plans, strategies and projects.
• Maintain Emergency Management Planning Reform at the Municipal level.
2.5 Performance Statement
The service performance indicators detailed in the preceding pages will be reported on within the Performance Statement which is
prepared at the end of the year as required by Section 98 of
the Act
and included in the 2022/2023 Annual Report.
The Performance Statement will also include reporting on prescribed indicators of financial performance and sustainable capacity,
which are not included in this Budget report. The full set of prescribed performance indicators are audited each year by the Victorian
Auditor General who issues an audit opinion on the Performance Statement. The major initiatives detailed in the preceding pages will
be reported in the Annual Report in the form of a statement of progress in the report of operations.
2.6 Reconciliation with budgeted operating result
*Other non-attributable is the net of corporate operations income and expenses that includes interest income, vested assets, net gain
on disposal of assets and bad and doubtful debts.
Service
Performance Measure
Computation
Governance
Satisfaction with Council
decisions
Community satisfaction rating
out of 100 with the
performance of Council in
making decisions in the interest
of the community.
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Statement of Human Resources
3. Financial Statements
Statement of Cash Flows
Statement of Capital Works
This
section
presents
information
in
regard
to
the
Financial
Statements
and
Statement
of
Human
Resources.
The
budget
information
for
the
year
2023/24 has been supplemented with projections to 2026/27.
This
section
includes
the
following
financial
statements
prepared
in
accordance
with
the
Act
and
the
Local
Government
(Planning
and
Reporting) Regulations 2020
:
Comprehensive Income Statement
Balance Sheet
Statement of Changes in Equity
Page 24

image
Comprehensive Income Statement
For the four years ending 30 June 2027
2022/23
2023/24
2024/25
2025/26
2026/27
Notes
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Income / Revenue
Rates and charges
4.1.1
171,814
180,957
188,695
193,912
199,274
Statutory fees and fines
4.1.2
8,169
9,153
9,499
9,689
9,883
User fees
4.1.3
14,840
16,845
18,220
18,949
19,707
Grants - Operating
4.1.4
18,302
25,698
26,670
27,204
27,748
Grants - Capital
4.1.4
16,510
1,181
1,181
1,181
1,181
Contributions - monetary
4.1.5
5,776
4,434
4,601
4,693
4,787
Contributions - non-monetary
4.1.5
1,000
3,300
3,907
3,985
4,064
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of property,
infrastructure, plant and equipment
4.1.6
100
513
45
46
47
Other income
4.1.7
10,142
9,894
10,269
10,474
10,684
Total income / revenue
246,653
251,974
263,087
270,133
277,374
Expenses
Employee costs
4.1.8
93,141
107,690
114,496
117,954
121,516
Materials and services
4.1.9
73,268
78,160
84,454
86,259
87,495
Bad and doubtful debts - allowance for
impairment losses
4.1.10
1,100
1,100
1,100
1,100
1,100
Depreciation
4.1.11
47,288
48,529
44,550
46,540
48,395
Amortisation - right of use assets
4.1.12
2,061
1,775
1,204
1,220
1,236
Borrowing costs
4.1.13
2,290
2,383
3,045
3,289
2,690
Finance costs - leases
4.1.14
332
273
127
128
130
Other expenses
4.1.15
3,435
4,029
5,181
4,265
4,350
Total expenses
222,915
243,940
254,158
260,755
266,913
Surplus/(deficit) for the year
23,738
8,034
8,929
9,378
10,461
Total comprehensive result
23,738
8,034
8,929
9,378
10,461
Forecast
Budget
Projections
Page 25

image
Balance Sheet
For the four years ending 30 June 2027
2022/23
2023/24
2024/25
2025/26
2026/27
Notes
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Assets
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents
96,670
69,853
70,122
49,262
49,885
Trade and other receivables
32,145
35,106
23,563
24,073
24,690
Inventories
139
110
110
110
110
Prepayments
Other assets
0
323
323
323
323
Total current assets
4.2.1
128,954
105,392
94,118
73,768
75,008
Non-current assets
Trade and other receivables
76
115
115
115
115
Property, infrastructure, plant & equipment
2,664,772 2,677,910 2,673,561 2,725,267
2,713,964
Right-of-use assets
3,301
3,115
3,157
3,199
3,242
Total non-current assets
4.2.1
2,668,149 2,681,140 2,676,833 2,728,581
2,717,321
Total assets
2,797,103 2,786,532 2,770,951 2,802,350
2,792,329
Liabilities
Current liabilities
Trade and other payables
21,667
22,561
17,515
17,879
18,291
Trust funds and deposits
9,037
12,642
12,642
12,642
12,642
Provisions
23,166
25,803
25,803
25,803
25,803
Interest-bearing liabilities
4.2.3
9,088
10,462
9,119
32,381
12,641
Lease liabilities
1,696
456
462
468
474
Total current liabilities
4.2.2
64,654
71,924
65,540
89,173
69,851
Non-current liabilities
Provisions
8,598
8,529
8,529
8,529
8,529
Interest-bearing liabilities
4.2.3
78,657
73,539
55,384
53,753
52,573
Lease liabilities
4,023
1,421
1,440
1,459
1,479
Total non-current liabilities
4.2.2
91,279
83,489
65,352
63,741
62,581
Total liabilities
155,933
155,413
130,893
152,914
132,432
Net assets
2,641,171 2,631,119 2,640,058 2,649,436
2,659,897
Equity
Accumulated surplus
1,117,799 1,120,998 1,129,937 1,139,315
1,149,776
Reserves
1,523,372 1,510,121 1,510,121 1,510,121
1,510,121
Total equity
2,641,171 2,631,119 2,640,058 2,649,436
2,659,897
Forecast
Budget
Projections
Page 26

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Statement of Changes in Equity
For the four years ending 30 June 2027
Total
Accumulated
Surplus
Revaluation
Reserve
Other Reserves
Notes
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
2023 Forecast
Balance at beginning of the financial year
2,395,850 1,098,306 1,293,614
3,930
Surplus/(deficit) for the year
23,738
23,738
0
0
Net asset revaluation increment/(decrement)
198,442
0
198,442
0
Transfers to / from other reserves
23,141
(4,245)
0
27,386
Balance at end of the financial year
2,641,171 1,117,799 1,492,056
31,316
2024 Budget
Balance at beginning of the financial year
2,641,171 1,117,799 1,492,056
31,316
Surplus/(deficit) for the year
8,034
8,034
0
0
Net asset revaluation increment/(decrement)
0
0
0
0
Transfers to / from other reserves
4.3.1
(18,086)
(4,835)
0
(13,251)
Balance at end of the financial year
4.3.2
2,631,119 1,120,998 1,492,056
18,065
2025
Balance at beginning of the financial year
2,631,119 1,121,008 1,513,159
(3,038)
Surplus/(deficit) for the year
8,929
8,929
0
0
Net asset revaluation increment/(decrement)
0
0
0
0
Transfers to / from other reserves
0
0
0
0
2,640,048 1,129,937 1,513,159
(3,038)
2026
Balance at beginning of the financial year
2,640,048 1,129,937 1,513,159
(3,038)
Surplus/(deficit) for the year
9,378
9,378
0
0
Net asset revaluation increment/(decrement)
0
0
0
0
Transfers to / from other reserves
0
0
0
0
2,649,426 1,139,315 1,513,159
(3,038)
2027
Balance at beginning of the financial year
2,649,426 1,139,315 1,513,159
(3,038)
Surplus/(deficit) for the year
10,461
10,461
0
0
Net asset revaluation increment/(decrement)
0
0
0
0
Transfers to / from other reserves
0
0
0
0
2,659,887 1,149,776 1,513,159
(3,038)
Balance at end of the financial year
Balance at end of the financial year
Balance at end of the financial year
Page 27

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Statement of Cash Flows
For the four years ending 30 June 2027
2022/23
2023/24
2024/25
2025/26
2026/27
Notes
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Inflows
Inflows
Inflows
Inflows
Inflows
(Outflows)
(Outflows)
(Outflows)
(Outflows)
(Outflows)
Rates and charges
182,373
180,957
194,783
192,695
198,045
Statutory fees and fines
8,169
9,153
10,786
10,597
10,810
User fees
14,841
16,845
20,688
20,694
21,524
Grants
16,274
25,698
27,531
27,048
27,592
Grants - capital
7,186
1,181
1,219
1,176
1,176
Contributions - monetary
5,776
4,434
4,601
4,693
4,787
Trust funds and deposits taken
1,000
1,000
0
0
0
Other receipts
11,505
5,461
12,284
11,896
12,136
Employee costs
(93,141) (107,690) (117,208) (117,670)
(121,224)
Materials and services
(70,923)
(78,160)
(95,100)
(94,721)
(96,133)
Other payments
(4,535)
(5,129)
(5,834)
(4,774)
(4,778)
Net cash provided by/(used in) operating
activities
4.4.1
78,525
53,748
66,585
61,723
64,148
(61,542)
(72,399)
(68,085)
(58,835)
(61,115)
Proceeds from sale of property, infrastructure,
plant and equipment
750
45
50
50
51
Net cash provided by/ (used in) investing
activities
4.4.2
(60,792)
(72,354)
(68,036)
(58,785)
(61,064)
Finance costs
(2,158)
(2,533)
(3,045)
(3,289)
(2,690)
Proceeds from borrowings
7,000
6,000
14,000
12,000
13,000
Repayment of borrowings
(10,303)
(9,020)
(9,119)
(32,381)
(12,641)
Interest paid - lease liability
(332)
(273)
(127)
(128)
(130)
Repayment of lease liabilities
(1,708)
(2,383)
0
0
0
Net cash provided by/(used in) financing
activities
4.4.3
(7,501)
(8,210)
1,709
(23,798)
(2,461)
Net increase/(decrease) in cash & cash
equivalents
10,232
(26,816)
258
(20,859)
623
86,438
96,670
69,863
70,122
49,262
96,670
69,853
70,122
49,262
49,885
Projections
Cash flows from financing activities
Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial
year
Cash flows from operating activities
Cash flows from investing activities
Forecast
Budget
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the
financial year
Payments for property, infrastructure, plant and
equipment
Page 28

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Statement of Capital Works
For the four years ending 30 June 2027
2022/23
2023/24
2024/25
2025/26
2026/27
NOTES
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Property
Land
0
0
0
0
0
Land improvements
0
1,222
100
0
0
Total land
0
1,222
100
0
0
Buildings
8,980
8,149
12,510
8,070
6,355
Total buildings
8,980
8,149
12,510
8,070
6,355
Total property
8,980
9,371
12,610
8,070
6,355
Plant and equipment
3,665
6,469
4,432
4,449
6,335
897
0
0
0
0
Library books
671
0
0
0
0
Total plant and equipment
5,233
6,469
4,432
4,449
6,335
Infrastructure
Roads
26,714
28,748
26,158
25,947
27,300
3,795
3,601
3,880
2,050
2,140
1,682
1,150
950
950
950
6,856
14,273
7,670
5,345
4,995
8,282
8,786
6,195
6,675
7,485
Total infrastructure
47,329
56,558
44,853
40,967
42,870
Total capital works expenditure
4.5.1
61,542
72,399
61,896
53,487
55,560
Represented by:
New asset expenditure
27,678
32,790
24,681
19,180
19,864
Asset renewal expenditure
25,114
27,543
25,304
24,960
24,448
Asset upgrade expenditure
8,750
12,066
11,910
9,346
11,247
Total capital works expenditure
4.5.1
61,542
72,399
61,896
53,487
55,560
Grants
0
1,181
0
0
0
Contributions
0
0
0
0
0
Council cash
61,542
71,218
61,896
53,487
55,560
Total capital works expenditure
4.5.1
61,542
72,399
61,896
53,487
55,560
Recreational, leisure and community facilities
Projections
Plant, Machinery and Equipment
Computers and Telecommunications
Forecast
Budget
Parks, open space and streetscapes
Funding sources represented by:
Footpaths and cycle-ways
Drainage
Page 29

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Statement of Human Resources
For the four years ending 30 June 2027
2022/23
2023/24
2024/25
2025/26
2026/27
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Staff expenditure
Employee costs - operating
93,141
107,690
114,496
117,954
121,516
Employee costs - capital
0
0
0
0
(FTE)
(FTE)
(FTE)
(FTE)
(FTE)
Staff numbers
Employees
920.8
964.2
974.2
984.2
994.2
Total staff numbers
920.8
964.2
974.2
984.2
994.2
Budget
Casual Temporary
2023/24 Full Time Part time
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
CEO & Exec. Services
693
693
0
0
0
Advocacy, Partnerships & Community
7,564
5,216
2,050
0
298
Organisational Excellence
12,286
11,081
364
67
774
Infrastructure and City Services
31,960
29,791
1,040
0
1,129
City Development
15,123
10,937
2,817
47
1,322
Community Wellbeing
40,064
18,216
14,573
5,477
1,798
Total staff expenditure
107,690
75,934
20,843
5,592
5,321
Other expenditure
0
Capitalised labour costs
0
Total expenditure
107,690
Budget
Casual Temporary
2023/24
Full Time
Part time
(FTE)
(FTE)
(FTE)
(FTE)
(FTE)
CEO & Exec. Services
3.0
3.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Advocacy, Partnerships & Community
64.5
42.0
19.5
0.0
3.0
Organisational Excellence
102.7
93.2
4.3
0.4
4.8
Infrastructure and City Services
290.7
272.1
8.7
0.0
9.9
City Development
135.1
89.5
34.3
0.6
10.8
Community Wellbeing
368.2
150.7
146.2
54.1
17.2
Total staff FTE
964.2
650.4
213.0
55.1
45.7
Other
0.0
Capitalised labour
0.0
Total staff
964.2
A summary of the number of full time equivalent (FTE) Council staff in relation to the above expenditure is included below:
A summary of human resources expenditure categorised according to the organisational structure of Council is included below:
Department
Comprises
Permanent
Comprises
Department
Permanent
Forecast
Projections
Budget
Page 30

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3.1 Summary of Planned Human Resources Expenditure
For the four years ending 30 June 2027
2023/24
2024/25
2025/26
2026/27
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
$'000
Employee Expenses
Consolidated
Permanent - Full time
75,934
80,733
83,171
85,683
Female
27,938
29,704
30,601
31,525
Male
36,671
38,989
40,166
41,379
Vacant
11,325
12,040
12,404
12,779
Permanent - Part time
20,843
22,160
22,830
23,519
Female
15,211
16,172
16,661
17,164
Male
5,632
5,988
6,169
6,355
Vacant
0
0
0
0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
10,913
11,603
11,953
12,314
Total Brimbank City Council
107,690 114,496 117,954 121,516
Office of the Chief Executive Officer
Permanent - Full time
693
737
760
782
Female
462
491
506
522
Male
231
246
253
261
Vacant
0
0
0
0
Permanent - Part time
0
0
0
0
Female
0
0
0
0
Male
0
0
0
0
Vacant
0
0
0
0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
0
0
0
Total Office of the Chief Executive Officer
693
737
760
782
Organisational Excellence
Permanent - Full time
11,081
11,781
12,137
12,504
Female
4,875
5,183
5,339
5,501
Male
2,770
2,945
3,034
3,126
Vacant
3,436
3,653
3,764
3,877
Permanent - Part time
364
387
398
410
Female
228
243
250
258
Male
135
144
148
153
Vacant
0
0
0
0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
841
894
921
949
Total Organisational Excellence
12,286
13,063
13,457
13,863
City Development Division
Permanent - Full time
10,937
11,628
11,979
12,341
Female
5,310
5,646
5,817
5,992
Male
4,087
4,345
4,476
4,612
Vacant
1,539
1,637
1,686
1,737
Permanent - Part time
2,817
2,995
3,085
3,179
Female
1,592
1,692
1,744
1,796
Male
1,225
1,302
1,342
1,382
Vacant
0
0
0
0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
1,369
1,456
1,500
1,545
Total City Development Division
15,123
16,078
16,564
17,064
Community Wellbeing Division
Permanent - Full time
18,216
19,367
19,952
20,555
Female
10,479
11,141
11,478
11,825
Male
3,419
3,635
3,745
3,858
Vacant
4,318
4,591
4,729
4,872
Permanent - Part time
14,573
15,494
15,962
16,444
Female
10,988
11,683
12,035
12,399
Male
3,585
3,811
3,927
4,045
Vacant
0
0
0
0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
7,275
7,735
7,969
8,209
Total Community Wellbeing Division
40,064
42,596
43,883
45,208
Page 31

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2023/24
2024/25
2025/26
2026/27
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
$'000
Advocacy, Partnerships & Community
Permanent - Full time
5,216
5,546
5,713
5,886
Female
3,698
3,932
4,051
4,173
Male
909
967
996
1,026
Vacant
609
647
667
687
Permanent - Part time
2,050
2,179
2,245
2,313
Female
1,646
1,750
1,803
1,857
Male
404
429
442
456
Vacant
0
0
0
0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
298
317
327
336
Total Advocacy, Partnerships & Community
7,564
8,042
8,285
8,535
Infrastructure and City Services
Permanent - Full time
29,791
31,674
32,630
33,616
Female
3,985
4,237
4,365
4,497
Male
24,178
25,706
26,482
27,282
Vacant
1,628
1,731
1,783
1,837
Permanent - Part time
1,040
1,106
1,139
1,173
Female
893
949
978
1,007
Male
147
156
161
166
Vacant
0
0
0
0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
1,129
1,201
1,237
1,274
Total Infrastructure and City Services
31,960
33,980
35,006
36,063
Total employee expenses
107,690 114,496 117,954 121,516 .
2023/24 2024/25 2025/26 2026/27
(FTE)
(FTE)
(FTE)
FTE
Staff FTE Numbers
Consolidated
Permanent - Full time
650.4
657.15
663.89
670.64
Female
239.3
241.75
244.23
246.72
Male
314.1
317.38
320.63
323.89
Vacant
97.0
97.98
98.98
99.99
Permanent - Part time
213.0
215.20
217.41
219.62
Female
155.4
157.0
158.66
160.27
Male
57.6
58.2
58.75
59.34
Vacant
0.0
-
-
-
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
100.8
101.86
102.90
103.95
Total Consolidated
964.2
974.2
984.2
994.2
Office of the Chief Executive Officer
Permanent - Full time
3.0
3.0
3.1
3.1
Female
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.1
Male
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
Vacant
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Permanent - Part time
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Female
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Male
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Vacant
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Total Office of the Chief Executive Officer
3.0
3.0
3.1
3.1
Organisational Excellence
Permanent - Full time
93.2
94.2
95.1
96.1
Female
41.0
41.43
41.9
42.3
Male
23.3
23.54
23.8
24.0
Vacant
28.9
29.20
29.5
29.8
Permanent - Part time
4.3
4.34
4.4
4.4
Female
2.7
2.73
2.8
2.8
Male
1.6
1.62
1.6
1.6
Vacant
0.0
0.00
0.0
0.0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
5.2
5.25
5.3
5.4
Total Organisational Excellence
102.7
103.8
104.8
105.9
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2023/24 2024/25 2025/26 2026/27
(FTE)
(FTE)
(FTE)
FTE
City Development Division
Permanent - Full time
89.5
90.4
91.3
92.2
Female
43.4
43.9
44.3
44.8
Male
33.4
33.8
34.1
34.5
Vacant
12.6
12.7
12.9
13.0
Permanent - Part time
34.3
34.7
35.0
35.4
Female
19.4
19.6
19.8
20.0
Male
14.9
15.1
15.2
15.4
Vacant
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
11.4
11.5
11.6
11.7
Total City Development Division
135.1
136.5
137.9
139.3
Community Wellbeing Division
Permanent - Full time
150.7
152.2
153.8
155.3
Female
86.7
87.6
88.5
89.4
Male
28.3
28.6
28.9
29.2
Vacant
35.7
36.1
36.5
36.8
Permanent - Part time
146.2
147.7
149.2
150.7
Female
110.2
111.4
112.5
113.7
Male
36.0
36.3
36.7
37.1
Vacant
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
71.4
72.1
72.8
73.6
Total Community Wellbeing Division
368.2
372.0
375.8
379.6
Advocacy, Partnerships & Community
Permanent - Full time
42.0
42.4
42.9
43.3
Female
29.8
30.1
30.4
30.7
Male
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.5
Vacant
4.9
5.0
5.0
5.1
Permanent - Part time
19.5
19.7
19.9
20.1
Female
15.7
15.8
16.0
16.1
Male
3.8
3.9
3.9
4.0
Vacant
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
3.0
3.0
3.1
3.1
Total Advocacy, Partnerships & Community
64.5
65.2
65.8
66.5
Infrastructure and City Services
Permanent - Full time
272.1
274.9
277.7
280.5
Female
36.4
36.8
37.1
37.5
Male
220.8
223.1
225.4
227.7
Vacant
14.9
15.0
15.2
15.3
Permanent - Part time
8.7
8.8
8.9
9.0
Female
7.5
7.5
7.6
7.7
Male
1.2
1.2
1.3
1.3
Vacant
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Casuals, temporary and other expenditure
9.9
10.0
10.1
10.2
Total Infrastructure and City Services
290.7
293.7
296.7
299.7
Total staff FTE numbers
964.2
974.2
984.2
994.2
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4.1 Comprehensive Income Statement
4.1.1 Rates and charges
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000) $’000
%
General rates*
130,273
136,437
6,164
4.73
Municipal charge*
6,856
6,577
(279)
(4.07)
Public Amenities Cleansing levy
6,670
6,902
232
3.48
Waste management charge
27,085
30,241
3,156
11.65
Supplementary rates and rate adjustments
717
800
83
11.58
Total rates and charges
171,601
180,957
9,356
5.45
Interest on rates and charges
1,600
1,600
00
0.00
Total rates and charges (incl. interest)
173,201
182,557
9,356
5.40
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
cents/$CIV cents/$CIV
%
General rate for rateable residential properties
0.18053
0.17387
(3.69)
General rate for rateable residential flats/units properties 0.18053
0.17387
(3.69)
General rate for rateable commercial/industrial properties 0.38112
0.36707
(3.69)
General rate for rateable vacant land properties
0.37649
0.36261
(3.69)
General
rate
for
rateable
commercial/industrial
vacant
land
properties
0.61720
0.59444
(3.69)
General rate for rateable retirement village properties
0.16819
0.16198
(3.69)
General rate for rateable farm properties
0.15430
0.14861
(3.69)
General rate for rateable cultural and recreational land
0.19288
0.18353
(4.85)
Change
Change
4.1.1(b) The rate in the dollar to be levied as general rates under section 158 of
the Local government Act 1989
for each type or
class of land compared with the previous financial year:
4. Notes to the financial statements
This section presents detailed information on material components of the financial statements. Council needs to assess which
components are material, considering the dollar amounts and nature of these components.
Rates and charges are required by the Act and the Regulations to be disclosed in Council’s budget.
As per the Local Government Act 2020, Council is required to have a Revenue and Rating Plan which is a four year plan for how
Council will generate income to deliver the Council Plan, program and services and capital works commitments over a four-year
period.
In developing the Budget, rates and charges were identified as an important source of revenue. Planning for future rate increases
has therefore been an important component of the financial planning process. The Fair Go Rates System (FGRS) sets out the
maximum amount councils may increase rates in a year. For 2023/24 the FGRS cap has been set at 3.50%. The cap applies to
both general rates and municipal charges and is calculated on the basis of council’s average rates and charges.
The level of required rates and charges has been considered in this context, with reference to Council's other sources of income
and the planned expenditure on services and works to be undertaken for the community.
To achieve these objectives while maintaining service levels and a strong capital expenditure program, the average general rate
and the municipal charge will increase by 3.50% in line with the rate cap.
This will raise total rates and charges for 2023/24 to $180.96 million, including $0.800 million generated from supplementary
rates.
4.1.1(a) The reconciliation of the total rates and charges to the Comprehensive Income Statement is as follows:
*These items are subject to the rate cap established under the FGRS
Type or class of land
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Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000) $’000
%
Residential
69,987
67,333
(2,654)
(3.79)
Residential Flats/Units
12,532
12,856
324
2.59
Commercial/Industrial
39,295
47,266
7,971
20.28
Vacant Land
3,417
3,247
(170)
(4.99)
Commercial/Industrial Vacant Land
4,649
5,332
683
14.69
Retirement Village
265
279
14
5.33
Farm
68
64
(4)
(5.48)
Cultural and Recreational Land
60
60
0
0.43
Total amount to be raised by general rates
130,273
136,437
6,164
4.73
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
Number
Number $’000
%
Residential
55,505
55,393
(84)
(0.15)
Residential flats/Units
15,209
15,939
714
4.69
Commercial/Industrial
6,498
6,638
116
1.79
Vacant Land
1,401
1,317
(83)
(5.92)
Commercial/Industrial Vacant Land
625
599
(16)
(2.56)
Retirement Village
492
532
41
8.33
Farm
22
22
0
0.00
Cultural and Recreational Land
3
3
0
0.00
Total number of assessments
79,755
80,443
688
0.86
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000) $’000
%
Residential
38,933,241
38,725,590
(207,651)
(0.53)
Residential flats/Units
6,971,389
7,393,687
422,298
6.06
Commercial/Industrial
10,354,560
12,876,869
2,522,309
24.36
Vacant Land
911,553
895,389
(16,164)
(1.77)
Commercial/Industrial Vacant Land
756,407
896,948
140,541
18.58
Retirement Village
158,199
172,479
14,280
9.03
Farm
43,790
43,260
(530)
(1.21)
Cultural and Recreational Land
31,300
32,750
1,450
4.63
Total value of land
58,160,439
61,036,972
2,876,533
4.95
Per Rateable
Property
Per Rateable
Property
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
$
$ $
%
Municipal
85.96
81.75
(4)
(4.90)
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
$’000
%
Municipal
6,856
6,577
(279)
(4.07)
4.1.1(c) The estimated total amount to be raised by general rates in relation to each type or class of land, and the estimated total
amount to be raised by general rates, compared with the previous financial year:
Type of Charge
Change
Type or class of land
4.1.1(d) The number of assessments in relation to each type or class of land, and the total number of assessments, compared
with the previous financial year:
Type or class of land
4.1.1(f) The estimated total value of each type or class of land, and the estimated total value of land, compared with the previous
financial year:
Type or class of land
4.1.1(g) The municipal charge under Section 159 of
the Local government Act 1989
compared with the previous financial year:
Change
Change
4.1.1(e) The basis of valuation to be used is the Capital Improved Value (CIV).
Change
4.1.1(h) The estimated total amount to be raised by municipal charges compared with the previous financial year:
Type of Charge
Change
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Per Rateable
Property
Per Rateable
Property
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
$
$ $
%
80ltr Environmental Charge
199.38
220.48
21
10.58
140ltr Environmental Charge
324.10
361.03
37
11.39
240ltr Environmental Charge
580.24
643.55
63
10.91
140ltr Green Waste Charge
93.79
98.34
5
4.85
240ltr Green Waste Charge
102.15
109.95
8
7.64
Public Amenities Cleansing levy
83.63
85.80
2
2.59
Total
1,383.29
1,519.15
136
9.82
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000) $’000
%
80ltr Environmental Charge
625
750
126
20.12
140ltr Environmental Charge
21,509
23,937
2,428
11.29
240ltr Environmental Charge
910
990
80
8.78
140ltr Green Waste Charge
1,081
1,167
86
8.00
240ltr Green Waste Charge
3,076
3,397
321
10.43
Public Amenities Cleansing levy
6,710
6,902
192
2.86
Total
33,910
37,143
3,233
9.53
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000) $’000
%
Rates
130,273
136,437
6,164
4.73
Municipal charge
6,856
6,577
(279)
(4.07)
Service rates and charges
33,910
37,143
3,233
9.53
Supplementary rates
775
800
25
3.23
Total Rates and charges
171,814
180,957
9,143
5.32
4.1.1(l) FGRS Compliance
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
171,813,984
$ 138,195,911
79,755
80,443
2,154
$ 1,718
1.75%
3.50%
1,719
$ 1,778
137,137,058
$ 143,032,768
137,129,120
$ 143,013,658
Budgeted Supplementary Rates
615,000
$ 800,000
137,744,120
$ 143,813,658
• The variation of returned levels of value (e.g. valuation appeals)
• Changes of use of land such that rateable land becomes non-rateable land and vice versa
• Changes of use of land such that residential land becomes business land and vice versa.
Base Average Rate
Maximum Rate Increase (set by the State Government)
Capped Average Rate
Maximum General Rates and Municipal Charges Revenue
Budgeted General Rates and Municipal Charges Revenue
Budgeted Total Rates and Municipal Charges Revenue
4.1.1(j) The estimated total amount to be raised by each type of service rate or charge, and the estimated total amount to be
raised by service rates and charges, compared with the previous financial year:
Type of Charge
4.1.1(k) The estimated total amount to be raised by all rates and charges compared with the previous financial year:
4.1.1(i) The rate or unit amount to be levied for each type of service rate or charge under Section 162 of
the Local government
Act 1989
compared with the previous financial year:
Change
• The making of supplementary valuations (2023/24: estimated $800,000 and 2022/23: $615,000)
4.1.1(m) Any significant changes that may affect the estimated amounts to be raised by rates and charges.
There are no known significant changes which may affect the estimated amounts to be raised by rates and charges. However,
the total amount to be raised by rates and charges may be affected by:
Type of Charge
Change
Change
Brimbank City Council is required to comply with the State Government’s FGRS. The table below details the Annual Budget
assumptions consistent with the requirements of the FGRS.
Total Rates
Number of rateable properties
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The rate and amount of rates payable in relation to land in each category of differential are:
• A general rate of 0.17387% (0.17387 cents in the dollar of CIV) for all rateable residential properties;
• A general rate of 0.36707% (0.36707 cents in the dollar of CIV) for all rateable commercial or industrial properties;
• A general rate of 0.36261% (0.36261 cents in the dollar of CIV) for all rateable vacant land properties;
• A general rate of 0.59444% (0.59444 cents in the dollar of CIV) for all rateable commercial/industrial vacant land
properties;
• A general rate of 0.14861% (0.14861 cents in the dollar of CIV) for all rateable farm properties; and
Residential Property
Retirement village property is any property, which is defined as a Retirement Village under the
Retirement Villages Act 1986
.
Rateable assessments under the retirement village classification will be charged at a rate of 109% of the lowest rate.
Council considers that each differential rate will contribute to the equitable and efficient carrying out of council functions. Details
of the objectives of each differential rate, the types of classes of land, which are subject to each differential rate and the uses of
each differential rate, are set out below.
Residential property is any property, which is used for private residential purposes, including but not limited to houses and
dwellings together with vacant unoccupied houses or dwellings and includes vacant land which is located within the Solomon
Heights Estate in North Sunshine which is bounded on the east by the Melbourne to Sydney freight line and is north of Munro
Avenue, east of Vermont Avenue and south of Baldwin Avenue. It excludes motels, caravan parks, supported accommodation,
accommodation houses, boarding houses and the like.
The geographical location of the land within this differential rate is wherever located within the municipal district, without
reference to ward boundaries.
The money raised by the differential rate will be applied to the items of expenditure described in the Annual Budget by Council.
The level of the rate for this category is considered to provide for an appropriate contribution to Council’s budgeted expenditure,
having regards to the characteristics of the land.
Residential Flat/Unit Property
Residential Flat/Unit property is any property which is used for private residential purposes, including but not limited to flats,
units, dual occupancy dwellings together with vacant flats, units, dual occupancy dwellings. It excludes motels, caravan parks,
supported accommodation, accommodation houses, boarding houses and the like.
• A general rate of 0.17387% (0.17387 cents in the dollar of CIV) for all rateable residential flats and units properties;
• A general rate of 0.16198% (0.16198 cents in the dollar of CIV) for all rateable retirement village properties;
• A general rate of 0.18353% (0.18353 cents in the dollar of CIV) for all rateable cultural and recreational properties.
Each differential rate will be determined by multiplying the CIV of each rateable land (categorised by the characteristics
described below) by the relevant percentages indicated above.
4.1.1(n) Differential rates
Rates to be levied:
The money raised by the differential rate will be applied to the items of expenditure described in the Annual Budget by Council.
The level of the rate for this category is considered to provide for an appropriate contribution to Council’s budgeted expenditure,
having regards to the characteristics of the land.
The geographical location of the land within this differential rate is wherever located within the municipal district, without
reference to ward boundaries.
The rate reflects the level of service provided and ensures that reasonable rate relativity is maintained between residential
flat/unit property and other classes of property.
Retirement Village Property
The rate reflects the level of service provided and ensures that reasonable rate relativity is maintained between retirement village
property and other classes of property.
The money raised by the differential rate will be applied to the items of expenditure described in the Annual Budget by Council.
The level of the rate for this category is considered to provide for an appropriate contribution to Council’s budgeted expenditure,
having regards to the characteristics of the land.
The geographical location of the land within this differential rate is wherever located within the municipal district, without
reference to ward boundaries. The rate reflects the level of service provided and ensures that reasonable rate relativity is
maintained between residential property and other classes of property.
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- Commercial/Industrial Vacant Land; or
but does not include land which is located within the Solomon Heights Estate in North Sunshine which is bounded on the east by
the Melbourne to Sydney freight line and is north of Munro Avenue, east of Vermont Avenue and south of Baldwin Avenue.
This rate is set higher to encourage development of vacant land sites and ensure that vacant land property owners make a fair
and reasonable contribution for current and future infrastructure development.
The money raised by the differential rate will be applied to the items of expenditure described in the Annual Budget by Council.
The level of the rate for this category is considered to provide for an appropriate contribution to Council’s budgeted expenditure,
having regards to the characteristics of the land.
The rate reflects the level of service provided and ensures that reasonable rate relativity is maintained between vacant land and
other classes of land.
- Farm Property,
Commercial/Industrial Developed Property
Commercial/Industrial developed land is any land on which a building designed or adapted for occupation is erected to be used
for business and/or administrative purposes, which are used primarily for manufacturing processes, including, but not limited to
properties used for:
• unimproved land; and
• Media broadcasting/communication establishments, e.g. television stations, newspaper offices, radio stations,
and associated facilities;
• Mixed businesses/milk bars (those operating in a residential type zone under the Brimbank Planning Scheme and
nonconforming residential/milk bar properties within industrial zones under the Brimbank Planning Scheme with
attached residences, occupied as the principal place of residence of the person(s) operating the mixed business/
milk bar component of the rateable property, will have the residential portion rated as residential);
The geographical location of the land within this differential rate is wherever located within the municipal district, without
reference to ward boundaries.
• Showrooms, e.g. display of goods;
• Commercial storage, e.g. mini storage units, wholesale distributors;
• The sale or hire of goods by retail sales, e.g. shops, auction rooms, hardware stores;
• The manufacture of goods where the goods are sold on the property;
• The provision of entertainment, e.g. theatres, cinemas, amusement parlors, nightclubs;
• The provision of accommodation other than private residential, e.g. motels, caravan parks, camping grounds, camps,
supported accommodation, accommodation houses, hostels, boarding houses;
• Tourist and leisure industry, e.g. flora and fauna parks, gymnasiums, golf courses, indoor sport stadiums, gaming
establishments;
• The provision of hospitality, e.g. hotels, bottle shops, restaurants, cafés, takeaway food establishments, tearooms;
• Brothels;
• Warehouse/bulk storage of goods;
• The treatment and storage of industrial waste materials;
• Properties used for the provision of health services, hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation, medical practices and
dental practices; and
The geographical location of the land within this differential rate is wherever located within the municipal district, without
reference to ward boundaries.
The rate is set higher than base rate to recognise that there is generally a higher capacity to pay due to the income capacity of
the property.
• Properties used as offices.
The money raised by the differential rate will be applied to the items of expenditure described in the Annual Budget by Council.
The level of the rate for this category is considered to provide for an appropriate contribution to Council’s budgeted expenditure,
having regards to the characteristics of the land.
Vacant Land
• which does not have the characteristics of:
• Halls for commercial hire;
• The manufacture of goods, equipment, plant, machinery, food or beverage which are generally not sold or consumed
on site;
Vacant land is any land, which is:
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Under the
Cultural and Recreational Land Act 1963
, provision is made for a Council to grant a rating concession to any
“recreational lands” which meet the test of being “rateable land” under the
Local Government Act 1989
.
The rate reflects the level of service provided and ensures that reasonable rate relativity is maintained between vacant land and
other classes of land.
Farm Property
Farm property is any land, which is:
• Not less than 2 hectares in area;
• Used for the carrying of a business of primary production as determined by the Australian Taxation Office; and
• Used primarily for grazing, dairying, pig farming, poultry farming, fish farming, tree farming, bee keeping, viticulture,
horticulture, fruit growing, or the growing of crops of any kind or for any combination of these activities.
Commercial/Industrial Vacant land is any land on which no building designed or adapted for occupation is erected and is located
within:
• Industrial 1, 2 or 3 Zone;
• an Activity Centre Zone with an approved precinct plan for commercial or industrial use;
• a Mixed Used Zone;
• a Special Use Zone.
Rateable assessments that receive a Cultural & Recreational Land rate will be classified as Commercial/Industrial and will be
charged at 50% of the Commercial/Industrial rate in the dollar.
The money raised by the differential rate will be applied to the items of expenditure described in the Annual Budget by Council.
The level of the rate for this category is considered to provide for an appropriate contribution to Council’s budgeted expenditure,
having regards to the characteristics of the land.
Commercial/Industrial Vacant Land
• a Comprehensive Development Zone with an approved Concept Plan for commercial use; or
This rate is set higher to encourage development of Commercial/Industrial vacant land sites and ensure that
Commercial/Industrial vacant land property owners make a fair and reasonable contribution for current and future infrastructure
development.
The money raised by the differential rate will be applied to the items of expenditure described in the Annual Budget by Council.
The level of the rate for this category is considered to provide for an appropriate contribution to Council’s budgeted expenditure,
having regards to the characteristics of the land.
The geographical location of the land within this differential rate is wherever located within the municipal district, without
reference to ward boundaries.
The geographical location of the land within this differential rate is wherever located within the municipal district, without
reference to ward boundaries.
Cultural and Recreational Land
but does not include land which is located within the Solomon Heights Estate in North Sunshine which is bounded on the east by
the Melbourne to Sydney freight line and is north of Munro Avenue, east of Vermont Avenue and south of Baldwin Avenue.
The rate reflects the level of service provided and ensures that reasonable rate relativity is maintained between recreational land
and other classes of land.
The farm rate is lower than for other classes of land due to farming operations involving large properties which tend to have
significant value and which are often operated as family concerns. Agricultural producers are unable to pass on increases in
costs like other businesses. Farm profitability is affected by the fluctuations of weather and international markets. In this sense,
farms are seen to be more susceptible or fragile than other commercial and industrial operations.
The money raised by the differential rate will be applied to the items of expenditure described in the Annual Budget by Council.
The level of the rate for this category is considered to provide for an appropriate contribution to Council’s budgeted expenditure,
having regards to the characteristics of the land.
The geographical location of the land within this differential rate is wherever located within the municipal district, without
reference to ward boundaries.
• Commercial 1, 2 or 3 Zone;
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4.1.2 Statutory fees and Fines
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Infringements and costs
4,413
5,109
696
15.77
Court recoveries
0
11
11
100.00
Town planning fees
1,370
1,475
105
7.70
Permits
381
475
94
24.56
Land information certificates
110
125
15
13.90
Registrations
1,832
1,882
50
2.70
Other
63
76
13
20.67
Total statutory fees and fines
8,169
9,153
984 12.04
4.1.3 User fees
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Aged services
516
535
20
3.82
Leisure centre, art and recreation
12,276
13,962
1,686
13.74
Child care/children's program
24
47
23
97.50
Planning and compliance
946
1,052
106
11.23
Building services
204
298
94
46.09
Waste management services
3
0
(3) (100.00)
Non voter infringements
20
40
20
100.00
Land clearance
2
0
(2) (100.00)
Local laws
439
623
183
41.74
Other
412
288
(123)
(29.97)
Total user fees
14,840
16,845
2,005 13.51
Change
• They are in accordance with the Brimbank Social Justice Charter
A detailed listing of fees and charges is included in Appendix A.
A detailed listing of statutory fees and non-statutory fees is included in Appendix A.
User charges relate mainly to the recovery of service delivery costs through the charging of fees to users of Council’s services.
These include use of leisure facilities, community facilities and the provision of community wellbeing such as family day care and
home help services.
User fees are projected to increase by $2.01 million or 13.51% compared to the 2022/2023 forecast. This is predominately due to
higher income from the Brimbank Aquatic & Wellness Centre (BAWC) as memberships are projected to increase in 2023/24.
The 2022/23 forecast incorporates the impact of the three months delays in the opening of the Brimbank Aquatic & Wellness
Centre (BAWC).
Change
In setting the Annual Budget, the key principle for determining the level of user fees has been to ensure:
• Increases are kept to a minimum or in line with market levels
• They are not charged more than actual expenditure
• They are in compliance with the National Competition Policy
The increase of $0.98 million or 12.04% compared to 2022/23 forecast is due to an increase in compliance fees driven by higher
permits and registrations fees collected as Covid measures lapse.
Statutory fees relate mainly to fees and fines levied in accordance with legislation and include animal registrations, health
registrations, planning and building fees and parking fines. Statutory fees are set in accordance with legislative requirements.
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4.1.4 Grants
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Grants are budgeted to be received in respect of the
following:
Summary of grants
Commonwealth funded grants
9,659
16,285
6,626
68.60
State funded grants
25,152
10,594
(14,558)
(57.88)
Total grants
34,811
26,879
(7,932)
(22.79)
(a) Operating Grants
Recurrent - Commonwealth government
Financial assistance grants
3,819
14,852
11,033
288.88
Arts and cultural development
62
39
(23)
(37.08)
Other
221
213
(8)
(3.62)
Recurrent - State government
Community Health
1,317
1,248
(69)
(5.21)
School crossing supervisors
768
768
0
0.00
Maternal and child health
3,668
2,766
(903)
(24.61)
Aged care
3,419
3,187
(231)
(6.77)
Family and children
20
20
0
0.00
Libraries and learning
1,420
1,394
(26)
(1.80)
Recreation
423
497
74
17.39
Total recurrent operating grants
15,137
24,984
9,847
65.05
Non-recurrent - Commonwealth Government
Other
0
0
0
0.00
Non-recurrent - State government
Recreation - State (NR)
534
0
(534) (100.00)
Planning and development
280
396
116
41.35
Other
1,412
168
(1,245)
(88.14)
Community health and safety
829
150
(679)
(81.90)
Maternal and child health
109
0
(109) (100.00)
Total non-recurrent operating grants
3,164
713
(2,451)
(77.45)
Total operating grants
18,301
25,698
7,397
40.42
(b) Capital Grants
Recurrent - Commonwealth government
Roads to recovery
1,181
1,181
0
0.00
Recurrent - State Government
Libraries and learning
0
0
0
0.00
Total recurrent capital grants
1,181
1,181
0.00
0.00
Non recurrent - Commonwealth government
Roads
3,144
0
(3,144) (100.00)
Recreational, leisure and community facilities
912
0
(912) (100.00)
Parks, open space and streetscapes
320
0
(320)
-
Non-recurrent - State government
Roads
3,600
0
(3,600) (100.00)
Buildings
1,637
0
(1,637) (100.00)
Parks, open space and streetscapes
476
0
(476) (100.00)
Recreational, leisure and community facilities
5,240
0
(5,240) (100.00)
Total non-recurrent capital grants
15,329
0
(15,329) (100.00)
Total capital grants
16,510
1,181
(15,329)
(92.85)
Total grants
34,811
26,879
(7,932)
(22.79)
Change
For the 2023/24 year, Council is expecting to receive $26.68 million in Grants which is a decrease of ($7.93 million) or 22.79%
compared to the 2022/23 forecast.
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4.1.5 Contributions
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Monetary
5,777
4,434
(1,344)
(23.26)
Non-monetary
1,000
3,300
2,300
230.00
Total contributions
6,777
7,734
956
14.11
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of plant and equipment
(100)
(513)
(413) 413.18
Net gain/(loss) on disposal of property and infrastructure
0
0
0
0.00
Total Net gain/(loss) on disposal of property,
infrastructure, plant and equipment
(100)
(513)
(413)
413.18
Non–monetary Contributions relate to assets that arise out of new subdivisions within the municipality and are vested to Council.
The level of the non-monetary contributions anticipated in 2023/24 is $3.30 million, an increment of $2.30 million compared to
2022/23 as COVID-19 lapses.
Council regularly assesses its land holdings to ensure Council owned land best meets the needs of the community. Through this
process, land is both purchased and, where it is identified as being surplus to Council’s needs, proposed for sale.
4.1.6 Net gain/(loss) on disposal of property, infrastructure, plant and equipment
A net loss of $0.41 million is projected for 2023/24.
Change
Proceeds from the sale of Council assets relate mainly to the sale of Council owned land and the planned cyclical replacement of
part of the plant and vehicle fleet.
Change
Monetary Contributions relate to monies received from Developer Contributions, State Government, Federal Government,
Special Rates schemes and community sources. Overall, the level of monetary contributions expected for 2023/24 is $4.43
million which has decreased by ($1.34 million) or 23.26 % compared to 2022/23. This is mainly due to the decrease in number of
subdivision budgeted during the 2022/23 year.
A list of operating and capital grants by type and source, classified into recurrent and non-recurrent is included in the table
above.
Operating Grants include all monies received from State and Commonwealth sources for the purposes of funding the delivery of
the Council’s services to ratepayers. Overall, the operating grant level is projected to increase by $7.40 million or 40.42%
compared to the 2022/23 forecast.
The 2022/23 forecast reflects lower grants due to the recurrent operating grants (Victorian Grants Commission funding) being
paid to Brimbank earlier than anticipated and was recognised in the 2021/2022 financial year.
Capital Grants include all monies received from State, Commonwealth and community sources for the purposes of funding the
capital works program. Overall, the level of capital grants is expected to decrease by ($15.33 million) or 92.85% compared to
2022/23. This largely due to one-off State Government COVID-19 economic stimulus grants received in 2021/22 financial year,
and was carried forward to be utilised in 2022/23.
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4.1.7 Other income
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Interest
4,170
4,670
500
11.99
Rent
2,206
2,180
(26)
(1.17)
Recovery
840
987
147
17.53
Rebates
76
75
(1)
(1.71)
Subdivisional fees
349
209
(140)
(40.11)
Legal costs recovery
555
500
(55)
(9.91)
Special charges
280
318
38
13.69
Compensation recovery
499
0
(499) (100.00)
Insurance recovery
65
50
(15)
(23.26)
Other
1,102
905
(196)
(17.77)
Total other income
10,142
9,894
(248)
(2.44)
4.1.8 Employee costs
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Wages and salaries
82,127
95,526
13,400
16.32
WorkCover
2,259
1,939
(320)
(14.17)
Superannuation
8,536
10,018
1,482
17.36
Fringe benefits tax
220
208
(12)
(5.45)
Total employee costs
93,141
107,690
14,549
15.62
4.1.9 Materials and services
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Contract payments
36,560
35,816
(744)
(2.03)
General maintenance
5,058
4,565
(493)
(9.74)
Materials and services
11,799
12,843
1,044
8.85
Consultants
2,805
4,621
1,815
64.72
Information technology
4,136
5,384
1,248
30.18
Insurance
2,486
2,620
134
5.40
Utilities
5,751
7,215
1,463
25.44
Other
4,673
5,096
424
9.07
Total materials and services
73,268
78,160
4,892
6.68
Employee costs are budgeted to increase by $14.55 million or 15.62% compared to the 2022/23 forecast. This is predominately
due to:
Change
• The impact of unfilled vacancies across the council in 2022/23, mostly due to the delays in opening Brimbank Aquatic &
Wellness Centre (BAWC). The budget for 2023/24 is based on the assumption that every position will be filled throughout the
year. Much of the vacancies in 2022/23 were backfilled by contract labour (forecasted as Agency costs in materials and services)
• The Council shifted from Enterprise Bargaining Agreement 8 (EA8) to the new Enterprise Bargaining Agreement 9 (EA9)
• Reclassification of existing staff positions and band movements across the council
Change
Other income relates to a range of items such as private works, cost recoveries and other miscellaneous income items. It also
includes interest revenue on investments and rate arrears.
Other income is budgeted to decrease by ($0.13 million) or 2.44% compared to the 2022/23 forecast. This is mainly due to
unbudgeted Compensation recovery of $0.50 million received in 2022/23, offset by expected increases in Rental/Lease income
and Interest income on Rates and Investments.
Employee costs include all labour related expenditure such as wages and salaries, allowances, leave entitlements, employer
superannuation, etc. Payments to contract employees are not included in this cost category.
Change
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4.1.10 Bad and doubtful debts
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Parking infringement debtors and other
1,100
1,100
0
0.00
Total bad and doubtful debts
1,100
1,100
0
-
4.1.11 Depreciation
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Property
3,794
4,270
476
12.54
Plant & equipment
3,872
4,009
137
3.54
Infrastructure
39,622
40,250
628
1.58
Total depreciation
47,288
48,529
1,240
2.62
4.1.12 Amortisation - right of use assets
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Amortisation - right of use assets
2,061
1,775
(286)
(13.86)
Total amortisation - right of use assets
2,061
1,775
(286)
(13.86)
• Increase in Consultants costs by $1.82 million mostly in IT support, for the M365 Implementation costs, ICT Fleet Operational
and Corporate Backend Systems Consolidation and Uplift projects
This is partly offset by decreases attributable to:
• Reduction in contract payments (Agency costs) primarily due to anticipation that vacancies backfilled by contract staff in
2022/23 become filled with staff in 2023/24.
Depreciation is an accounting measure which attempts to allocate the value of an asset over its useful life for Council’s property,
plant and equipment including infrastructure assets such as roads and drains.
Overall, the level of bad and doubtful debts is budgeted to remain the same as the 2022/23 forecast. This is also in keeping with
prior year trends.
Materials and services include the purchases of consumables, payments to contractors for the provision of services and utility
costs.
Change
Material and services are budgeted to increase by $4.88 million or 6.66% compared to the forecast for 2022/23. Significant
increases are:
• Increase in Information Technology costs of $1.25 million due to increased fees for licences and certificates as well
as additional software purchases.
The increase of $1.24 million or 2.62% compared to 2022/23 forecast is due mainly to the effect of the 2022/23 Capital Works
Program on depreciation and the revaluation of several infrastructure asset classes.
• Increase of $1.46 million in Utilities driven mostly by an increase in Gas costs in Leisure Centres, Electricity and
Telecommunications costs
Change
The term 'right of use asset' refers to assets leased by an organisation for which they have a contractual right to use. Due to a
change in accounting standards the value of Council's leased assets is required to be recognised in Council's accounts as well
as subsequent amortization of said assets. It essentially reflects the consumption of a leased asset over its useful life.
Change
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4.1.13 Borrowing costs
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Interest on loans
2,290
2,383
95
4.14
Total Borrowing costs
2,290
2,383
95
4.14
4.1.14 Finance costs - leases
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Finance costs - leases
332
273
(58)
(17.57)
Total finance costs - leases
332
273
(58)
(17.57)
4.1.15 Other expenses
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Auditors' remuneration - VAGO
75
67
(9)
(11.33)
Auditors' remuneration - internal
67
66
(0)
(0.52)
Bank fees and charges
634
986
352
55.52
Councillors' allowance
460
574
114
24.82
Special Rate Charge
281
318
37
12.98
Pensioner rebate, waivers and relief
385
388
3
0.78
Environmental protection
568
680
112
19.79
Community and business grants
804
825
21
2.61
Other
162
125
(37)
(22.71)
Total other expenses
3,435
4,029
593
17.27
Other expenses relate to a range of unclassified items including contributions to community groups, advertising, insurances,
motor vehicle registrations and other miscellaneous expenditure items.
Other expenses are budgeted to increase by $0.59 million or 17.27% compared to the 2022/23 forecast.
Change
Change
Borrowing costs relate to interest charged by financial institutions on funds borrowed. The increase of $0.1 million or 4.14% due
to additional loans in 2023/24.
Change
Council is now required to account for the interest component of lease payments separately. The interest component included in
lease payments compensates the leasing company for tying up its capital during the lease term.
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4.2 Balance Sheet
4.2.1 Assets
4.2.2 Liabilities
4.2.3 Borrowings
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
Amount borrowed as at 30 June of the prior year
91,048
87,745
Amount proposed to be borrowed
7,000
6,000
Amount projected to be redeemed
(10,303)
(9,020)
Amount of borrowings as at 30 June
87,745
84,725
4.2.4 Leases
Forecast
Budget
2022/23
2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
Right-of-use assets
Plant and equipment
3,301
3,115
Total right-of-use assets
3,301
3,115
Lease liabilities
Current lease Liabilities
Plant and equipment
1,696
456
Total current lease liabilities
1,696
456
Non-current lease liabilities
Plant and equipment
4,023
1,421
Total non-current lease liabilities
4,023
1,421
Total lease liabilities
9,020
4,992
As a result of the introduction of AASB 16 Leases, right-of-use assets and lease liabilities have been recognised as outlined in
the table below:
The decrease in current assets is mainly attributable to a decrease in cash and cash equivalents of ($26.82 million). Cash and
cash equivalents include cash and investments such as cash held in the bank and in petty cash and the value of investments in
deposits or other highly liquid investments with short-term maturities of three months or less.
Other assets includes items such as prepayments for expenses that Council has paid in advance of service delivery, inventories
or stocks held for sale or consumption in Council’s services and other revenues due to be received in the next 12 months. There
are no significant changes expected in these balances.
Total non-current assets are expected to increase by $12.99 million compared to 2022/23.
Current Liabilities
This is partially offset by a decrease of ($1.24 million) in Lease Liabilities as existing lease obligations wind down closer to their
expiry date.
Total non-current liabilities, which represents obligations that Council must pay beyond the next year, are expected to decrease
by ($7.79 million) from 2022/23 primarily due to reductions in lease liabilities and the repayment interest-bearing loans and
borrowings.
Non-Current Assets
The table below shows information on borrowings specifically required by the Regulations.
Property, infrastructure, plant and equipment is the largest component of Council’s Non-Current Assets and represents the value
of all the land, buildings, roads, vehicles, equipment, etc. which has been built up by Council over many years. The increase in
this balance is largely attributable to the Capital Works Program of $72.40 million (which includes carried forward works of
$16.54 million from 2022/23), offset by the depreciation of assets ($48.53 million).
Non-Current Liabilities
Current Assets
Total current liabilities, which represent obligations that Council must pay within the next year, are expected to increase by $7.27
million from 2022/23. This is predominantly due to Trust funds and deposits expected to increase by $3.61 million, Provisions
(including accrued long service leave and annual leave owing to employees) expected to increase by $2.64 million and $1.37
million in interest-bearing liabilities. Interest-bearing liabilities represent the balance of Council's outstanding loans and
borrowings.
Total current assets in 2023/24 are projected to decrease by ($23.56 million) compared to 2022/23 forecast.
Trade and Other receivables increase by $2.96 million. Trade & Other Receivables are monies owed to Council by ratepayers
and others.
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4.3 Statement of changes in Equity
4.3.1 Reserves
• decrease in Major Projects Reserve ($13.32 million);
4.3.2 Equity
4.4 Statement of Cash Flows
4.4.1 Net cash flows provided by/used in operating activities
This is partially offset by:
4.4.2 Net cash flows provided by/used in investing activities
4.4.3 Net cash flows provided by/used in financing activities
• decrease in Developers Contributions ($1.23 million).
Cash flows from investing activities depicts inflows and outflows of cash related to the acquisition and disposal of Council assets.
Assets are deemed to be an 'investment' in the business hence the term 'investment activities'.
Cash flows from investing activities depicts inflows and outflows of cash related to the acquisition and redemption of financial
loans as well as interest payments and principal repayments of loans.
• Reserves - which represents funding set aside for specific purposes as well as changes in the value of Council's
assets after a revaluation takes place. Reserves are budgeted to decrease by ($13.25 million) by the end of 2023/24.
Cash flows from operating activities depicts inflows and outflows of cash from ongoing regular business activities. The net cash
flows from operating activities does not equal the operating surplus (deficit) for the year as this includes non-cash items such as
depreciation which have been excluded from the Cash Flow Statement
Net cash from financing activities is budgeted to end the 2023/24 year with a net outflow of cash of ($8.21 million) after
forecasting to end the 2022/23 year with net inflows of ($7.50 million). This represents an overall outflow of $0.71 million over the
course of the 2022/23 year. This is primarily attributable to a decrease in Proceeds from borrowings of $1.00 million (from $7.00
million forecast in 2022/23 to $6.00 million budgeted for 2023/24).
• An increase in the cash outflows for Employee costs of ($14.55 million) driven by the return to normal operations after the
negative impact caused by COVID-19, that resulted in closure of facilities. The 2022/23 forecast incorporates the impact of
unfilled vacancies across the council in 2022/23, mostly due to the delays in opening of the Brimbank Aquatic & Wellness Centre
(BAWC). The budget for 2023/24 is based on the assumption that every position will be filled throughout the year
Total equity is expected to decrease by ($10.05 million) by the end of 2023/24. Total equity is the net of Council's Total Assets
less Council's Total Liabilities and is made up of the following components:
• Accumulated surplus - which is an accumulation of Council's operating results since its inception. This is budgeted to
increase by $3.20 million by the end of 2023/24.
Reserves are budgeted to decrease by a net ($13.25) million comprising the following movements
• increase in Sinking Fund Reserve $1.30 million;
Net cash outflows from investing activities are budgeted to increase by ($11.56 million) from 2022/23 forecast primarily due a
decrease in Property, plant and equipment outflows of ($10.86 million) combined with an decrease in the cash inflows from the
proceeds of sale of investments of ($0.71 million).
Net cash inflow from operating activities are budgeted to decrease by ($24.77 million) from the 2022/23 forecast mainly due to:
• An increase in the cash outflows for Materials and Services of ($7.24 million) for a return to normal operations. Significant
outflows are primarily due to increase in Utilitities such as Gas costs in Leisure Centres, Electricity and Telecommunications
costs
• A decrease in inflows for Rates and charges of ($1.42 million).
• An increase in cash inflows for User Fees of $2.00 million predominately due to higher income from the Brimbank Aquatic &
Wellness Centre (BAWC) as memberships are projected to increase in 2023/24. The 2022/23 forecast incorporates the impact
of the three months delays in the opening of the Brimbank Aquatic & Wellness Centre (BAWC);
• An increase in cash inflows for Statutory Fees and Fines of $0.98 million budgeting for a return to normal operations as COVID-
19 lapses.
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4.5 Capital works program
4.5.1 Summary
Forecast Budget
2022/23 2023/24
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
%
Property
8,980
9,371
391
4.36
Plant and equipment
5,233
6,469
1,237
23.63
Infrastructure
47,329
56,558
9,229
19.50
Total
61,542 72,399 10,857 17.64
New
Renewal
Upgrade
Grants
Contrib. Council
cash
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Property
9,371 4,232 1,709 3,431
0
0 9,371
Plant and equipment
6,469
6,469
0
0
0
0
6,469
Infrastructure
56,558 22,089 25,834 8,635 1,181
0 55,377
Total
72,399 32,790 27,543 12,066 1,181
0 71,218
4.5.2 Current Budget
2023-24
Capital Works Area
New
Renewal
Upgrade
Grants
Contrib. Council
cash
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
PROPERTY
Land
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Land Improvements
1,222
183
92 948
0
0 1,222
Buildings
5,350 4,049 178 1,123
0
0 5,350
Building Improvements
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Leasehold Improvements
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Heritage buildings
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TOTAL PROPERTY
6,572 4,232 270 2,071
0
0 6,572
PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
Plant, Machinery and Equipment
4,486 4,486
0
0
0
0 4,486
Computers and Telecommunications
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Library books
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TOTAL PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
4,486 4,486
0
0
0
0 4,486
INFRASTRUCTURE
Roads
26,429 2,907 20,944 2,577 1,181
0 25,248
Footpaths and Cycle-ways
1,950 1,929
12
9
0
0 1,950
Drainage
1,050
250 300 500
0
0 1,050
Recreational, Leisure & Community Facilities
9,010 5,713 498 2,799
0
0 9,010
Parks, Open Space and Streetscapes
6,358 4,697
928
732
0
0
6,358
TOTAL INFRASTRUCTURE
44,796 15,496 22,682 6,618 1,181
0 43,615
TOTAL CAPITAL WORKS
55,854 24,214 22,952 8,688 1,181
0 54,673
This section presents a listing of the capital works projects that will be undertaken for the 2023/24 year, classified by expenditure
type and funding source. Works are also disclosed as current budget or carried forward from prior year.
Asset expenditure types
Summary of Funding Sources
Project Cost Asset expenditure types
Summary of Funding Sources
Council's proposed Capital Works Program for 2023/24 will be $72.40 million, which includes $16.55 million of carried forward from
2022/23.
Project Cost
Change
A distinction is made between expenditure on new assets, asset renewal, and upgrade. Asset renewal relates to expenditure on
existing asset or replacement of an existing asset, that returns service level to its original capability. Expenditure on new assets
does not have any element of expansion or upgrade of existing assets, but will result in an additional burden for future operation,
maintenance and capital renewal. It is worth noting that with the Capital renewal expenditure of $23.87 million being below the
annual asset depreciation budget of $48.53 million, Council's assets are deteriorating at a quicker rate than they are being
renewed. Council will be funding $71.22 million or 98.4% of the total capital expenditure.
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• Green Gully Reserve Land Rehabilitation ($0.48 million)
• Various projects $200k or under ($1.27 million)
• Various projects under $100k ($0.10 million)
• Dog Off-leash spaces ($0.35 million)
• Installation of Gross Pollutant Traps ($0.25 million)
• Underground drainage upgrades - various ($0.50 million)
• Water Security Program ($0.3 million)
• Various projects under $200k ($0.76 million)
• Replacement of Library Collection items ($0.80 million)
• Replacement of Passenger/Light Commercial ($1.32 million)
• Replacement of Major Plant/Machinery ($1.77 million)
• Bon Thomas Reserve, Deer Park ($0.24 million)
• Creating Streets for People Implementation ($0.25 million)
Parks, Open Space and Streetscapes
$6.36 million. The more significant projects include:
• Sydenham Park, Keilor North- Share User Trail - Stage 2 Works ($2.00 million)
• Suburban Park Upgrade ($0.60 million)
• Neigbourhood Park upgrade program ($0.45 million)
• Jones Creek Trail Extension, Cairnlea to M80 Ring Road ($0.20 million)
• Green Gully Reserve - GG Close to Denbigh Court ($0.20 million)
• Flagship Renewal Program ($0.95 million)
• Various projects under $200k ($0.49 million)
• Various projects $100k or under ($0.30 million)
• Recreational Leisure and community facilities - ($1.35 million)
• Sunshine Leisure Centre, Upgrade & renewal Works ($0.90 million)
• Sports Reserve lighting upgrade program ($0.45 million)
• Footpath rehabilitation program - various locations ($3.20 million)
• Road pavement asphalt overlay projects - various locations ($5.10 million)
• East-west transmission line cycle path - M80 Trail to Kororoit Creek Trail ($0.25 million)
• Taylors Lakes Easement Shared User Path ($0.30 million)
Footpaths and Cycleway
$1.95 million. The most significant projects include:
• Local Area Traffic Management Projects ($0.77 million)
• Road Humps various locations ($0.34 million)
• Kerb Replacement for property access ($0.30 million)
• Various projects under $300k ($0.70 million)
• Local cycle route connection program ($0.26 million)
For the 2023/24 year, $4.49 million will be expended on:
Plant and equipment
includes plant, machinery, vehicles and equipment, computers and telecommunications and library
• Rolling sportsground reconstruction program ($1.20 million)
• New sportsground development program - ($3.85 million)
Recreational, Leisure & Community Facilities
projects $9.01 million. The most significant projects include:
• Sports facilities pre planning and investigation ($0.2 million)
• Physical activity facilities ($0.25 million)
Drainage
projects $1.05 million including:
• West Sunshine 20 Minute Neighbourhood ($0.25 million)
• Replacement of IT equipment ($0.50 million)
Property
comprises land, buildings, and building improvements including community facilities, municipal offices and sports
For the 2023/24 year, $6.57 million will be expended on Property projects. The more significant projects include:
• Lloyd Reserve, Sunshine - Soccer/ Cricket pavilion upgrade ($0.75 million)
• Robertson's Homestead Restoration ($0.50 million)
• Lionheart Reserve Tennis Pavilion Upgrade, Taylors Lakes ($1.75 million)
• Sunshine Energy Park ($0.76 million)
Infrastructure
includes roads, bridges, footpaths, bikeways, drainage, recreation facilities, parks, open space and streetscapes, off
Roads
$26.43 million. The most significant projects include:
• Road rehabilitation projects - various locations ($16.02 million)
• Community Services and Infrastructure Plan Implementation ($0.40 million)
• JR Parsons Cricket Pavilion ($0.24 million)
• Various Children Facilities - playground upgrade program ($0.25 million)
• Community facilities kitchen upgrade program ($0.20 million)
• Community facilities toilet upgrade program ($0.20 million)
• Various projects under $200k ($1.04 million)
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4.5.3 Works carried forward from the 2022/23 year
Capital Works Area
New Renewal Upgrade Grants Contrib. Council
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
($'000)
Land Improvements
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Heritage buildings
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TOTAL PROPERTY
2,799
0 1,439 1,360
0
0 2,799
PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
Library books
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TOTAL PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
1,984 1,984
0
0
0
0 1,984
INFRASTRUCTURE
Bridges
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Footpaths and Cycle-ways
1,651 1,651
0
0
0
0 1,651
Drainage
100
0
50
50
0
0 100
Waste Management
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Parks, Open Space and Streetscapes
2,429 1,066 818 544
0
0 2,429
Aerodromes
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Off Street Car Parks
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Other Infrastructure
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TOTAL INFRASTRUCTURE
11,762 6,592 3,152 2,018
0
0 11,762
TOTAL CARRIED FORWARD CAPITAL
16,545 8,576 4,591 3,378
0
0 16,545
• New sportsground development program ($3.10 million)
• Lloyd Reserve - New sports change rooms, Sunshine ($2.45 million)
• Female Sports Facility Upgrades ($1.34 million)
• Passenger & light commercials ($1.12 million)
• Plant & Machinery ($0.86 million)
• Road Rehab Biggs Street ($0.73 million)
• Road Rehab - Moondani Avenue ($0.58 million)
• Isabella Williams Memorial Reserve, Deer Park- bridge construnction ($0.55 million)
• Sydenham Rail Corridor Bicycle Track ($0.55 millon)
• Green Gully Reserve Land Rehabilitation ($0.46 million)
• Extra Suburban Park Upgrade ($0.45 million)
• Sassella Park Tennis Lighting ($0.43 million)
• Suburban Park Upgrade Program ($0.41 million)
• Road Rehab Hutchinson Street ($0.30 million)
• Road Rehab Derrimut $0.30 million
• Various Projects minor under $300k ($2.91 million)
For the budget year 2023/24 an amount of $16.55 million has been budgeted to be carried forward from the 2022/23 year. These
Project Cost Asset expenditure types
Summary of Funding Sources
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4.6 Summary of Planned Capital Works Expenditure
For the four years ending 30 June 2027
Total
New
Renewal
Upgrade
Total
Recurrent
Grants
Non
Recurrent
Grants
Contributions
Council Cash
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,222
183
92
948
1,222
0
0
0
1,222
1,222
183
92
948
1,222
0
0
0
1,222
5,350
4,049
178
1,123
5,350
0
0
0
5,350
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0